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Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

Hey ladies and gents! I'm excited we have a sewing thread now.

I'm a Crafts/Fibers major at the moment, so I'm pretty constantly sewing--most of my stuff is not really wearable or practical at all though. In fact it's largely awfully uncomfortable. But I love it, I'm one of the only students in my major that do garments at all, everyone else does sculpture or objects or what not. Boo.

Anyway. Some stuff from this semester:


Experiment in creating constructed surfaces with fabric.

Simple t-shirt remix/dye. I like solid bright colors and shape I guess

Excuse the awful photo in my living room, I haven't got back a good picture yet. My big piece this semester, it has an jumper, shirt, shoes, and hat that go with it. All in lovely shades of magenta, safety orange and tennis-ball green. It's also fully reversible, and the other side is neon gree. I beat out seniors and juniors (I'm a sophomore) for a spot at the Philadelphia Flower Show. Yay! It almost makes the hours of hand-stitching those tunnels and actually wearing it (it weighs about 15 pounds) worth it!

Oh, and I do sometimes make real clothes! This one isn't terribly well crafted, sorry, I just whipped it up yesterday for kicks--winter break is boring!


And sometimes I do embroidery too. Last one, I promise, I just get overly excited about Fibers~!

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Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

DeliciousDarkness posted:

Sup Philly goon :) what school? I go to Moore. Congrats on that btw... your work is really interesting.
Hey there! I very-nearly-almost went to Moore! I'm actually at The University of the Arts. And thanks--it was a crazy competition, the juniors and seniors had over a month to work on their pieces, and the head of our department decided to let us participate with only 2.5 weeks until judging.

ps: really dumb question, but is it true that Moore sucked all the queer girls out of Uarts? Because they don't exist here :smith:

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

st. vitus shimmy posted:

Judging by your other work, I'm about 99.9% sure that this is a completely original design that you made your own patter for, but on the magical off-chance that it was made from a mass produced pattern, I would be all rainbows and puppies over you if you told me how to find it.

Awww man, I want some rainbows and puppies. But yeah, I just sort of botched it together. The top is just based off a plain, fitted t-shirt (I appliqued the bib on, it's not a seperate piece) and the bottom is a pretty simple 4-gore flared skirt.

edit: I actually can't work from commericial patterns anway, I usually don't even make a paper pattern for myself because I am a bad, bad person and I cut directly into my cloth.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

I know this will probably just land me on goons.jpg or 'pyf picture that makes you laugh everytime,' but I just got my professional pictures back from last semester. So I just ask you to remember these are really art pieces and not everyday wear!


My flower-show piece. Go see it if you're in Philly and you like flowers.

Decoy Heart


Jacket inspired by clams at Reading Terminal Market

One semester down, one to go! I'm making twelve t-shirts out of shower curtains and old t-shirts right now. And a dress out of glue-stiffened crochet.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

squirrellypoo posted:

Hey, I'd actually wear the last jacket! :)
Nice! I made a dress out of a shower curtain last summer (the cloth-type shower curtain, not the plastic kind) and it's been featured in like 12 international newspapers and magazines so far, without any kind of work on my end. Things made from shower curtains are a hot item and make reporters drool for some reason.

I'm using the nasty awful clear plastic kind. But it's working out okay, I quilted one and stuffed it with shredded t-shirts, and it's surprisingly nice looking.

And that's awesome! My only claim to fame is the Philly Inquirer, shoot.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

^^You could just sort of notch them at the corners so you can fold them down. Putting a little facing in it might look neater though.

If any of you folks would be entertained by following along as I make riduculous, unwearable crap, I just started a blog for all to watch. Science experiments are currently on-going as I attempt to make a dress and crystallize it into rock candy.

Having Horns- http://havinghorns.blogspot.com

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

Not an Anthem posted:

Goldaline, your poo poo rocks, I like the tunnel dress.

I have a question about embroidery.. how hard is it to transfer a really random asymmetrical image into an embroidered one on a sweater? Are there online tutorials to learning embroidery?

Ha, thank ya! I actually set it up at the Philly Flower Show this morning.

And for embroidery, I've always found tracing paper is amazing. Trace your pattern, tape the tracing paper to the fabric, and stitch through both it and the fabric. Then tear away the tracing paper. Woo.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear


I just finished this piece for my last Projects project. 50 hours of embroidery and pain. Never working with velvet again--I had to use pliers to get the floss through the fabric at the seams.

But it got into a juried exhibit/sale to take place this weekend, so it was all worth it.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

Drimble Wedge posted:

Goldaline, that is seriously amazing. I'd love to see closeup pics of the bodice.

Here's some I snapped. I'm hoping to get some professional ones taken before I ship it out.




No picture of the back, its all lumpy right now because I had to pin it to fit my ridiculously sized mannequin.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

Not an Anthem posted:

Goldaline, your poo poo is ridiculous, do you have an online portfolio to look through? Very awesome.

I really, really need to get off my rear end on that and make a website. Unfortunately, my HTML knowledge ended in like, 1999. So I'm kind of dreading it.

I do have a blog, where I talk about what I'm working on at school, my processes, ect, it's http://www.havinghorns.blogspot.com . I usually have photos of my final works on there too.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

huplescat posted:

I hope this hasn't already been covered, but how easy/practical is it to reverse engineer clothing?

The reason I ask is my work pants are slowly dying after 3 years of constant use and I really need a new pair. The shop they come from sells the same design still, but they only have lovely fabric this season and I refuse to pay $200+ for that. The ones I have are a wool mix and I got them half price at $100 so I ain't paying double for crap no matter how nice they look.

So is it possible? I don't want to have to pull them apart either, but I guess that's an option when they're so worn they're unwearable.

This is essentially how I learned to make clothing--I've never been much for commercial patterns, I just take things apart and learn how to make basic shapes from them. You shouldn't have to pull them apart--lay them flat and trace them out on some muslin or junk fabric with a similar weight, and use that to make a prototype that you can alter, then make a final paper pattern and find the actual fabric that you like.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

So unfortunately all of my end-of-semester photos were given to me in slide-only form, but here's a shot-of-a-shot of my favorite piece this year:



The quilting on this was a monster, it took me nearly 3 weeks. I was embroidering that son of a bitch until about 11 at night the night before my critique. All the construction and piping and lining was done from the hours of 11 to 7, just in time for some chipped beef at a diner and a 8:30 critique.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

I've never had the patience to use those decorative stitches~they take too long, and I like doing stuff by hand rather more. But I have seen them used really cutely on necklines or sleeve cuffs, or in repeated stripes on a skirt.

I finally got my slides scanned in for my final project, the idea was to make a 'relic.'


The holes are for horns, it's a jacket for a young boy with horns. A lot of my work is narrative or situational (let me know if I should shift my stuff to creative convention or something, I know it's not really fashion-based)

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

Not an Anthem posted:

Goldaline, you're probably super busy with work but would you consider doing custom work?

edit, if curious email mattus at gmail

Email sent, curious to see what you're looking for!

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

baptism of fiber posted:

Does anyone know if enzyme washing can be done at home? A while back I visited a clothing store that bought up tacky t-shirts from thrift stores and washed them in some enzyme that made them super soft and thin. I'd like to try this process on some surplus clothing with the goal of 1) fading the camoflage pattern somewhat, 2) making the material feel softer. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

I hate dumbass stores like that. If you don't particularly want to gently caress up your washing machine, I wouldn't do it in there, but salt can beat up fabric pretty well, as will dilute bleach.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

I just got done with the Punk Rock Flea Market in Philadelphia. It was crowded and hot, but totally worth it.


(my table and my two partners in crime)

I sold a fair amount of stuff (mostly the really kitschy crap, hipsters seem to eat that stuff up) and even got a little mention on the Philebrity blog: http://www.philebrity.com/2008/06/27/phashionista-punk-rock-flea-market-edition/ Woo, I'm ambitious and 'almost couturish' whatever the hell that means.

Now I'm scrambling to make more stuff for craft fair on the 12th!

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

RedFish posted:

I've got some ignorant questions to ask that the fabric glossary in the OP didn't cover: Can someone explain to me what 'stretch twill' is?

Also, I take it that quilting cotton is much thinner than apparel cotton, but sometimes I find quilting cotton lumped under apparel even though there is a separate quilting section. Can it be used for apparel as well? I'm dying for a skirt in some of the quilting prints out there.

Thanks.

A twill is any woven fabric where the weft travel over 2 or more warp threads. The most common twill you probably see everyday is denim--the tiny diagonal lines in denim are indicative of a simple 2/2 even twill. So probably that, with some spandex or lycra thrown in.

Eh...I mean, you probably could, but it's thin, and flimsy, and doesn't drape well at all.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

Milk-Eyed Mender posted:

Hallloween is a longgg way away. But of course, i've already started picking out my costume. I love the character from Pan's Labyrinth who has his eyes on his hands. I attached a picture of him below. Anyways, I'd love to be him for Halloween. I figured I would wear a tan bodysuit, but i really want all the sags and wrinkles he has. Any ideas for what I should do?



Hope this isn't off the threads topic, I'm just curious for some tips.

OOh,what a great idea for a costume. Hmm, it might be worth investing in two body suits, one that is actually your size, and one that's too big. You could tack or quilt the too-big on to the tight one, and use a little bit of batting to flesh out the wrinkles?

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

RedFish posted:


Lastly, I'm currently painting a skirt. I'm using Tulip Sosoft paints because it's all that Joann's had, and a pair of black and white Scribblers which I've learned the hard way to just squeeze out and use with a brush. I wanted to start small before I got ahead of myself and spent a ton of money on paints online. I'm reminded of how much I hate working with acrylics in general, and fabric paint just compounds their fatal flaws, but I'm hoping it's just the quality of the brands I'm working with. Does anyone have a favourite brand of fabric paint of which they could sing praises?

Patterns always suck. Toss them out and draft your own from clothes you have. Totally worth it.

And cheapest/best method I've found? Get some textile medium (liquitex makes one, as does delta) and mix it with craft-grade acrylics. Heat set with an iron when you're done. Or if you're feeling fancy you could use thickened dyes, which is what I generally use, the process is a total pain in the rear end, but it gives you really nice color quality and doesn't get stiff like paint.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

RedFish posted:

Thickened dyes? Interesting, I must know more! Do you just gradually add water to powdered dyes until you have a fluid paste? How easily do they layer? Do they blend as you paint like a watercolour would? Do you use mordant as you go? Is there anyway to treat the fabric around it to keep the edges from bleeding? Do you think cutting out a design in waxed paper and then ironing it onto the garment beforehand might keep the dyes from bleeding?

Thanks for the paint tip; I'll have to try that next. When you say craft-grade acrylics, though, do you mean like a fine art acrylic or the kind you'd use to paint knicknacks?

And hells yes on the pattern suckage. The amount of tinkering, darting, pinning, and altering they take not to scream 'handemade clothing!' is retarded, and trying to fit it on yourself without a dressform shaped like you is impossible. I actually went into the bathroom at one point, for the mirror, to add some front darts and called my guy in to stand behind me and hold my boobs up out of the way so I didn't have to lean over to see what I was doing. Eurgh.

Noo, less water would just make ridiculously strong dye that would spread everywhere. https://www.prochemical.com makes a print paste and a thickener, either of which you use with a 4:1 water/urea solution to make a lovely snot-like goo that you mix with your watered-down dyes. Add some soda ash or baking soda to fix it. I haven't really used it for painting, mostly for screen printing and warp-painting, but it gives you lovely intense colors on cotton or silk. It won't work on polyester though, and you can only work with dark on light. I think they would blend somewhat, they blend together when you immersion dye. The more thickener you add the less it will bleed--which is how I can use it for screen printing things like below.




Or when doing a warp-painting (the "plaid" stripes going horizontally were painted before the warp went on the loom, and they fade as the go up)

Click here for the full 2048x1536 image.


And I'm staunchly anti-dart. Screw that noise. Thankfully I don't really make tailored garments, because I don't have the patience for that sort of thing.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

trinity3infinity posted:

Hi, I'm new to this thread and was hoping that some more experienced sewers could give me some pointers about pattern drafting. I've done a few projects on my own, but always with a pattern bought from my local craft store. I've recently have become inspired to do a cartoonish version of rogue for halloween. Here's what she looks like:



I was wondering:

- What is the standard seam allowance? I know I should add some length and I usually do a 3/8" allowance when sewing unless another is indicated in the pattern that I am following.

- I have an idea of how to do darts based on previous experience, but considering that I will be using a spandex type fabric I am unsure if darts will be necessary.

- Since it's been a while since I've worked with stretch fabric and I don't remember what type of needle I should use to use with my machine.

- I can remember a method on doing sleeves, but again, since this is stretch fabric, does anyone have any good ideas on how I could do a sleeve with spandex and have it appear smooth?

Thanks in advance to any pointers anyone has.

I doubt you'll need to use any darts. Look for a good 4-way stretch spandex, and you'll need ball point needles for your machine.

I know I work in the worst way (woo for no concept of 'proper' garment making) but here's how I'd go about it. Got a pair of cotton (sewn) leggings? Good. Got a tight, stretchy long sleeve t-shirt? Great. Use these as your base. Get some big butcher paper, and lay it all out. I would trace out the leggings first, then sort of 'attach' the shirt at the point where the leggings and shirt would meet on your body. You'll end up with a seam up the mid-back and mid front of the 'shirt' part, just add that in. Then take your new butcher paper pieces and mark where it's black and where it's yellow. It looks like black 'gusset' sort piece on the side will eliminate the side seam there, you'll end up with some odd sort of princessy seam.
And then, um, cut and sew? Serging would be way more secure though, I'd think.

I'm sorry if that didn't totally make sense, I'm awful at explaining things. Let me know if you can't find a pre-made pattern, or if someone else doesn't have an easier way and I'll draw something up to make it more clear.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

LasterTrain posted:

Stupid Backpack alteration/making questions:

Is riveting cordura fabric to cordura fabric, or to nylon webbing, likely to last?

I have no sewing experience whatsoever. If the only sort of 'sewing' I ever plan to do is making and altering backpacks and the related nylon webbing, and possibly heavy canvas and thin leather webbing, is there a specific sort of sewing machine that handles these sorts of thick and stiff fabric?

Is there somewhere to learn sewing? Is it offered as an adult education class somewhere? Are there classes offered by manufacturers? Can I appretice somewhere to learn?

I am a complete newbie so I am perfectly willing to listen to any advice, even if it is just to tell me I have no idea what I am talking about. I am just sick of having backpacks fail on me, and just want to be able to fix them, and possibly make them from scratch.

If these sorts of projects are beyond the skill of a beginner like me, how do I find a alterations shop that can deal with these rough heavy fabrics?

Where do I find cordura, webbing, and 'truck tarp' as new raw materials? Truck tarp seesm to be a name for the layer of waterproofing that is sewn into many 'messenger' style bags. I have no idea what it actually is.

Your best bet would be to look at your local community center, they often have sewing lessons--or even a sewing group in your town. Have any patient friends that like to sew?

And it sound like you need an industrial machine if you're going to be using lots of layers of tough fabrics--we have one at my school that can go through multiple layer of leather no problem.

And I just did a quick google search--these people seem to specialize in tough outdoors fabrics: http://www.ahh.biz/catagories/fabric.htm

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

4R7 THi3F posted:

it's called the grim reaper goes to the beach


Hahahaha, the pose really makes this awesome.


I've been hard at work on things that are marginally related to fashion and sewing.


Click here for the full 518x1153 image.

Like ruffled red long johns for those special mornings when you leap out of bed and do the cha-cha.

I've also made a chair in the likeness of my college's president. It's sitting in his office, terrifying his secretary. If you flip the cushion, he's smiling on the other side. This is his stern face.

And of course, a giant ball made of sweater that I climbed into and somersaulted down the runway at my school's experimental costume show. Obviously.


More crappy crappy crappy and how it's done at mah bloggy blog blog~

PS: I'm totally trying out for a MTV reality show that apparently has something to do with fashion next week. Wanna gently caress dat poo poo up.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

4R7 THi3F posted:

Oh, man! You're doing that!! I was thinking about going to the casting call, but I'm too busy with finals

That chair is amazing

Yeah! I'm surprised they called me for an interview. I basically said I love how tacky and ridiculous MTV is, and that it would be the ultimate absurd sort of Dadaist performance art for me.

They told me to bring some work, so I'm rounding up all the fibers girls and putting them in costume to drag down there with me.

And I know what you mean, I probably shouldn't be doing it. I don't think I've gotten more than 4 hours of sleep any night this week. Just two to go~

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

doot doot doot made an eyeball skirt over winter break. Now I'm back to school hell and covering a barber chair in weave and such other things that don't really count as 'sewing and diy fashion'

But here's an eyeball skirt, dramatically modeled by my mate Astrid~



The back, it's a total mess inside, but the placket looks okay from the outside I guess.


Hand quilted velvet hem~


And some lovely fringey eyeballs


Yep. Now I'm going to go back to making balls out of shower curtains and powdered t-shirts.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

4R7 THi3F posted:







Ah, it's a thing of beauty~! I hate my machine, it's some early 90's Janome that doesn't work for poo poo past 'straight stitch' and nearly vibrates itself off the counter. Some spoiled brat in my home town sold it to me for $30 because her mom was buying her a new one.

I really want either an old machine like that or one of those new computerized Bernina's. I got to use one at the studio of a seamstress I was helping out and it was amazing.

PS: seriouslywtf, I love the ottoman! I'm getting really into upholstery at the moment. I'll post the Hair-Chair when it's finished!

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

Triangulum posted:

Can anyone recommend some sites with patterns similar to Sublime Stitching? I used to do embrodery when I was younger but got pretty fed up with the fruity patterns.

Also, Goldaline I loving love everything you make. Good lord woman, you're talented.

I draw my own stuff out mostly, but try tattoo designs (line drawn, nice for stitching) or I sort of love this site http://etc.usf.edu/clipart/index.htm It's for teachers, but it has some really odd black and white clip art.

And thanks! Though I am trying to not be so much of a woman these days~


So the hair chair is completed!

So. Much. Weave.

Bonus shot in progress. I was using hair-elastics to hold back the hair as I was working.

Before shots and more info is on my blog~

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

Triangulum posted:

Tattoo flash was pretty much exactly what I was wanting, thanks.

Are you trans now? Or am I taking you way too literally?

E: Some of the math clipart is really cool and would make great stitching. Check this baby out: http://etc.usf.edu/clipart/36700/36736/sine4_36736_lg.gif

Yah, I really like some of the odder diagrams they have--especially the science ones.

No, haha, I was being literal. Pre-everything because I'm a starving student, but yeah, I've considered myself trans for a while now. I try not to make a fuss about it on the forums because helldump already has my number for the weirder garments I make.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

Triangulum posted:

Helldump's actually the most tolerant forum on SA as far as transsexuality, homosexuality, etc goes. Good luck with your transition :) .

You may have a point there, which is even more scary. And thanks~!

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

teknicolor posted:

weave is generally not real hair

Good weave is--I got to learn a whole lot about hair extensions working on this.

It's actually about half and half. The blonde and sandy blond on the top and the two darkest shades are real, the rest is fake. The blonde up at the top was the worst, it was so damaged and gross feeling.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

Guys, I have two life-sized robots that need to be done by sunday, and my sewing machine just poo poo the bed completely. :( :( I've been lugging the material back and forth from my studio to the sewing room across the street.


Not to mention I can't afford a new one anytime soon.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

I've been makin' stuff, but some dickant stole my camera. So here's some stuff.

Bag made of old boots, army uniforms, other second-hand materials.





Yay it's a surprise inside.

I made some pants too, and I've started on this thingy:

Yay italian cording feathers.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

I hope my posting in here is okay, I know I'm not exactly sewing real clothes for real people. Let me know if I should move it to Creative Convention (although I feel out of place there too. Oh, Fibers, forever straddling the line between commercial and fine art. :( so many arguements about that all the time)

Reconstruction's the name of game now. Starting to get ready for my senior year and senior thesis.

Pants were formerly a pair of standard issue olive green 1960's French army pants and one white shetland wool sweater. Both were dyed grey, sweater was felted. I cut apart the waist band and opened the darts on the pants to create sort of paper bag type waist. Pulled in the extra fabric on the sides and gathered it into a sweater insert, embroidered inside the cable work on the sweater. Pieces are joined with a herringbone stitch in crewel wool The back belt is joined the same way, with crewel laid work. Unfortunately, I took in a little bit too much on the thighs/butt--but I'm hoping I can get a skinny guy to wear them for me, my mate Betty is standing in here, so they fit a bit odd on her.




Poof butt. Sweet.

I also made some sweet robots for a local band that wanted them for their stage show. It was a challenge, because they needed to be able to be broken down and taken with them on tour, and cost less than $50 each. I decided to make PVC frames with fabric "slip covers" that velcroed on. Unfortunately, I lost my camera while making them, so I don't have too many pictures.


PVC frames, I ended up having to drill holes in all the connectos, because they don't make a 4 way 90 degree connector at 1"

Heads made of dollar store baskets. They specified that the robots look a bit "duhh" Sheer panels on the side are so they can be mic'ed and sing while inside the bots--yes, they perform inside them for part of their act!

Happy customers! Yay!

Goldaline fucked around with this message at 02:28 on May 1, 2009

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

Awww man. That would have been good to know. I don't know that I would have time or money to get those particular ones--but in case I ever build more robots, now I know.

It's always nice when totally obscure work knowledge is useful!

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

Summertime means cramming some new techniques down my throat

Always meant to learn cathedral window quilting--decided to try it in wool. Protip: don't. It looks really nice and is super dimensional, but good lord it's difficult to press into shape.

It'll eventually be the bodice of a dress--the skirt was an opportunity to try out needlace:


I wish I had gotten a picture of my final piece for Projects, but in all the stress, I forgot, and now it's locked up in the school building :(: Here's an inprogress shot, imagine the cording going all the way around, having a mesh back, and embroidered in shades of red and peach on the inside.



And I tried to come up with some little things to sell. I made some of these wool rings, and I'm working on some little stuffed philosophers (Jean-Paul Sartre is so ugly-cute~)


And I'm working on tiiiny quilts, but no picture yet.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

Okay, so I went and snuck into school to steal my piece back (and to scope out the studios for next year, I'm ready to fight for a big one!) Here's some awful pictures with the first girly I could find to model.

Here's the outside:

Click here for the full 516x820 image.


Click here for the full 552x643 image.


Click here for the full 585x940 image.


Inside-Out:

Click here for the full 489x766 image.


Click here for the full 531x847 image.


I have a little issue with the fastening in the back I've still got to work out--didn't happen on the mannequin, and this is the first time it's actually been on someone...whoops.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

Ozma posted:

I know you're hardcore and all but goddamn, do you have a deathwish?

Of course, I'm the laziest quilter in the world so I shouldn't make fun...

:(: I think I do. Now I'm trying it in silk organza for shits and giggles. And maybe I'll de-gum it and turn it into china silk when I'm done.

I also have 3 scrappy quilt-tops in progress to get rid off all the freaking quilt fabric people have given me over the years. And getting a head-start on my senior show.

I am a loser~

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

I have these in progress right now...I got a ton of little scraps from my professor's mother I'm trying to go through, plus all the old sheets/pillowcases I've accquired, so they're pretty scrappy looking.

'fancy stripe'

'string piecing'
I'm also trying to thiox (hell-bleach)a pair of pants tonight too, wish me luck~

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

Nione posted:

I've been wanting to try a quilt, but don't have access to a quilting machine and don't really want to pay someone to do it for me, so that cathedral pane quilt has me intrigued. I think I'm going to give it a try, only problem is I'll have to do it by hand as I don't have a functioning regular sewing machine either (for the moment, anyway). Is this an unfinished project waiting to happen? When you guys quilt, how much do you do by hand? I'm not a super fast hand sewer, but I'm adequate. I also wanted to include batting in between the layers of fabric, good idea?

Also, I really like the idea of having every single square be different. Any suggestions for places to get really super cool remnants or charm packs? I looked through a lot of the ones at Fat Quarter Shop and really like some of the fabrics but I'm open to suggestions, especially for really good deals or vintage fabrics.

The stuff I've been doing just to get rid of fabric I machine pieced for speed, but the cathedral window and some other things I'm working with I've done by hand, because the wool was too thick, and hand stitching worked better. I'll quilt all of them by hand. It doesn't seem like too much to me, but I'm used to spending 50-60 hours embroidering a lot of my pieces, so...uh..

I'm cheap as anything--I get my fabric from thrift stores. Pillowcases and sheets are good sources, they've usually got some cool prints on older ones. And as ghoulish as it might seem, well, when old ladies die, I guess the families donate their collections, that's where I've gotten a lot of mine. Then again, I really, really hate most of the newer fabrics I see.

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Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

Black clothing fades because you wash them so often, I don't think you'd have too much of an issue with a bed spread unless you wash it way too much.

Traditionally, 100% cotton is used for quilting...obviously, I don't personally hold to that, but the back ground really ought to be something light enough to press with an iron. For the middle squares, I think you could probably use anything.

Enjoy some crappy photobooth pictures because I can't find my camera's cord.

Starting my organza version. I think I'm going to make the centers more organza dyed in a gradation of gray.

I spent a few days tracking down this pattern. The squares are 2" and all wool. I think I'm making this into a vest or coat in 3 years when I've put it all together, hahaha.

Using these techniques in clothing finally! The braid was made of tiny scraps from a failed project, I sat there and hand-pieced them at work. The shirt is a reconstruction of an army surplus.

Found a pair of my favorite cut of jeans for $10, but they were black, and I have this weird problem with black jeans. So I threw them in Thiox (like bleach, but not, it smells like a perm) and bam, tan pants.

And for 4R7 THi3F especially, part of my sewing/needle arts book collection. Reader's Digest and Better Homes and Gardens books are the best! Right now I'm investigating Hardanger Work, Huck Embroidery, Bobbin Lace..summer is too short!

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