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Lead out in cuffs
Sep 18, 2012

"That's right. We've evolved."

"I can see that. Cool mutations."



Do you mean you're trying to fold webbing over and stitch it down to increase the thickness? I think the point of that pattern is to take regular fabric and make it into a string by folding and stitching down. And the point of that is to make your drawstring pretty.

I wouldn't imagine that webbing would fold like that. I also can't imagine that it would look good as the drawstring of a bag. Are you committed to using it? Either using fabric, like in the pattern, or going to your local fabric store and getting 50c worth of cord, would be easier and look better.

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armorer
Aug 6, 2012

I like metal.

Pondex posted:

Is there any way to make a double-drawstring bag like this, without having the cords crossing each other inside the channel?



http://www.nicoleathome.com/2013/02/tutorial-double-drawstring-bag.html

I'm using some polyester webbing for mine (like 20mm wide seatbelt) and it kind of looks like garbage folded around itself. Maybe make the channel wider?

Sew two channels?

Lead out in cuffs
Sep 18, 2012

"That's right. We've evolved."

"I can see that. Cool mutations."



armorer posted:

Sew two channels?

Yeah this is what's confusing me about the OP's question. The pattern they linked literally has two channels. The only place the two cords meet is at the knots at the end.

Pondex
Jul 8, 2014



I'm using the webbing for the drawstrings. But there's two drawstrings running through each channel from opposite sides. And as far as I can figure out, they're always going to cross inside the channel and wrap around each other. Which I don't really care for.
Like this:


I may just need some thinner straps. Or a wider channel

ephphatha
Dec 18, 2009






If you're committed to using wide webbing having a single loop works at the cost of being slightly more awkward to close the bag. It also won't be as secure when closed.

Pondex
Jul 8, 2014



ephphatha posted:

If you're committed to using wide webbing having a single loop works at the cost of being slightly more awkward to close the bag. It also won't be as secure when closed.

The webbing doubles as shoulder-straps so I need two unfortunately.

Like this one:

Lead out in cuffs
Sep 18, 2012

"That's right. We've evolved."

"I can see that. Cool mutations."



Ah right, I see. Yeah one option would be two separate channels, one above the other.

Pondex posted:

The webbing doubles as shoulder-straps so I need two unfortunately.

Like this one:



... but the option of separate channels will look weird if this is your goal.

I don't think I've ever seen one of those beach bags with actual webbing/strap material. Usually they just use thick-ish soft cord for the shoulder straps (like in the picture), and work on the assumption that you won't be carrying anything heavy in them.

If you really want webbing straps, maybe try to make a design where the straps and bag closure aren't a single thing? Like just sew the straps into the seams and get some cord for the closure? It'd also be easier to put in strap adjusters.

armorer
Aug 6, 2012

I like metal.

Lead out in cuffs posted:

Ah right, I see. Yeah one option would be two separate channels, one above the other.

... but the option of separate channels will look weird if this is your goal.

I don't think I've ever seen one of those beach bags with actual webbing/strap material. Usually they just use thick-ish soft cord for the shoulder straps (like in the picture), and work on the assumption that you won't be carrying anything heavy in them.

If you really want webbing straps, maybe try to make a design where the straps and bag closure aren't a single thing? Like just sew the straps into the seams and get some cord for the closure? It'd also be easier to put in strap adjusters.

Yeah I meant two stacked channels so the webbing wouldn't ever be in the same path. I've made a number of bags like this myself, but never used wide webbing so I haven't run into this issue. With thin ribbon or cord it's a non-issue.

Pondex
Jul 8, 2014



I'm making a throw rug out of these cotton braids and I'm getting a knocking sound from my machine no matter what I do.



Any tips?

I've tried adjusting the thread-tension, presser-foot tension, changed the needle, changed the type of needle. So I'm stumped. It's a Singer 4411 so it should be strong enough.

learnincurve
May 15, 2014

Smoosh

Try lowering the feed dogs and see if that makes a difference, it could be slightly snarling up each time they move?

Pondex
Jul 8, 2014



learnincurve posted:

Try lowering the feed dogs and see if that makes a difference, it could be slightly snarling up each time they move?

As far as I can tell they're not adjustable on this machine. You can drop them completely for freehand sewing but that's it.

effika
Jun 19, 2005
Birds do not want you to know any more than you already do.

Does it knock when you crank by hand?

Does it knock when you use something like parchment paper with it?

Does it knock when you sew something thinner?

Does it knock when you try a different size or composition of thread?

learnincurve
May 15, 2014

Smoosh

Pondex posted:

As far as I can tell they're not adjustable on this machine. You can drop them completely for freehand sewing but that's it.

Thatís the kitty, drop them completely and try freehand to eliminate one moving part :)

Pondex
Jul 8, 2014



effika posted:

Does it knock when you crank by hand?

Does it knock when you use something like parchment paper with it?

Does it knock when you sew something thinner?

Does it knock when you try a different size or composition of thread?

1: Yes, if I move it fast.

2: If you mean paper between the fabric and feed dogs, then yes.

3: No.

4: I haven't tried another thread, but it's brand new gŁtermann polyester-thread.

Pondex
Jul 8, 2014



learnincurve posted:

Thatís the kitty, drop them completely and try freehand to eliminate one moving part :)

It doesn't make the sound sewing in place, but moving the fabric causes knocking again.

learnincurve
May 15, 2014

Smoosh

Pondex posted:

It doesn't make the sound sewing in place, but moving the fabric causes knocking again.

Ok good then itís not terminal or expensive. On my singer machine when Iím quilting it absolutely hates the bobbin being horizontal - it has auto tension and does this thing where it cuts out when you go too fast and it detects the thread is about to snap - having it upright tends to cut out this issue. I would wonder if your knocking is to do with same issue.

Naked Bear
Apr 15, 2007

Boners was recorded before a studio audience that was alive!


I have one of those Singers and experience the same knocking with heavier fabric and thread. I found two things: the first was the needle impacting the bobbin case. The more significant noise, though, was indeed related to thread tension, and bumping it up to 6 reduced the knocking. It does still knock a bit, but not quite so much at slower speeds.

I'm pretty sure that I'm missing something here and haven't found a definitive cause. I have a hunch that it's actually the little timing adjustment thing inside the head (?) of the machine (above the needle) that's the real source of the noise. (Not sure, haven't needed to pull the machine out recently and really dig into it.)

Pondex
Jul 8, 2014



Just did a test with 12 layers of a light cotton canvas. No issues or knocking at all. My machine must hate braids.

Lead out in cuffs
Sep 18, 2012

"That's right. We've evolved."

"I can see that. Cool mutations."



My totally pulled out my arse theory: the fabric is really stiff and angled in places in the braid, such that it's bending the needle just enough to make it bump into the bobbin case.

Pondex
Jul 8, 2014



Lead out in cuffs posted:

My totally pulled out my arse theory: the fabric is really stiff and angled in places in the braid, such that it's bending the needle just enough to make it bump into the bobbin case.

Yeah, it seems like the needle is deflecting, since the machine can sew a lot of straight layers easily. Maybe a beefy microtex-needle can solve it.

Killingyouguy!
Sep 8, 2014



If I wanted to make a cover for my ikea POANG where would I even start with that? Like I don't think there are patterns available for purchase so can I measure the cushions and just make big rectangles? What kind of fabric do I use for furniture?

learnincurve
May 15, 2014

Smoosh

Same principle as measuring for and assembling a cardboard box, but you got to add on an inch all round to give yourself seam room and some give.

Iím a rank amateur and I always do these things super slow. Measure cushion area, add on inch, cut out, measure back area, add inch, cut out and so on till I got all the bits ready to assemble.

Fabric would depend on your machine, singer heavy duty would go through very heavy denims but a more average machine Iíd go for a heavy cotton.

Arsenic Lupin
Apr 11, 2012

This particularly rapid unintelligible patter isn't generally heard, and if it is, it doesn't matter.





Killingyouguy! posted:

If I wanted to make a cover for my ikea POANG where would I even start with that? Like I don't think there are patterns available for purchase so can I measure the cushions and just make big rectangles? What kind of fabric do I use for furniture?

First measure them and make big rectangles. REMEMBER TO ADD SEAM ALLOWANCES ON ALL SIDES. Then buy some cheap fabric from Joanne's/Michael's bargain bin, baste together (loose stitches either by hand or by machine) a cover and see if it fits.

You get upholstery fabric either in the "home decor" section of your fabric store or online. I've been happy with everything I got from fabric.com (sorry to see they're an Amazon company now :( ) and they'll send you swatches.

Olothreutes
Mar 31, 2007



Hello sewing thread, I have a question that I'm pretty sure I know the answer to but would rather have more knowledgeable input on.

I want to sew some masks, it's been ages since I've used a sewing machine. I was passable at it like... 20+ years ago. I have two sewing machines available to use. One is a Singer 2932, which I'm pretty sure is a flimsy plastic thing that has never worked particularly well since I bought it. The internet seems to agree with me. I also inherited my grandmother's Singer 457, which weighs an absurd amount and was made in Great Britain, not China.

I probably want to use the 457, right? Assuming that it actually works, I've not plugged it in to try it since it arrived.

learnincurve
May 15, 2014

Smoosh

Yes absolutely, under the skin and dials itís near enough identical to the singer heavy duty. The 2932 is part of a series thatís dogshit at multiple layers.

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HelloIAmYourHeart
Dec 29, 2008

Send us signals in the glow
of night windows



Fallen Rib

Arsenic Lupin posted:

buy some cheap fabric from Joanne's/Michael's bargain bin

Thrift store sheets are my go-to for this sort of thing.

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