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Klams Jam
Sep 8, 2007


PK posted:

Are there already darts in it? You may not want to take in too much more through the darts if there are. Maybe you could take some out through the side seam?

Thing is I'm pretty busty. There's about difference between my bust and my waist.

There aren't any darts in it at the moment. I'm not thinking take in the sides so it fits my bust, then nip the waist a little with darts? I think there's about 4 inches needs to come off the waist.

I was also wondering about the arms - will they look really off if I'm nipping and tucking all over?

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papermastermind
May 25, 2005

I make for a salty appetizer!

Was also wondering: on button-up shirts that are unfinished at the bottom (rise up at the sides), is there any way to make the material even up when putting in a dart? I know you're suppose to tuck them in anyway, but I don't want to wear every shirt tucked in.

seriouslywtf
Jul 10, 2003

Seriously. WTF?

I just wanted to post and say that you guys have inspired me to sign up for a local sewing class (I'm retarded and need someone to show it to me). I'm excited.

Lady googooGaGa
Nov 3, 2006

Are you freaking kidding me!?

seriouslywtf posted:

I just wanted to post and say that you guys have inspired me to sign up for a local sewing class (I'm retarded and need someone to show it to me). I'm excited.

Thats a really good idea if you are interested in learning. Articles and tutorials can be great but nothing beats someone showing you.

My high school sewing teacher was vicious. She had one of those embroidery magnifying glasses and she would check out everything -- including our stay-stitching. She had no qualms about ripping out your work. She was crazy. Every time I see her (I live back in my hometown) she bitches that I didn't go to the Lesage School. I still want to, but I don't have the money, and Euros suck right now for conversion. If I ever find myself sitting on a years salary with nothing to do I am so there. My dream would be to either have my own successful shop or to spend my days stitching away in a workshop in Paris. God that would be great.

PK
Apr 30, 2004

EXFOLIATE! EXFOLIATE! EXFOLIATE!


Klams Jam posted:

Thing is I'm pretty busty. There's about difference between my bust and my waist.

There aren't any darts in it at the moment. I'm not thinking take in the sides so it fits my bust, then nip the waist a little with darts? I think there's about 4 inches needs to come off the waist.

I was also wondering about the arms - will they look really off if I'm nipping and tucking all over?

I would say shape the side seams first and take take in the waist with darts to fit it more. While you're doing the side seams you can also take it into the sleeve seam if you find the upper arms kinda baggy. If you're concerned about armhole/shoulder seam hanging out past your natural shoulder, you might want to see a tailor since that can be a tricky area to alter (sleeve cap needs to be reshaped).

RedFish
Aug 6, 2006
..blue fish, one fish, two fish: blue fish need not apply.

seriouslywtf posted:

I just wanted to post and say that you guys have inspired me to sign up for a local sewing class (I'm retarded and need someone to show it to me). I'm excited.

I'm jealous. I've been searching for local sewing classes in my area (Kitchener-Wterloo Ontario) with no luck; I'm not even sure where I should be looking. Google is not getting me anywhere.

Any ideas?

PK
Apr 30, 2004

EXFOLIATE! EXFOLIATE! EXFOLIATE!


RedFish posted:

I'm jealous. I've been searching for local sewing classes in my area (Kitchener-Wterloo Ontario) with no luck; I'm not even sure where I should be looking. Google is not getting me anywhere.

Any ideas?

Have you tried calling your local fabric store? I know the Atlantic Fabrics down here in NS used to have sewing lessons. Some sewing machine stores also host lessons.

seriouslywtf
Jul 10, 2003

Seriously. WTF?

RedFish posted:

I'm jealous. I've been searching for local sewing classes in my area (Kitchener-Wterloo Ontario) with no luck; I'm not even sure where I should be looking. Google is not getting me anywhere.

Any ideas?
I'm really lucky to live in a big city (Chicago), so Google turned up a thread on Yelp about where to find sewing lessons in the city, and there were multiple great recommendations. I'd check on Yelp (or if there's another site that is geared towards that type of thing) maybe, or other city-specific sites/forums.

Molly Bloom
Nov 9, 2006

Yes.


Anyone have a good source for cutting bias strips? I used to know how...

Currently I'm working on a tartan wrap dress (I'm thinking DVF meets Vivienne Westwood) but I know it won't turn out as cool as I thought it would, as I'm just drafting the pattern as opposed to draping it. Also I somehow didn't get enough fabric to cut the whole thing on the bias like I would have wanted.

The second project is making some Irish crochet lace with a .6 mm hook and some sewing thread. As I'm another member of the 'really big tits, small waist' club,I have found most antique blouses do not work on large busts. So I'm making my own based on some samples of the technique at the V+A. I'm about to cry- each little rose is smaller than my thumbnail.


Sigh. I'm either blind, dyslexic or both.

Molly Bloom fucked around with this message at 21:26 on Dec 12, 2007

Strelnikov
Jul 24, 2004
I want to compose and decompose.

Molly Bloom posted:

The second project is making some Irish crochet lace with a .6 mm hook and some sewing thread. As I'm another member of the 'really big tits, small waist' club,I have found most antique blouses do not work on large busts. So I'm making my own based on some samples of the technique at the V+A. I'm about to cry- each little rose is smaller than my thumbnail.


Sigh. I'm either blind, dyslexic or both.

Do you have pictures of it? I'd love to see it; the smallest I've ever been able to crochet lace has been #30 thread, and I didn't manage to get more than a couple inches into the edging because i just couldn't see where to put the hook. For nerdy vintagey historical stuff, I like knitting lace a lot better...

squirrellypoo
Feb 8, 2003


Molly Bloom posted:

Anyone have a good source for cutting bias strips? I used to know how...
These instructions look pretty good, as they show you how to join them together, too. Have you got a bias tape maker? Those things are wooooooonderful, and so much easier than burning your fingers trying to do it yourself. I've also found they're really good for making thin spaghetti straps for little summer tops. *sigh*

I finished my yellow satin dress this morning before work. I just need to press the hem before I slip it on on Friday night.

Edit: VVV there will be many pics after I wear it tomorrow night. I was on my own this morning and I've got my office christmas party tonight so I won't be home until stupid late.

squirrellypoo fucked around with this message at 16:10 on Dec 13, 2007

Moms Stuffing
Jun 2, 2005

the little green one

squirrellypoo posted:

I finished my yellow satin dress this morning before work. I just need to press the hem before I slip it on on Friday night.

Pics plz

Pile of Kittens
Apr 23, 2005

Why does everything STILL smell like pussy?



I just keep wanting to make Burning Man clothing. Origami crane tail bustle made of layered muslin and tulle. Denim underbust corset covered in white lace (how very country). I'm making a standard ruffled tulle bustle to wear to a party tomorrow night.

You know, I have two jobs, I really don't have time for this... but my sewing machine just stares at me until I guiltily work on my projects.

Fino Martini
Jan 23, 2006



I have a white shawl collar pullover that I'd like to dye a different color. I was hoping for black or a shade of gray and was looking for some tips and advice.

First, I have no clue on how I would even dye this, would I probably have to order the dye from a specialty store on line or is this something that like a Michaels or Joanns would have. (These are fabric/craft stores I've seen, not sure if they are national.)

And once I have my dye, and links to what the best way to dye something is? And finally it's not a garment I would wash a lot, but I would hope that it wouldn't fate and look poorly done. And also wouldn't want the ink to stain other stuff.

So any help would be awesome, even if you can only answer one of my questions and not all.

Also I think I'm going to look into a local sewing class too, I need a hobby.

Cat Fancier
Dec 3, 2006


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Cat Fancier fucked around with this message at 20:41 on Feb 16, 2018

Klams Jam
Sep 8, 2007


Since we are talking about dying fabrics...

I have a pair of white canvas tap shoes that I need to be black. What's the best way to dye them, bearing in mind that soaking them in dye probably wont work as they will fall apart!

Also, how do I get the heel from white to black? Marker pen?

squirrellypoo
Feb 8, 2003


Fino Martini posted:

I have a white shawl collar pullover that I'd like to dye a different color.
You really need to know the fiber content before you can go any further, it's necessary for choosing the right dye.

Captain Schlork posted:

Knit fabrics require at the very least a good overlock/merrow/whateveryoucallit machine and a sewing machine with a neat stretch stitch option. Preferably a coverstitch machine as well and these guys cost a poo poo ton of money. You'll just gently caress up your shirt if you sew it up with ordinary stitches.
Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit.

Home sewing machines can handle knits perfectly fine if you:
  • Use a ballpoint needle
  • Use a narrow zig zag stitch (or a triple stretch stitch if your machine has one)
  • Don't stretch the fabric as you sew

There is absolutely no need for a beginning sewer to have to buy an expensive overlocker just to make a loving teeshirt, and that kind of attitude is just going to turn them off sewing altogether rather than get into the joys of making clothing that fits and looks good. Hell, one of my first projects was resizing a teeshirt, and god knows if I'd read your post I'd probably not even tried.

And for the requests to see my yellow dress, here it is from friday night's party. I'll get up more photos on my site tomorrow. I'm too cold to do anything more now.

Cat Fancier
Dec 3, 2006


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Cat Fancier fucked around with this message at 20:41 on Feb 16, 2018

Lady googooGaGa
Nov 3, 2006

Are you freaking kidding me!?

I agree with both of you to an extent. If you're going to make a T-shirt from a pattern, an overlock machine would be ideal. If you don't have one, yes, it is possible, but you want to be very careful when finishing the seams because its going to cause problems. The neckline ribbing would be tricky too. I've done t-shirty type shirts and french seamed the side seams to keep it from fraying to poo poo, but it was crazy time consuming and it did have a 'made' look to it.

Now, the whole debate for me is that some really well made home-sewn looks like it was made, but in a good way. Detail stitching, etc can be really cute when done well. However, I agree that the first T-shirt will probably look a little rugged. Thats okay. Keep at it until you learn enough to make it look the way you like. Chances are it isn't going to look like an AA tee, but that doesn't have to be a bad thing.

Also, I really like the yellow dress too, but I agree that the hem needs work. Did you machine or hand sew it? I'm not saying this to be bitchy at all, so I hope it doesn't offend, but it doesn't look pressed enough. On the side seams did you sew in the ditch when you did them?

I tend to use my overlock to do the bottom edge, then iron that inward and up, and hand-sew the hem.

Gonktastic
Jan 18, 2007



How difficult would a lined vest be to make? I tried on this gorgeous bartendery type vest at Bebe and can't ever imagine paying $100 for something like that.

Seems like it's a lot of pieces and a pain in the rear end to make though- anybody have experience?

My Hawaiian shirt isn't going too well.

Cat Fancier
Dec 3, 2006


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Cat Fancier fucked around with this message at 20:42 on Feb 16, 2018

RedFish
Aug 6, 2006
..blue fish, one fish, two fish: blue fish need not apply.

Captain Schlork posted:

Dressmaker discouraging newbies from experimenting

I appreciate 'experts' weighing in on this thread, but can I ask that you avoid openly raining on people's parades?

I've taken it as a given that my first year's worth of projects are going to look like crap. That's to be expected. It's very disheartening to hear an 'expert' come in and tell us that unless we already know what we're doing and have expensive machinery that you are 'against' us even trying, since obviously it's going to be impossible and not to waste our time.

I am sure you didn't mean it that way, but ouch. We need to be cultivating bravery in this thread.

The 'first thing I sewed at home' was a long a-line skirt with a zipper back in high school, and I wore it to pieces. It wasn't the most professional looking garment, but I was proud of it regardless.

Lady googooGaGa
Nov 3, 2006

Are you freaking kidding me!?

RedFish posted:


I am sure you didn't mean it that way, but ouch. We need to be cultivating bravery in this thread.


I understand where you and others might get the idea that she is trying to talk you out of doing projects, but I didn't get that vibe from her at all. Like the poster who asked about the $100 vest...I completely agree. Considering good material and stuff will run her about $50 she might be better off buying the vest she likes and then testing on cheaper material.

I would never encourage someone to not start sewing, but I would say that if you really like something intricate, and you aren't sure you could do it, it might be worth it to buy the item you like and then learn how to make it. I think Captain Schlork's response was honest, sewing is wonderful and fun, but if you expect immediate results you will probably be a little disappointed starting out.

Gonktastic
Jan 18, 2007



Honestly I've come to realize that unless you've got a lot of practice, good things are worth buying. Decent fabric (why would you homesew with anything else) a pattern and the extras end up costing quite a lot I've noticed. I decided not to buy the vest because I'd never end up wearing it.

I remember about 10 years ago, sewing what you wanted at home was a cheaper alternative. Now it costs as much, if not more, than plenty of things you can get in the store. It's a fun hobby for me, but when I want a gorgeous pencil skirt, I'll pick one up and pay for it.

Now for the burning questions: Why doesn't the collar for my dad's shirt sit right? everything seemed smooth and well fitting when i pinned it, but after sewing the collar on completely, it's bunched in one or two places. Tommy Bahama I am not!

Fino Martini
Jan 23, 2006



Captain Schlork posted:

This depends entirely on the material of the pullover. Find out what it is, then do some research on what dyes are available to you and if they're compatible with the material. If it's wool, it's best to just ditch the idea of machine dye since it'll probably gently caress up the material if you're not extra careful with it. Some brands (I honestly don't know what they sell over there) carry dyes that are specifically intended for sensitive organic textiles. When you finally have your dye, READ THE INSTRUCTIONS. Then read them again. And once again with a lot of thought. It's easy to mess up if you don't know exactly what you're doing and all brands have differences.

Always wash the dyed garment with similar colours. You'll probably have to re-dye it every now and then, black has the tendency of eventually fading.

Alright the materials of the pullover are 78% cotton, 22% polyester (exclusive of trim?)

I tried searching the sites of the two stores I mentioned, but didn't have much luck so I took it to google and found these two sites:

http://www.dharmatrading.com/html/eng/3796-AA.shtml?lnav=dyes.html

http://www.dharmatrading.com/html/eng/2238-AA.shtml?lnav=dyes.html

These are both cotton dyes for apparel so I think they would work. How many ounces of dye do you think I need for one garment?

From the first link I was thinking either the eggplant or the jet black, and for the second link I was thinking deep black (I'd wait for a restock or buy it from a different site.)

If you can't comment on the quality of those brands I'd be interested in hearing your recommendations for dyes.

Cat Fancier
Dec 3, 2006


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Cat Fancier fucked around with this message at 20:43 on Feb 16, 2018

Gonktastic
Jan 18, 2007



Captain Schlork posted:

You should do a mock-up every single time you make something beyond little accessories unless it's already a familiar pattern you've used. People ignore this a lot and mess up.
I wish I had. With the rate my scaled-down Dad shirt is going, it would have been cheaper going to Tommy Bahama.

squirrellypoo
Feb 8, 2003


ElanoreMcMantis posted:

Also, I really like the yellow dress too, but I agree that the hem needs work. Did you machine or hand sew it? I'm not saying this to be bitchy at all, so I hope it doesn't offend, but it doesn't look pressed enough. On the side seams did you sew in the ditch when you did them?
Your comments here are not offensive - they're constructive. Simply saying something sucks, without offering any advice or help, is really bitchy and has no place in this thread.

It probably isn't pressed enough - I used a press cloth but I think it probably should've been a bit thicker to cushion the 3 layers of fabric in the hem vs the one layer in the rest of the dress. I did the hem by hand and the stitching is faultless there (for once! God I hate hems, like a finaly, annoying hurdle between the real sewing and me wearing it!) - there's zero thread showing through on the right side, I only took up the tiniest amount from the back of the fabric. Because it was such a short hem, I actually took care with this one. I didn't stitch in the ditch at the side seams (I always do that for facings, but I never though to do it with hems, thanks!), but I did knot off my hem stitches whenever I got to a seam allowance, which was quite often on this one since it's the front panel, two side panels, and two back panels.

ElanoreMcMantis posted:

I tend to use my overlock to do the bottom edge, then iron that inward and up, and hand-sew the hem.
I pressed in about a quarter inch, straight stitched that, then hand-hemmed the folded edge in. I think it might just be that the thickness inside is a bit difficult to press right, though I'm open to suggestions on how to press with a cloth properly. Really, I'm not too fussed after seeing at least 40-50 hems in the V&A Golden Age of Couture exhibit that looked way more obvious than my yellow dress. And sewing and pressing isn't my life - I have a full time job, I'm training for a 10k, I live in a building site with no heating (it's 30F in my sewing room - my tailor's shears are so cold it hurts to touch them), and I have a varied social calendar. So putting things into perspective, I really don't mind if my hem is a bit wonky to wear for one night of partying.

Gonktastic posted:

How difficult would a lined vest be to make? I tried on this gorgeous bartendery type vest at Bebe and can't ever imagine paying $100 for something like that.
BurdaStyle's free Franzi vest pattern is pretty straightforward. Print it out, sew it up using an old bedsheet and see if you like the fit (if I'd do it again, I'd personally make it a little bit longer). If you don't like it, nothing lost. If you do, it only takes less than a yard of fabric and lining, so you'll still come out ahead. Though frankly, if you think sewing is only about saving money, you've missed the point entirely.

Gonktastic posted:

Now it costs as much, if not more, than plenty of things you can get in the store. It's a fun hobby for me, but when I want a gorgeous pencil skirt, I'll pick one up and pay for it.
Whereas I'll make one, as I know it'll fit me perfectly, come in the exact fabric I want, I can hide pockets for specific objects all over, and it'll last ten times longer than one I bought. And every single time I wear it, I'll feel good and remember about the time I made it. And for me, that's a thousand times better than just going and buying one.

Gonktastic posted:

Now for the burning questions: Why doesn't the collar for my dad's shirt sit right? everything seemed smooth and well fitting when i pinned it, but after sewing the collar on completely, it's bunched in one or two places. Tommy Bahama I am not!
When you say "bunched" do you just mean that in a few places you got a weird tuck in the stitching? I'm afraid that happens to the best of us. You can try just seam ripping the stitches around the tucks and smoothing it out and just resewing those places, but you may have to rip it out entirely and try again. It might be helpful to use your machine's basting stitches the first time through, then going back and sewing it regularly.

Or if that's not what you're talking about, could you post a photo of the affected area please?

Fino Martini posted:

Alright the materials of the pullover are 78% cotton, 22% polyester (exclusive of trim?)
I'm afraid the only dyes I'm familiar with are Dylon, and I'd be wary of using any hot water dyes on cotton for fear of shrinkage. Dylon's cold water dye says it works well on cotton but not as vivid on polyester, though... It might be worth asking the knitting people on craftster.org about this as they might have more experience in dying natural fibers.

ParserGirl
Jun 3, 2005



This thread should be a refuge from the all the sugar-coated sewing communities out there.

squirrellypoo posted:

Your comments here are not offensive - they're constructive. Simply saying something sucks, without offering any advice or help, is really bitchy and has no place in this thread.

It did come with advice: your hemline shouldn't be visible. If you were sewing this simply as practice, then I'd agree the comment was over the top - however, you wore this in public.

This is from the page you linked in your own post:

squirrellypoo's website posted:

I posted the first photo on another sewing place yesterday after people were begging to see it, and I got the following response:

“that hem is absolutely terrible. It shouldn’t be visible like that at all.”

No helpful advice, no “hey that invisible zipper is loving amazing and your 90 degree darts have no puckers and wow I can’t believe you made that fascinator”, just plain old bitchiness because I disagreed with this particular fashion school student that an overlocker is not 100% necessary for sewing knits. How bitchy and self-serving can you get…

I really don't think I saw anyone begging in this thread.

Lady googooGaGa
Nov 3, 2006

Are you freaking kidding me!?

In the best interest of everyone involved I think honesty will work best, and just as I wouldn't post a semi-beginner photoshop in GBS without expecting a certain level of criticism, nobody should post pictures in here if all they expect is compliments.

In the best interest of the thread I think we can let the whole hem comment thing die out now, because everyone involved has said their piece, and it would be really lovely to not have a thread at all over it. (Please?)

Cat Fancier
Dec 3, 2006


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Cat Fancier fucked around with this message at 20:44 on Feb 16, 2018

dopaMEAN
Dec 4, 2004


Captain Schlork posted:

(I don't see any darts on that dress, either.)

I think that's the idea. I can see them, but they blend really well.

Anyways- I finally got around to getting my zipper for my sweater, but while I was there, I picked up a pattern for a cute apron. I'm almost done with it, but I encountered a piece that has me confused.
Hopefully, I'll finish it up tonight, then I can finish my sweater.
I'd post pics, but we just got burglarized a second time, and officially have no cameras left.

Owlie
Jun 11, 2004
There wudn't no carnival! It was a damn freezer!

Hi, cool idea for a thread. I studied costume construction for a few years at university so this is right up my alley.

dopaMEAN posted:

Oh, and what is basting exactly? I keep thinking it's stitching it, but that doesn't make sense. I might try my hand at pinning my sweater together to get a nice fit on it.

Yes, basting is stitching, using large stitches that are easy to rip out. You can do it either by hand, or by using the longest stitch setting on your sewing machine. Basting allows for more precision than just pinning, and it enables you to do sort of a trial run--if you baste a seam, and you don't like it and want to take it out, it takes a lot less time to rip out long stitches than short stitches.

Squirrelypoo, that dress fits you beautifully. I think straight-stitching before hand-hemming might have added a bit of that bulk--I personally would have used Elanore McMantis' method, or alternately you could fold it up half an inch and press, then another inch or so in order to hide the raw edges, press again just on the crease, and hand-hem.

Gonktastic
Jan 18, 2007



Squirrly, it's just three spots where it tucks. At least they ended up pretty symmetrical!

I definitely will keep sewing fun things for myself- but when I see something really complex, gorgeous and well constructed I'll buy it instead of attempting it- for now.

RedFish
Aug 6, 2006
..blue fish, one fish, two fish: blue fish need not apply.

We were most definitely asking to see that dress.

In terms of moving on, SA or not, it will help to keep criticism constructive and not as personal as it's being made in here.

I'm not suggesting we start adding lolcats and toilet paper covers, but can we avoid scaring people off?

On-topic, I am dying to get my paper-tape dressform made so I can start tearin' poo poo up. All my potential assistants are in finals hell.

I'd like to get into painting designs on fabrics, but all the online resources I have dug up so far all seem obsessed with puff paint. Not my style. Is it better to look into silk screening?

RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga

Can anybody recommend fabric shops in NYC?

Moms Stuffing
Jun 2, 2005

the little green one

....I really want to see everyone's projects. It's my favorite part of all the knitting communities I'm a member of! It's really inspiring to me and makes me get off my butt and make something.

Speaking of making something, I am knitting this hat for myself in black, even though I would prefer another color. I already made one for a friend for X-mas and once she takes a picture of herself in it, I'll post it here. It's a stupid simple two needle hat.


Here's the pattern!

The pattern says to use size 8 needles, but I had to use a size 7 because I was unhappy with how loose the hat was looking. It fit perfectly and I have a big rear end head.

squirrellypoo
Feb 8, 2003


RichBomb posted:

Can anybody recommend fabric shops in NYC?
Metro Textiles always gets recommended really highly, though I haven't been there yet (someday!). I can't find an official site for them, but there's a good guide to NYC fabric shops here which lists their address and phone number.

Google Embryo posted:


Here's the pattern!
ooh, I love that! I'm always drawn to close-fitting cloche-esqe hats in stores but I can never quite get them to work with my hair.

Moms Stuffing
Jun 2, 2005

the little green one

squirrellypoo posted:

ooh, I love that! I'm always drawn to close-fitting cloche-esqe hats in stores but I can never quite get them to work with my hair.

Ha yeah I have really long hair right now, but I'm going to get it cut so that I look better in cute hats!

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Gently Used Coat
Jul 4, 2005



I'm glad this thread came up, because I've been interested in learning how to sew, even if I am too lazy to go out and get a machine.

In the meantime, though, I've been knitting this scarf to give to my father. It's my first cabling project, and I'm pretty excited about how well it's coming out. (That picture's not so great, here's the one that's used in the pdf.)

By the way, is anyone else here on Ravelry? It's kinda like a pattern/yarn manager, but you can also see what everyone else is doing with their yarn and projects. I didn't think it'd be that interesting when I first joined, but now it's taking up a pretty big chunk of my day.

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