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Slung Blade
Jul 10, 2002

IN STEEL WE TRUST



I darned a couple socks around the end of the year, you don't really need a kit or anything so long as you have some appropriate needles and something to give the sock some shape. I used a 500ml mason jar with rounded corners for mine.

I think the biggest trick is to start far enough away from the hole and give yourself enough room for you to weave in sufficient thread to hold your repair in place via friction.

I can't really comment on what yarn or thread to use, that's entirely up to the existing sock you're trying to repair.

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HelloIAmYourHeart
Dec 29, 2008

Send us signals in the glow
of night windows



Fallen Rib

I used an orange when I darned my socks. They're pretty thick wool socks from costco, so I used a wool sock yarn. If I were darning a pair of cotton socks, I'd actually probably still use wool, just the thinnest I could find--cotton has NO stretch and a woven darn has very little stretch. Also, wool will sort of felt up on itself and tighten up and solidify.

KozmoNaut
Apr 23, 2008

Happiness is a warm
Turbo Plasma Rifle


An LED bulb with a plastic outer shell also works great as a form.

learnincurve
May 15, 2014

What is this boring crap we're watching? Check if Antiques Roadshow is on




I bought a darning mushroom and used wool, just because of Sandra the real seamstress from Ankh-Morpork who kept having to hit people with a mushroom who confused her with the other kind of seamstress.

Strong Sauce
Jul 2, 2003

You know I am not really your father.




thanks for the tips! i do have some lightbulbs because i haven't had the chance to get that disposed of properly so maybe i'll try that

i do also need info about needles which is why i asked if i should just buy some random darning kit on amazon to get them.

HelloIAmYourHeart
Dec 29, 2008

Send us signals in the glow
of night windows



Fallen Rib

I used used an embroidery needle. It just has to be big enough to fit your yarn through.

YggiDee
Sep 12, 2007




Fallen Rib

Are there any good fabric stores that don't charge an arm and a leg to ship to Canada? Ontario just hit another lockdown and I gotta make hats!!!

effika
Jun 19, 2005
Birds do not want you to know any more than you already do.

Discovery Fabric is in Canada and I never order from them because the shipping to the US is atrocious. Maybe it's better within the country? Lots of people like them, and if you're looking for anything vaguely outdoors/sports they probably have it.

Jinxie Monroe
Apr 8, 2007

No really.
Thank you.


https://www.simplififabric.ca/ and https://www.fabcycle.shop/ are my current go-tos for fabric in Canada. Fabcycle is specifically deadstock which is a nice touch, and they get some neat stuff out of old mills sometimes.

Lead out in cuffs
Sep 18, 2012

"That's right. We've evolved."

"I can see that. Cool mutations."



Also Funky Monkey for plush/kids' knits. Pretty sure they're in Ontario. When I was making the otter plush a few months ago, they had the best selection of minky I could find online anywhere in Canada.

https://funkymonkeyfabrics.com/

YggiDee
Sep 12, 2007




Fallen Rib

Thanks bunches, these are way better than making sad noises at the US exchange rate. Fabcycle has some lovely selections, and also for three dollars they'll apparently just throw in a box of whatever fabric they have lying around and my chronically indecisive ADHD rear end appreciates it.

Slung Blade
Jul 10, 2002

IN STEEL WE TRUST



YggiDee posted:

Are there any good fabric stores that don't charge an arm and a leg to ship to Canada? Ontario just hit another lockdown and I gotta make hats!!!

If you want heavy stuff, JT's outdoor fabrics is out of Ontario.
https://www.jtsoutdoorfabrics.com/

Paccana is out of Calgary, shipping rates are reasonable.
https://www.paccana.com/


I recently purchased a good quantity of fabric and supplies from both, both were great to deal with and prompt with service. I recommend both.

Slung Blade fucked around with this message at 03:28 on Apr 10, 2021

Jinxie Monroe
Apr 8, 2007

No really.
Thank you.


YggiDee posted:

Fabcycle has some lovely selections, and also for three dollars they'll apparently just throw in a box of whatever fabric they have lying around and my chronically indecisive ADHD rear end appreciates it.

I love it since I usually like to start with a material and get inspired from there, and they get some unusual things that can be put to fun use. A friend of mine regularly gets their scrap boxes to make into little quilted bags.

Really the only downside is their fabric classification can be a bit hit or miss, but the same can be said of a lot of retail fabric stores.

The_Hatt
Apr 29, 2005



Got bored and made a stuffed chew toy out of canvas for my dog a couple weeks back:



Took him a couple of days to figure it out:

effika
Jun 19, 2005
Birds do not want you to know any more than you already do.

The_Hatt posted:

Got bored and made a stuffed chew toy out of canvas for my dog a couple weeks back:



Took him a couple of days to figure it out:


Yes good

A.s.P.
Jun 29, 2006

They're just a bunch of shapes. Don't read too deeply into it.

Anyone have experience lowering the crotch on a jumpsuit or pants by inserting a gusset? 🤗

taiyoko
Jan 10, 2008




A.s.P. posted:

Anyone have experience lowering the crotch on a jumpsuit or pants by inserting a gusset? 🤗

I have seen old ads for jeans that had a diamond-shaped gusset in the crotch area so you could roundhouse kick in them like Chuck Norris, but that doesn't "lower" the crotch to make them drop crotch/saggy diaper look. Or if you mean "the distance between waist and crotch is too short, and it's digging in/giving me camel toe", you'll be better off drafting anew.

Here's a pic taken from the Threads March 2018 issue on pants fitting that's relevant, "HBL" stands for horizontal body line, basically lines used to establish a reference. They suggest starting on the front pattern piece with one just above crotch level and perpendicular to the grain line, with two more parallel above at 3-inch intervals, then transferring them to the back pattern such that they would match at the side seam. The front crotch curve can be adjusted similarly to the pictured back if needed.

cloudy
Jul 3, 2007

Alive to the universe; dead to the world.

edit: totally changing the direction of this post...

Any recs for good beginning quilting books or resources? I have a skillshare membership for some amount of months and there seems a decent program on there, but if anyone has something they love let me know!

cloudy fucked around with this message at 22:38 on Jun 9, 2021

learnincurve
May 15, 2014

What is this boring crap we're watching? Check if Antiques Roadshow is on




Before you buy any quilting book read these and use them as your guide, it will honestly save you hours and hours of work as a new quilter.

https://www.thesprucecrafts.com/easy-half-square-triangle-units-for-quilts-2821466
https://www.thesprucecrafts.com/easy-quarter-square-triangle-units-2821468
https://www.thesprucecrafts.com/magic-8-half-square-triangle-units-282144

Quilting patchwork and appliquť by DK is the go to newbie book
Donna Koolerís encyclopaedia of Quilting
Martin Mitchell has a whole series of books, they tend to be expensive new dirt cheap second hand and all of them are great
The quilters ultimate visual guide edited by Ellen Phal is probably my favourite.

The best how to make each block book with exact instructions I have is A block a day 365 quilting squares by Lucinda Ganderton.

cloudy
Jul 3, 2007

Alive to the universe; dead to the world.

Thank you!! You are a gem 💎

I'm excited to try something new. Just purchased my first mid-range NEW machine. I'm 34 and I've made it this long with a 90's hand-me-down. The end of an era.

Liquid Communism
Mar 9, 2004


Out here, everything hurts.




Also, nothing wrong with doing something dirt simple to get started. Picking up a bunch of fat quarters of quilters' cotton for cheap and doing a square patchwork top to get some idea of how to keep things square and even across a full blanket is really helpful. My first one was decidedly neither until I learned to sew a steady seam. Still kicking around my front room as a day blanket 25+ years later, though.

Fru Fru
Sep 14, 2007
We're gonna need a bigger boat...and some water.

If you can find one, I recommend getting a 1/4 inch guide foot for your machine. I had one when I first started out with quilting and it was incredibly helpful.

cloudy
Jul 3, 2007

Alive to the universe; dead to the world.

I took all of your advice-- thank you all! Bought a quarter inch foot as well as a walking foot (as recommended by the nice sewing store ladies). Here's my first mini quilt, was hoping it'd be decent enough to hang on my little blanket ladder, and I think I did OK!

https://twitter.com/c10udy/status/1405646705496887303?s=19

Definitely figured out the areas that I will need to improve on. If you all are up for some quilt discourse... I watched 2 different tutorials, and got told 2 different recommendations for seams. One person said press seams to the side and nest, the other said press all seams open. Also one person said backstitching wasn't necessary when piecing, another said it was. Is this the "salt or no salt in pasta water" of the quilting world???

effika
Jun 19, 2005
Birds do not want you to know any more than you already do.

I LOVE THE COLORS YAY SO BRIGHT

Always backstitch unless you have another way of securing your threads.

The rest is up to you and what way you decide looks best and is easier.

Liquid Communism
Mar 9, 2004


Out here, everything hurts.




Very nice! Seconding effika, nice color choices.

Lead out in cuffs
Sep 18, 2012

"That's right. We've evolved."

"I can see that. Cool mutations."



That looks great, especially for a first attempt! Are those mitered corners on the border?

Also this is, among other things, the quilt discourse channel.

And yeah pressing to the side vs pressing open is very much up to you. I feel like the argument for pressing open is that it can lie flatter, but quilting cotton is so thin that I doubt you'd really notice. I feel like I did it on my first quilt and then never bothered. I also feel like pressing to the side might be stronger? (Again, though, you quilt everything down at the end, so it doesn't matter much.)

cloudy
Jul 3, 2007

Alive to the universe; dead to the world.

Lead out in cuffs posted:

Are those mitered corners on the border?

Yeah! Finishing that binding was some kind of torture. Gotta get better at that maneuver.


Lead out in cuffs posted:

I also feel like pressing to the side might be stronger?

Yeah, that's what I was thinking! I pressed mine flat because it's easier to not have to think about which direction to press. But I wonder if the pro opinion is flat for art quilts that will rarely see a washing machine, and to the side/nested for utilitarian quilts... utili-quilts.

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Fru Fru
Sep 14, 2007
We're gonna need a bigger boat...and some water.

That looks great!

I donít always backstitch when piecing but it depends on the piece. Like in yours I wouldnít bother with the triangles but I might when I put the rows together so the edges donít come apart during quilting and binding. Even then I am kinda lazy and that will be sewn over during binding so itís not the end of the world.

Great job on the binding also! Sometimes I will make rounded corners so I donít have to deal with mitres. I am not ashamed and also they look cute!

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