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Hopes Fall
Sep 10, 2006
HOLY BOOBS, BATMAN!

Cheap Shot posted:

It's getting very hot in my apartment and there's been some heatwaves. I don't have A/C. I'm really worried about my cat. I've been giving her extra wetfood with water mixed in. She's still affectionate and playful, with a good appetite and isn't hiding away, but she's been meowing at me with her mouth open and panting. I'm thinking she's probably overheated?

I'm looking at options to help her cool down. Wood a cooling mat be a good idea? And if so, could someone recommend a really good one?

The fastest and easiest thing you can do is freeze some large water bottles. We used to use the big soda ones for our outdoor rabbits. Fill it halfway, freeze, then lay out on a towel somewhere she's likely to hang out (cat tree/favorite corner etc).

She'll have access to a cooler space immediately while you decide what other steps you can afford.

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WhyZodiac
Oct 29, 2015



code:
Can anyone give me some advice on having two dogs, both border collies, one male 5 years old (neutered) and a female who I adopted in February, 7 years old, not spayed.

They have been fine together, he tried to mount her when they first met, she told him off and that was that.

I asked Vet about spaying female when I got her and she gave advice it was best to ensure she was definitely past being in heat before doing so, as a result we have waited until we knew.

We were given advice to watch for blood spotting, over licking or nesting which we have been watching out for but the male told us she was in heat by going absolutely insane today.

He hasn't tried to mount her yet but he is definitely informing us that she is in season.

Reading online, this is due to last two weeks so I am looking for advice on keeping both happy.

Should we separate them?
Should we keep her in the house throughout?

Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Charles
May 9, 2004

zoom-zoom


Toilet Rascal

Not sure why a vet would give you advice to wait to get her spayed.

WhyZodiac
Oct 29, 2015



Charles posted:

Not sure why a vet would give you advice to wait to get her spayed.
code:
The advice was that if I got her spayed while she was in season, it could lead to an ongoing phantom pregnancy style situation.

Two separate Vets stated this as I switched practises during the last six months.

Murmur Twin
Feb 11, 2003

An ever-honest pacifist with no mind for tricks.


I feel like this is embarrassingly stupid to ask, but is there any problem playing fetch with my dog using a baseball?

I don't have any tennis balls but don't want to go out shopping if I don't have to.

TooMuchAbstraction
Oct 14, 2012

Hubris

Fun Shoe

I don't see why it'd be a problem. Baseballs are softer than some chew toys. Just don't let the dog destroy it.

SocksAndSandals
Jun 6, 2011


Does anybody know what insect these belong to? i'm guessing some type of spider but not sure.



SocksAndSandals fucked around with this message at 17:58 on Jul 18, 2020

Spectral Elvis
Jul 23, 2007

Spider fool! spider fool! He can't do what a spider can!

Can't climb walls, can't spin webs, that is why he is dead.

Look out! here comes the spider fool!

I need some rabbit rehoming advice. I had two female rabbits approx. 4 years old, both unneutered. Recently one of them died and the remaining rabbit is obviously very lonely now her playmate has gone. I've decided it's better I get her rehomed somewhere with other rabbits rather than find her a new friend.

What I could really use help understanding is what kind of home I need to find, as I understand rabbits can be a fair bit fickle socially. Is it best if I get her neutered first? Is it possible to introduce a female to other females without a fight, and so on? if she was neutered would she be fine with a neutered male? The only thing I am certain about is that she is not keen on any form of petting, so certainly not suitable for children.

There are local rescue centres who can help with introductions, but owing to the current circumstances that's about as far as they'll go. I should mention also that I live in an area that is hugely superstitious about rabbits to the point you simply don't say the 'R' word (wish I was joking!), so it's likely I'll need to look a bit further afield.

BONESAWWWWWW
Dec 23, 2009




I want a pet but I have a lot of challenges, mentally, picking the right one. If anyone could help, even just to tell me that I'm being unrealistic in some aspect, it would do me a lot of good.

Ideally I want an animal that I can play with in some regard - for example, I really like turtles but I'm not sure to what regard you can just hang out with a turtle sitting on you without both of you being uncomfortable. Snakes are cool but I'm not sure if I like the idea of feeding a creature to another creature. I may just have to get over this...
In the same vein, it would be best for both of us if the critter was not nocturnal.
As per my wife's rules, it also has to be primarily cage-bound (i.e. no cats or dogs). Livestock and animals that live outdoors are prohibited in my area, unfortunately.

I have contemplated getting a pair of rats but I hear their lifespan is rather short, and I'm not sure I want to get invested in an animal that's not bound to be alive for too long.

Are there any ideas? Is it as simple as "get a guinea pig" or something?

Amorphous Abode
Apr 2, 2010


We may have finally found unobtainium but I will never find eywa.



BONESAWWWWWW posted:

I want a pet but I have a lot of challenges, mentally, picking the right one. If anyone could help, even just to tell me that I'm being unrealistic in some aspect, it would do me a lot of good.

Ideally I want an animal that I can play with in some regard - for example, I really like turtles but I'm not sure to what regard you can just hang out with a turtle sitting on you without both of you being uncomfortable. Snakes are cool but I'm not sure if I like the idea of feeding a creature to another creature. I may just have to get over this...
In the same vein, it would be best for both of us if the critter was not nocturnal.
As per my wife's rules, it also has to be primarily cage-bound (i.e. no cats or dogs). Livestock and animals that live outdoors are prohibited in my area, unfortunately.

I have contemplated getting a pair of rats but I hear their lifespan is rather short, and I'm not sure I want to get invested in an animal that's not bound to be alive for too long.

Are there any ideas? Is it as simple as "get a guinea pig" or something?

I've read that some species of turtle are quite playful, as far as reptiles go. Apparently when you've got a shell and can hide in a lake, you have a lot of free time and energy for "play behavior," which in turtle terms, means climbing on things and chasing balls around I guess.

Cowslips Warren
Oct 29, 2005

What use had they for tricks and cunning, living in the enemy's warren and paying his price?



Grimey Drawer

Box turtles have a ton of personality but in terms of them chilling on your lap, probably not.

Guinea pigs (2) might be a good thing to look into. Plus you'll eat healthier with all the veges you buy for them too.

BONESAWWWWWW
Dec 23, 2009




Cowslips Warren posted:

Box turtles have a ton of personality but in terms of them chilling on your lap, probably not.

Guinea pigs (2) might be a good thing to look into. Plus you'll eat healthier with all the veges you buy for them too.

Thanks! I have decided on guinea pigs and am working on getting a spot set up for them ✌️ they aren't 100% what I wanted but they check enough boxes and will be a good place for me to get started.

Redczar
Nov 9, 2011



We are moving across the street with our 3–year-old fairly intelligent dog. We’ve read a lot of guides to help prepare the dog but we have one doubt. She will be with a friend while we actually move. When we pick her up is it more advisable to take her to the empty old apartment first to see, or just go directly to the new one?

coolusername
Aug 23, 2011

cooltitletext


How do you know when it's time?

I have a 16 year old cat with arthritis. She gets pain medication daily since otherwise she yells a lot and limps. As long as she has that, she seems pretty happy? She still likes to lounge around in the sun, get cuddles, can climb up the scratching post for her treats and take lots of naps. I just worry that I'm going to be blind to the day when it turns from her being mostly happy to mostly unhappy and cling on because I love her so much, when I should be letting her go.

Slugworth
Feb 18, 2001

If two grown men can't make a pervert happy for a few minutes in order to watch a film about zombies, then maybe we should all just move to Iran!


coolusername posted:

How do you know when it's time?

I have a 16 year old cat with arthritis. She gets pain medication daily since otherwise she yells a lot and limps. As long as she has that, she seems pretty happy? She still likes to lounge around in the sun, get cuddles, can climb up the scratching post for her treats and take lots of naps. I just worry that I'm going to be blind to the day when it turns from her being mostly happy to mostly unhappy and cling on because I love her so much, when I should be letting her go.
I've posted this before, and I still believe it. Having seen hundreds of euthanasias, people who really love their pet tend to get the timing right. You have edge cases where there are some mental health issues that make them cling on too long, but generally, people just know when it's time. You aren't gonna do it too soon, because you love them and want to keep them for as long as you can. And you aren't gonna let it go too long because you love them, and seeing them genuinely suffer hurts you.

If it helps though, the generally accepted time is "having more bad days then good". I think refusing to eat, even with medical intervention is a good indicator as well.

coolusername
Aug 23, 2011

cooltitletext


Slugworth posted:

I've posted this before, and I still believe it. Having seen hundreds of euthanasias, people who really love their pet tend to get the timing right. You have edge cases where there are some mental health issues that make them cling on too long, but generally, people just know when it's time. You aren't gonna do it too soon, because you love them and want to keep them for as long as you can. And you aren't gonna let it go too long because you love them, and seeing them genuinely suffer hurts you.

If it helps though, the generally accepted time is "having more bad days then good". I think refusing to eat, even with medical intervention is a good indicator as well.

That actually helps a lot, thanks. I just worry about her and making sure she has the best life especially as the athritis is becoming very noticeable.



Here is the lady in question, having a nap.

McCracAttack
Feb 21, 2006



e:nm

McCracAttack fucked around with this message at 01:35 on Dec 10, 2020

AnonymousNarcotics
Aug 6, 2012

we will go far into the sea
you will take me
onto your back
never look back
never look back


Can someone help me problem solve here?

TL;DR: Is there a way to allow a dog to get in and out of a bedroom while keeping cats out completely?

Long version:
My parents live in a house with a dog. My brother lives in the basement with a cat.

Both dog and cat can go wherever, but usually my brother closes the door to the basement at night with the cat downstairs. Also, my mom doesn't like the cat in her bedroom so that door stays closed during the day, but open at night so the dog can go in and out.

I stayed there over the summer with my cats as well. At the time I had 2, now I have 3. The area I stayed in last time was good in terms of being able to keep my cats contained at night so they didn't go upstairs (and potentially into my parents' room) or downstairs (and bother my brother's cat). The downside of that room though is that it's basically the den, and people walk through there all the time, so it's not an ideal "bedroom" situation.

I'm planning on going back to stay with them for month or so. Ideally, I would like to sleep in the extra bedroom, which is upstairs next to my parents' room.

I COULD have all 3 cats closed in the room with me and keep a litter box and water in there, but it would be a tight squeeze.

Preferably I would like to figure out a way for them to be able to go anywhere except my parents' room. But, like I said, the door has to stay open to allow the dog to go in and out (otherwise she'll scratch and wake everyone up anyway).

Does anyone have a creative solution for allowing the dog to go in and out as she pleases but still keep the cats out?

Amorphous Abode
Apr 2, 2010


We may have finally found unobtainium but I will never find eywa.



Install a pet flap with a microchip reader into your parents' bedroom door, and only register the dog for access.
As a bonus, this will keep raccoons and possums out of your parents' bedroom as well.

A CRUNK BIRD
Sep 29, 2004


I wonder if somebody might have a tip or trick for me. My mom's dumb old dog scraped her paw on a rock at the beach about 5 months ago and hasn't left the wound alone since. She habitually licks and chews at it, not giving it a chance to fully heal. My mom is classically "too nice" to the dog and insisted for months that a pet cone wasn't necessary, she could just keep an eye on the dog and stop her from licking it, etc. Obviously it didn't work and I finally got her to put the drat cone on this dog. The problem is that my mom is a 65 year old lady with a slightly foggy brain who forgets to put the cone back on after letting the dog out, letting her eat, or whatever other reason she takes the cone off the dog for (she is too nice to the dog.) Earlier today this cost us about a week of healing progress as the dog was left alone without the cone for 15 minutes and chewed the scab back open. I really need this thing to heal up.

Does anybody know a good solution to this besides or in addition to the cone? My mom says the dog has chewed through bandages and ignores the supposedly foul tasting stuff she's applied for this purpose. I googled around but I figured folks here might have some good suggestions.

A photo of the idiot in question:

cruft
Oct 25, 2007



A CRUNK BIRD posted:

I wonder if somebody might have a tip or trick for me. My mom's dumb old dog scraped her paw on a rock at the beach about 5 months ago and hasn't left the wound alone since. She habitually licks and chews at it, not giving it a chance to fully heal. My mom is classically "too nice" to the dog and insisted for months that a pet cone wasn't necessary, she could just keep an eye on the dog and stop her from licking it, etc. Obviously it didn't work and I finally got her to put the drat cone on this dog. The problem is that my mom is a 65 year old lady with a slightly foggy brain who forgets to put the cone back on after letting the dog out, letting her eat, or whatever other reason she takes the cone off the dog for (she is too nice to the dog.) Earlier today this cost us about a week of healing progress as the dog was left alone without the cone for 15 minutes and chewed the scab back open. I really need this thing to heal up.

Does anybody know a good solution to this besides or in addition to the cone? My mom says the dog has chewed through bandages and ignores the supposedly foul tasting stuff she's applied for this purpose. I googled around but I figured folks here might have some good suggestions.

A photo of the idiot in question:


Hello, friend. I think you should talk to your mom's physician about her fogginess.

The cone of shame is a safe, inexpensive, and effective way to deal with letting the wound heal. I think the problem you need to address is the "too nice" problem you mentioned twice. Speaking as a pet owner whose mom is in the late stages of Alzheimer's, my approach here would be to figure out the situations where she's removing the cone, and make a big enough to those changes that she'd instead have to figure out how to work around the change. That could mean putting the food bowl on a pedestal, changing the type of collar to something your mom can't easily figure out how to unlatch, etc.

Just realized this cone of shame might not attach to the collar? You might be able to punch some holes into it so that it can attach with twist ties or something, that might be a pretty good deterrent to removing it.

Professor Shark
May 22, 2012




Our cat is stuck in the ceiling between our first floor and basement. She is meowing, but hides if there is too much noise. She appears to have climbed up some shelving when the cable guy left the storage room door open and she accessed the unfinished ceiling. She can move around, but the cables and pipes don’t make it easy.

I currently have an open can of sardines left out and a series of stages that might allow her to get down if she can find a way to get to the first storage rack. Anything else I can do?

Killingyouguy!
Sep 8, 2014



I walk through an off-leash dog park sometimes, and I think my body language is frightening the dogs. If one runs up to me I tend to just stand still because I don't know whether they're friendly or bitey or what. This seems to make the dog back up and look unsure but also not run off until someone calls them. What should I be doing in this situation?

SkunkDuster
Jul 15, 2005






Impulsive Bob got his stimulus check and bought a siberian husky from a breeder around May 2020.
3 days later, Bob changed his mind and gave it to his sister.
The sister has a dog that is very protective of her and would attack the husky.
The sister gave the husky to me last September and all is good in the world now.

That's the back story. When I took the husky to the vet a few months ago to get spayed and microchipped, they said she already had a microchip (inserted by the breeder) that had never been registered.

I called the breeder and they gave me the microchip number and said all I had to do is go online and register it. They recommended using buddyid.com. Is that the route I should use or is there a better way to register the microchip? As I understand it, different registrars use different databases, so I don't really understand how that works.

Charles
May 9, 2004

zoom-zoom


Toilet Rascal

SkunkDuster posted:

Impulsive Bob got his stimulus check and bought a siberian husky from a breeder around May 2020.
3 days later, Bob changed his mind and gave it to his sister.
The sister has a dog that is very protective of her and would attack the husky.
The sister gave the husky to me last September and all is good in the world now.

That's the back story. When I took the husky to the vet a few months ago to get spayed and microchipped, they said she already had a microchip (inserted by the breeder) that had never been registered.

I called the breeder and they gave me the microchip number and said all I had to do is go online and register it. They recommended using buddyid.com. Is that the route I should use or is there a better way to register the microchip? As I understand it, different registrars use different databases, so I don't really understand how that works.

If you enter your microchip in here it will tell you the manufacturer, and who to register it with.
https://petmicrochiplookup.org/

I haven't done shelter stuff in a while, so somebody can tell me if there's another method but this seems to be easiest.

Gramps
Dec 30, 2006





Anyone have a recommendation for a pet safe lotion? My kitty was a feral and his ears are pretty scarred up from what I can only assume was a nasty case of mange. They've been looking rough and dry lately and they seem to be bothering him a bit more than usual. I just need something that isn't going to mess with his already sensitive stomach if he somehow licks it.

Extra row of tits
Oct 31, 2020


Hello,

This is my first visit here and I am a relatively new member of the site. Can you recommend a thread for people that have a new axolotl?

Thank you.

Mr Owl
Dec 27, 2008



Is their a thread for bird watchers? I had a look but had no luck

Instant Jellyfish
Jul 3, 2007

Actually not a fish.





Extra row of tits posted:

Hello,

This is my first visit here and I am a relatively new member of the site. Can you recommend a thread for people that have a new axolotl?

Thank you.

Here you go


Mr Owl posted:

Is their a thread for bird watchers? I had a look but had no luck

And for you

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Extra row of tits
Oct 31, 2020



Thank you.

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