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Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear


Really slap-dash design wall has gone up for my Dear Jane so I can pick colors more easily and not get a blob of red or purple somewhere. I've since finished out Row C and started on D.

And the reversible braid patchwork strips are coming together! I finally have one long enough that you can actually see both sides at once. A whole bunch of these will eventually make a coat that's all grey wool on the outside and a gradient of blue/green/purple silks on the inside.

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Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

Madlilnerd--Great quilt! It reminds of me of traditional japanese indigo quilts. I bet it's super heavy and cozy too.

I've been busy teaching a highschool experimental costume class, but I've manage to work on a few things.


My colorwash Irish Chain quilt is growing! I don't think I quite realized how big it was going to be though. No clue how I'm going to lay it out to baste it.


I did a quick Hawaiian-sort of shirt in white broad cloth to show my students how to ice dye. I know the hem's a little wonky, that's what I get for slapping it together in a few hours. But it was neat to dye it in class then wear it to the next session.


And my Braid-coat is now sort of looking recognizable. The mid-point of the long strips is basically the shoulder seam. The end of the short strips between them is the neck line. It's like a big vest laid flat with the side seams open. Can't wait to start putting it together, just 5 strips left.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

Not an Anthem posted:

Awesome stuff as usual. Where would I get started making shirts like that?

I'm a big cheapo so I just trace off things I own that I like the fit of. This was pretty much unmodified from a sweet Liz Clairborne hawaiian shirt I have from the 90's.

If you're asking about the ice dying there's a good write up about it [url="https://"http://www.bloombakecreate.com/2011/02/ice-dyeing/"]here.[/url]

Update: the Irish Chain quilt is about 5/6th done, so close! I think I'm just going to back it with muslin, I looked at buying fabric for the back and it was like $30. Nope, already paying for the batting, that's quite enough thanks.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

Dammmmmn this is a big quilt.

It's just about 109" (9 feet!) square, I don't know how in god's name I'm going to baste it together! I might bring it to school and use our 15-foot fabric printing tables.

But I love it! Hoping against hope I can get it quilted before it gets cold, but that's a whole lot of hand-quilting!

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

I'm really dedicating myself to making most of the clothes I want for fall (okay, with a little bit of thrifting too, but no new purchases!) So I really wanted another light jacket, and I happen to love the jean jacket that I already own, so I traced it out. Since people have sort of been interested in that, here's basically how I do it--I also teach highschoolers how to do this in my Experimental Costume class, but it's so much easier to *show* rather than *explain* these things.


I just use regular tracing paper--turn the clothing inside out, and pick a pattern piece. Make sure that piece is perfectly flat. The rest of the garment can be all contorted, just get the piece you are tracing flat.

Lay the tracing paper on top and secure in place with weights or pins, and just use the ridge of the existing seam to draw out your pattern (obviously, you can add seam allowances later, I tend not to put SA on my patterns, instead adding them to the fabric after I've traced out the pattern) I use a light colored pencil initially, then go back with a french curve and ruler and clean the lines up with a darker color.

On sleeves or other things that you couldn't possibly 'lay flat,' I lay it so that half is flat, then pin the tracing paper to the very top fold of the sleeve (along the shoulder) trace that half half, then use those pins as a 'hinge' and flip to the other side of the sleeve and trace the other half.


Original and 'Replica'. The fabric on the replica was some sort of upholstery fabric I think (from the thrift store) and it was horrible to work with, it shifted and warped and frayed. But I think I locked it all down pretty well. I did not replicate the weird little diagonal front pockets because they're pretty useless.


Wearing it! I look miserable because it's way too hot for a jacket. The pockets are sticking up a little oddly. Hoping once I get the snaps on (they're in the mail as we speak) they'll stay down better. But I'm pretty pleased overall!


Also made a couple little totes for my/my boyfriends lunch, forgot to get a picture of his, it's denim with that awful/wonderful safety orange tape I found at JoMar.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

meche posted:

I have bags of jeans also! I'm itching to turn them into a quilt. I have the denim needle ready and all.

Have been working on the below instead though:





So many quilts, so little time.


Ahh! I love the bottom one--I think gray is under utilized in quilts! I guess I should update ya'll on the Dear Jane Quilt From Hell.


I'm juuuuust about halfway through. So, you know, only a couple more years to go. All hand piece/appliqued. Starting to think about sashing/borders now. I don't want to use black, I'm deciding between medium gray or chocolate brown. Thoughts?



The Irish Chain quilt has been declared 'done enough' so I can start using it for the summer. I didn't get to finish all of the medallions in the center of the gray blocks, but I figure I can do it in the winter when I switch over to a heavier blanket.



One of the medallions that is finished.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

Cute tu-tu! Hopefully everyone posts their Halloween sewing projects here--I'm hopefully going to finish up a Starfleet uniform this week, we'll see. Other things I've been messing around with lately:



Saw camo pants everywhere this summer, decided to make a pair for myself. Added a little floral contrast cuff because why not?


Another western shirt--the purple cloth was originally a men's xxl button up that I salvaged. I'm going to taper the sleeves next time I use this pattern though--they're so wide! Please excuse the half-finished tattoo.


Moving into fall, saw in stores lots of quilted sweater/sweatshirt things, decided to give that a go. I like quilting right through tracing paper better than trying to transfer to cloth. Also a salvaged thrift-store find--old tan XL sweatshirt cut down to size.


I did some corded quilting (I think it's also called Italian Quilting?) where you thread cord through 'channels' in the stitching. It worked quite well, and I'm already wearing it a lot.


My mad experiment this season? Buying all the bathing suits at the thrift store at the end of the season, when they're about $.50 a piece, cutting them into 2.5" squares, and making nine-patches out of them. I wanted to see if I could create yardage that way that you could still use as a stretch material--and you can! I was worried the serger seams would get too stiff.


And that, of course (?) led to this. Combining my love of patchwork quilting with my love of garish work-out clothes. Pleased as punch that everything lined up pretty well. It's fully lined (to avoid uncomfortable seams against skin) Just wish I had access to a coverstitcher to finish edges, I had to improvise the top and bottom edges. Any recommendations for a serious but not horrendously expensive serger/coverstitcher duo?

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

That leather sewing set up looks sick! I'm really trying to save up for a serger/coverstitcher set up right now, very jealous of people with such professional equipment. I think that a zipper foot is really probably your best bet, it'll keep you snugged up in the ditch of that seam.

So, I think I've finally figured out a drop-crotch pattern/alteration that I like. I kept trying on ones in the store that were too gathered at the waistband and made me look like a pumpkin, so I took it into my own hands.


I took a pair of large old lady linen pants, and cut off the bottoms of the legs. Then I split the inner leg seam open and used the fabric from the bottom to make a melon shaped gusset. Then I took off the waist band, made a button fly at the center front seam, tapered in the outer side seams, made a pleat, and stuck the waistband back on. And put some cuffs on the bottom of the leg. It probably would have been faster to just start with yardage, but hey the pants were only $1, and I learned some things.


I wouldn't wear them tucked in with that shirt, but just so you can see them under there. Still have to put the buttons on though. Super light and comfy! And *less* pumpkin-like than most.

I also made some stupid shirts. I realized almost none of my summer shirts fit, so I've been making quite a few.

Playing around with an extended yoke on a sleeveless shirt, inspired by this McQ shirt


Except I had to make it cheesy, apparently. I'm no good at making minimal/clean looking clothing. I like stupid details too much. I would probably interface the yoke next time to make it a little cleaner. This fabric was also very wrinkly/hard to press which didn't help.


I have, since this picture, put buttons/buttonholes on this! And, uh, ironed the collar out. Found the fabric at the thrift store and decided to faux Givenchy/Versace it up. This was probably meant to be curtains or tablecloths originally.


This was originally a disco shirt that had some damage, but the fabric was too good to give up.

And I guess this is OK to post here? Maybe it would be better in the needlepoint thread since I didn't make the shorts. I wanted to test if you could cross-stitch on spandex:

You can--if you keep it stretched while you work and use waste canvas/water soluble canvas. I've got bigger, more terrible plans for this that are peculating until I get a serger.

Phew, sorry about the long post, I forget about this thread, then come back and get too excited to share everything I've been working on.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

I've been making some boring practical things, and also some really bananas things.

Boring and Practical:

New jean jacket since I left mine on a bus in South Philly. Dark denim with a little stretch, grey stitching, silver jean stud buttons. I really should have used a thicker top stitch thread. Sleeves are a little big to accommodate sweaters in the winter. I made the shirt underneath too, it's just a short sleeve chambray shirt, nothing special.



Flannel shirt and chambray shirt. I've got my shirt pattern right where I like it, and I can crank them out pretty fast. I chain pieced these at the same time and got them both done in a few days.


Corduroy bomber style jacket. My welt pockets are still a little wobbly, but I'm happy with the rest of it. Wish it wasn't so bright, but $3 thrift store fabric is what it is.

I also finally got to use this ice dyed fabric from a few years back as the lining! This was my second attempt at a lined jacket, and I think I got most of the bugs worked out.

Getting Stranger:

Inspired by some Zam Barett pants I saw, I decide to try and make a J-Leg pant pattern, and see what happened. It was a pretty easy alteration, but it took tons of fabric to make.

They have a neat drapey effect on them though. Next time I would taper the ankle of them a little more. I also had a real brain fart when putting together the fly area, so I can really only wear them with longer shirts.

What are You Doing, Why:

Just bought a new serger, decided to test drive it with Y-seams and a million 1" diamonds, that sounds reasonable, right? Testing out some ideas I had for making quilt patterned work out/athletic gear.

Sorry about the bum pic. I didn't finish these as the pattern I was using is clearly ill fitting, and the colors are pretty awful (just used whatever 4-way stretch I had on hand) but I'm happy to see it's possible, and have some plans for a finished product in the future.

The other thing you should definitely do to get used to your new serger/acclimate yourself to working with spandex is a complicated multi-layer applique. Yep.


It's super imperfect, but I sure learned a lot through the process. And I have a rad Halloween costume now so it all works out. The ripples and warping mostly go away when it's on, at least:

If want to read about my really trial and error method of spandex applique, I wrote it up a bit on my tumblr.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

Nicol Bolas posted:

Hey Goldaline when are you going to open up an etsy shop so I can buy those diamond-pattern shorts? Because WOW I need those. Everything you've made is loving gorgeous but those SHORTS! I want that pattern on leggings and a top and EVERYTHING.

Haha, well first I need to actually make a real finished pair! I'm still learning my way around stretch fabrics and my work is pretty wobbly/messy so I wouldn't feel comfortable selling anything yet. But I do really want to get into making weird sportswear. If anything happens on the etsy front I'll be sure to post here. Right now I'm still in the experimentation stage.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

If you remember last time I post I was sort of falling down a rabbit hole of serging and stretch fabric. Well, I think I've finally got my applique technique nailed down (stick and wash-away interfacing is the key!), so I tackled a biggish project.



I've been having fun interpreting really traditional textile patterns/techniques onto really athletic clothing. This one is based on Balitmore Album applique quilts from the mid to late 1800's. It was my first time really using the Stick and Washaway interfacing and holy crap does it make a difference. Also my first time really altering a stretch fabric pattern, it's so different than working with wovens. It had to be made in sections to allow the applique to be done flat.

Anyway if anyone's interested I wrote up a little tutorial on my technique (which is very, uh, not-proper due to machine limitations) I could post.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

NancyPants posted:

Goldaline, please tell me you're lifting in that.

Ahaha, no, I lift in ratty basketball shorts and a cut off t-shirt. I like to be able to just throw all my workout clothes in the wash and not care about them.

Amykinz posted:

I really want something like this for running. Not a full singlet, but some leggings or something. That is fantastic
Do it!!! I'm about to show you how so you have no excuses.

HELLO LADIES posted:

Literally every time you post I basically end up yelling "LET ME GIVE YOU MY MONEY!!!!" at the screen. Girl, you need to be charging hipsters in Brooklyn $500 a pop for that poo poo. I am not even making that poo poo up, p.sure if you opened a store there you'd have like an eBay reselling market in the thousands of dollars inside a month.

I don't really have the skill set or infrastructure to make things this way. Like, I wouldn't have any idea how to grade a pattern up or down. I just tinker with taking things apart and fussing with them, it's all very trial and error. I'm using a machine that's not really very good at what I'm doing (which is why you'll see I'm doing the applique in sort of a strange way) and I wouldn't be very comfortable selling things until I felt they were more professionally finished.

If I can get it all a little more polished, I am going to look into maybe doing some work for local wrestlers, some of them have some truly woeful tights/briefs. Working on commission one-on-one seems a little more doable?

Funhilde posted:

Yes a tutorial would be great

Ok! Here We Go!

I'll be clear that this is not the 'proper' way to do stretch applique. I'm doing all my stitching on the 'wrong' side of the piece, because if I work on the 'right' side, my machine will, without fail, start dragging and distorting the fabric. I've tried adjusting the pressure foot height, and I don't currently have a walking foot, so this is the best way I came up with. Despite not being the 'right' way, it does give pretty nice, clean results-better than other techniques I've seen shared-so I think it's ok to pass along. Other people may have similar machine issues and might find it helpful.

First of all, you will need

1) Spandex or other stretch material
2) Stick and Wash-Away Stabilizer (I used Pellon 542) The stabilizer really makes all the difference in the world and I can't recommend it enough. I was trying to use Tear-Away stabilizers (because they are much cheaper) but the results are not nearly as good. You end up with ripples in the work from pulling the stabilizer away.
3) Matching Thread to all your fabrics (the closer you can get, the better the results.)
4) A machine capable of Zig-Zag Stitch
5) A clear embroidery foot (I actually don't have this, but I am purchasing one immediately, and imagine it would make things even easier)
6)Temporary Fabric Spray Adhesive


Trace your pattern onto the interfacing. I marked where the colors are going to go, just as a guide. Don't use a washable crayola marker like me because I was washing the 'bleed' of it out of all the pieces later. Make sure you are drawing on the interfacing itself and not the paper backing. Also make sure you mirror the design if you need to.


Roughly cut out the interfacing, then peel of the backing and attach to your base fabric. Now that itís nice and firm with the interfacing, you can cut out the pattern piece more precisely, with none of the shifting that often happens with spandex. Iíve then gone ahead and used temporary spray adhesive to attach a layer of red to the right side of my work (you can see it sticking out in the armhole of the bottom piece. Because there is a lot of red, I just covered the whole piece. The excess will be cut away later.


You're now going to zig-zag on the 'wrong' side of the work, following the lines drawn on the interfacing. I personally have it set at a 2 width and just a hair less than 1 length. You don't want it so close it will effect the stretch, but too loose and won't look good or give you the control to follow your lines. I got pretty good at circles and curves on this one, and the biggest advice I can give is ĎPivot. A Lot.í Youíre going to have to put the needle down and pivot every couple of stitches on a circle or other tight curve. Donít try and just swing the stitching around as you go, it doesnít work well and drags the fabric around. Figuring out the 'sequence' of layers is important, I even made a whole trial piece to make sure I got it right. This may or may not apply to you depending on your design. Notice the long tails of string--rather than back stitching, which ends up getting a bit lumpy--I suggest leaving long tails, then using a hand needle to pull them all to the back and tie them off, then trim.


Okay, so I forgot to take a picture of me cutting away the extra fabric on the red layer, but as you can see here, Iíve added and stitched a green layer and am starting to cut it away. Just use sharp little embroidery scissors and gently tug the fabric, getting as close to the zig-zagged edge as you can. It takes a little practice, but Iíve gotten pretty good at getting nice clean edges this way. As you can see with the green fabric, if that colorís design is not all over the piece, you can attach smaller pieces of fabric, just making sure it covers the whole area where it is needed.


Hereís the back after all the green and red stitching is done. Now time for pink! As you can see, I attached the red centers to the pink flowers already. Itís easier to put them on first with the rest of the red, then cut out the pink center of the flower (like reverse applique) then to go back and do another layer of red. These were the sort of things I had to puzzle out when I was figuring out the 'sequence' of layers.


Here you can see the pink attached, itís used in small areas so I can get away with using small pieces to reduce waste. The extra fabric waste is really the biggest downside to this technique. That and truly tiny details might be difficult to trim away.

No pictures of this step, but once youíre all trimmed up, go ahead and rinse the work in cold water, and the interfacing will magically dissolve, leaving you with nice smooth applique.


This is all the pieces laid out after being washed out. Before I serged them all together though, there was one more step. You may or may not need to do this, depending on your design.


To reduce bulk (especially where it will be serged together) I cut away the cream base fabric where there was large open areas of the red. In smaller areas I would say itís not worth it. I did cut the center of the flower away too, just because I ended up with three layers of fabric there.

I hope this is all clear, I'm the worst at remembering to take pictures every step of the way.

I also realized as I was pulling pictures for this I wait way too long to post in here, I've made a lot of stuff since Halloween, haha. I won't clog things up too much but this goes along with theme, I also made a 'Cableknit' top/bottom set. This one I used the Tear-Away stabilizer for, and though it's not that obvious when it's on, it looks all rippled when it's laid flat.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

I've got a 1034d too! For the price, it works amazingly well. I had more problems with the higher end Babylocks I used at school than with this. The only complaint I might have is that I've yet to figure out tension settings to get an okay looking flatlock seam.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

Oh boy, you know what was the worst part of that last project? Doing the itty-bitty circles in the center of the flowers.

Wow, what a pain.

Sure glad that's over with and I never have to do that aga--



Oh...ok. :sweatdrop:

E: Also I'm having problems now that it's hot out that the sweat from my hands will start to dissolve the interfacing and make it stick to the presserfoot.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

Bitter Beard posted:

Curious why don't you invest in an embroidery machine and then do partials to get the same effect? Just looking at that design I can see the perfect place to break it apart and the the most you would need to do the way you are now would be the outer boarder all the way around so it is continuous.

1: Poor/cheap, it took me more than a year to justify buying my 1034

2: I'm really stubborn and weird about doing things 'by hand.' Using a machine at all for an 'art piece' (as opposed to just normal clothing to wear everyday) is only happening because I'm using stretch materials. Way back when in college I was doing poo poo like this with just a needle and thread. This feels too easy in comparison, hahaha. I'm going to blame it on going to school for "Crafts" which puts a lot of emphasis on handmade vs production work. But in reality I think I like little fiddly handwork regardless.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

Oh, good find! I do go through needles crazy fast, and it's really hard for me to find them locally. Hopefully some ballpoints or universals go up sometime soon.

And for all my complaining about the little circles, I gotta say it was worth it:



:dance:

It was my first time using mesh, layering it was tricky but I really like the result! Playing with shaped edges too. This is the leg/side/back area of one side. Now to flip it and do the other side (ugh) and the big front medallion (UGH)

I've got a fake "crochet granny square" idea using the mesh too that I'm playing around with right now.


This sample is using cream spandex as the background...but with a sheer background might be even better. That's the original lace sample I was messing with too.

Goldaline fucked around with this message at 16:21 on Jun 26, 2015

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

Happiness Commando posted:

I want to get a sewing machine so that I can make my own pants. I dont know anyone to help me search for a decent used machine - is there a basic sewing machine that I can buy new as a no-skills beginner that is affordable and will do what I need? (what do I need?)

My tactic was to trawl ebay and craigslist, looking for decent looking deals, then look up reviews of the machines on Pattern Review You have to sign up, but I found it a useful site all around. There's even pattern reviews for pants!

As for what you need, well, if you just want to make pants you really just need something with a straight stitch that can handle heavier weight fabrics. Generally I'd shoot for an older, solid metal machine in good shape. Ones without lots of do-hickey stitches are often cheaper too. I have a 1960's Bernina that I like a lot, and used 1980's models in school that were also great. Older Singer/Pfaff/Brother/Janome are probably all good things to look at.


Arsenic Lupin posted:

edit edit: Has anybody in the thread ever used Japanese hand needles? https://www.massdrop.com/buy/tulip-needle-6-piece-gift-set I usually use either John James or Piecemakers.
I almost want these just because the packaging is so cute. I have tulip beading needles but that's the extent of my experience with them.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

I am sorry for posting so much, but I finished the front piece, and I'm just so pleased. I had a major difficultly with my spray adhesive failing about halfway through, and nearly scrapped it. But, working slowly and really holding everything flat as I went, I managed to get through. Next time, I won't work with such a large piece all at once. Breaking this into two pattern pieces would have been much easier.



A question for you all: I've used silicon backed elastic before for the bottom edges of shorts, to keep them from riding up/shifting. Since the bottom of the shorts on these are shaped, obviously that's not an option. Do you think I could just buy some silicone in a tube (like for aquarium or kitchen sealant use) and put a small bead of it on the bottom scalloped edge? It's a couple layers (mesh/blue spandex/white spandex) so I don't think it will bleed through...

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

Eponine posted:

I imagine puff paint would work in a similar way, except it has a more precision tip, it probably would not bleed through as much, plus you could match the color to your project.

Ahh! I never thought of that, it could be a nice cheap solution too. I'll pick up a tube and try it on my little sample piece.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

Invisible Ted posted:

I'd just like to know if anyone has any particular tips regarding sewing aprons, specifically for a professional kitchen.

On anything with patch pockets like this, I like to use a kiddie glue stick to hold the seam allowance in place after pressing. I find it gives a cleaner edge. Also rather than trying to stick a knitting needle into the channel, I'll usually get a big embroidery needle, thread it with some yarn, drop it through the channel, then tie the end to the twill tape and yank it through.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

theflyingexecutive posted:

If I've sewn fur with a white backing to a coat collar, what's the best way to color the edges of the backing black to match the coat?

Probably Sharpie? If it's a small area I'd go with Sharpie. If it's large, maybe consider sewing some sort of trim over the edge?

I finished my lace singlet! If you want to read a lot of artist-statementy words about why I'm making this weird stuff, check out my rambly tumblr post about it, I'm not putting you all through that here.



I will say I learned a valuable lesson from this one to not make the pieces so big. What a disaster that central medallion/straps piece was. I think I might test out my mask making skills and make a matching mask for this one. I'm assuming that 'spacer' material sold on a lot of spandex websites is probably what I'm looking for as a base?

I'm also stuck between granny square crochet and marquetry--they make wood print spandex!--for my next project. What to do? Now I'm taking a break and just making myself some quick t-shirts.

Oh and I also took my first pro-wrestling class and really enjoyed it, so maybe I'll have some reason to wear these dumb things in the future, hahaha.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

Funhilde posted:

This is just unbelievably cool. I wish I had the time/patience to do something like that or clients willing to pay me for that kind of work.

edit: I hope you don't mind but I shared this on my business FB page because I like sharing other cool stuff on there.

Of course, thank you! Your website is lovely by the way. I should really work on that so I can stop linking people to the tumblr where I post all sorts of dumb things.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

cloudy posted:

Does anyone have any experience with recurrent neck/upper back pain due to sewing for long periods of time?
Sewing is my full time job (luckily I get days where I don't have to sew and I get to stand or work on a computer instead) -- but when I have a big project and have to sew full time for a week sometimes I get really bad neck pain that doesn't go away for awhile. (I've been treating it with sports therapy type procedures so far: icing, rolling it, massages, etc)

Of course I am assuming it's the posture (often times I really crane my neck down to get my face right in there to do precision stuff) but I'm wondering if anyone has dealt with this and what their experience was?

Hopefully this is.. appropriate for this thread. Really just wanna know if people who do the same thing as me have the same issue, or if it's just me (caused by an entire life of being a hunched over nerd).

Oh yeah, I have to work really hard not to have neck/shoulder/back issues. The combination of my weightlifting and textile hobbies are sometimes at odds with each other--my right pec/front shoulder muscles are super tight from years of pulling needle-and-thread and knitting motions and I had to do a lot of mobility work to fix it. It was messing with my overhead and bench press pretty badly.

I do mostly the same as you, plus lots of stretching. Look up mobility work outs/stretches for your specific trouble areas, and really stick to doing them every day. Get up and take lots of little breaks to move around and loosen up when you're working for long periods of time. Yoga is great too if you have the time. DDP Yoga, as goofy as it is, is a great back stretch/strengthener.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

cloudy posted:

Oooooo I was going to ask about yoga, I'm glad you brought it up! Thanks for your response. Sounds like I really should be stretching every day, time to really try to get in to a new routine.

I actually had to stop weightlifting because I kept hurting my neck doing overhead press (surprise-- probably cause it was so tight from my sewing posture) so this all makes a lot of sense.

Hmm sounds like we may have had similar issues. Definitely try a doorway stretch after swinging your arms a bit to warm them up. That has been the most helpful stretch, personally.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

I'm not totally understanding--do you want to replace the lining with the giraffe print, or layer it over top on the outside? Also does it fasten with zips or buttons up the front? When working on already-sewn-up clothing, you often end up either needing to seam rip it apart, or hand sew. It's hard to maneuver a sewing machine around a sewn up garment. It's why you add pockets/details before you get things put together when you're making from scratch.

edit to add: satin is pretty much the devil in terms of shifting around while being sewn, and putting it on top of nylon sounds really un-fun.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

theflyingexecutive posted:

If I do seam rip it all up, would I be able to put it back together with just the machine I have on hand? And yes I want to layer the satin over the nylon. Also, I don't mind accidentally destroying the jacket. It was three bucks and I have a ton of the satin.

In theory, yes, in practice, maybe?? If you nick it while seam ripping it, as I always do, it's pretty much over.

If I had to try this I'd probably:

-Rip the sleeves off
-Rip up the side seam so I could lay the piece flat.
-Use tracing paper to trace out the back and two fronts, then cut out of satin, adding seam allowances.
-Stitch the shoulder seams on your new pieces
-Attach them at center front (this may take some finagling if there's a zip or something.) and I guess around the neck? Is there a collar?
-Sew up the side seams with all four layers held together
-Pop the sleeves back on.
-Hem the bottom

But really, I'd probably just trace out the jacket pieces and make a new one out of satin at that point. It's definitely going to look sort of messy putting it over top. Which is okay if you're going for sort of a punk aesthetic I suppose.

I'm big into finding thrift store items with interesting patterns or good fits and tearing them apart to make my own.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

Amykinz posted:

I followd your tumblr and I noticed you do knitting too. You know we have a knitting thread?

Wooo, what's your username? I have the knitting thread bookmarked, and I do read it, I don't know why I never post. I don't knit very interesting things I suppose.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

Black is also notoriously hard to dye on plant fibers. You usually end up with weird green/gray/purple colors. The general rule is to start with a dark fabric/fiber and over dye. But yeah, most fabric dyes are toxic to some degree during use, after its bonded to the fibers not so much, as long as you rinse well.

Buying black jute isn't an option?

Also, Amykinz, I should have known with a great name like that you were a goon friend. Most of my recent followers are strange tumblr 16 year old cosplay/bjd fans and they make me feel old.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

I watch too much pro wrestling, I immediately thought of Tyler Breeze:



I'm stepping away from the spandex (because I need to not drop $100 on stretchy fabrics right now) and working on a quilted sweatshirt for myself. Usually I'm not really into 'nerdy' clothing, but I didn't want to use a real magical circle or make one up. And I always thought the Clow Reed circle was pretty.



Hand quilting it through tracing paper, about 3/4 through now.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

I feel like I post too much, but I finished up my Magical Circle sweatshirt!









As always, lots of words about it on my tumblr if you want to check it out! I'm super pleased with it, it's comfortable, warm, and within my comfort zone so I'll actually wear it. I love making strange things (clearly) but I'm a pretty simple dresser in day to day life, sometimes it's hard to figure out the compromise there.

I'm not promising anything, but I am in the research kind of phase about maybe selling some of my spandex stuff. As far as I can tell, there's plenty of people selling plain (usually in really shiny wild fabric) leggings/shorts/bras/whatever, but very few doing applique, and most of those are cosplay oriented. I'm starting to tackle pattern grading, and thinking about simplified designs that might actually be affordable

So we'll see!

Would love to see what everyone's working on at the moment--if only so I don't bogart the thread...

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

Hemlock posted:

Have you ever thought about putting together a book? I have (normally) no interest in wrestling/athletics gear and only a casual observer's relationship with sewing but I would absolutely buy a book of your work/projects and I imagine a lot of other people would too. Would be stunning if it was just beautiful and detailed photography but if you included tutorials I imagine that'd be a big draw for crafters/makers.

Ready for Christmas 2016 please!

Haha, well, I don't know about a book, but I really do need to at least get better photos taken if I ever want to go anywhere with these. Right now I'm on hiatus from big projects because I just don't have the money. The parquet themed one I want to do next totals up to over $100 in supplies, ugh. I've been making knock off Hunter Welly Socks for some extra cash right now, but that's not exciting!

Oh, but I did let myself buy $10 of black denim recently, that turned into:


I didnít make us matching jean jacket/vests on purpose, but I just had so much fabric left over after making my boyfriend's vest, and I needed a black jacket. Can you tell from the picture we are 1í and 100Lb apart?




My jacket was based off an old jean jacket I bought at a thrift store. It was an unusual design, with patch chest pockets, and no welt hand pockets or front seams. So this time, I added those design elements, basing them on the ones from my boyfriend's jacket (from which I patterned his vest)


It was my first time doing a warm lining like this. It came out nice and clean, but I wish I had added a little more ease, itís a bit snug over a sweater. In the body, itís a thrifted sweatshirt fleece, backed with batting. The sleeves are (also thrifted) silk quilted to the batting.

Not the most exciting project either, I guess, but we're both happy. :)







'

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

It's damask, I think? It's a weaving technique where the pattern is done in satin weave, if I remember right.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

Asstro Van posted:

Anyone make their own swimsuits?

I have an irrational compulsion to have a one piece, but I have a freakishly long torso and I'm just not digging the long-torsoed options out there. It would be magical to have one that was actually comfortable and didn't feel like it was trying to slice me in half right up the middle. I've got a decent machine, but I haven't sewn spandex or really any stretch before. Tips and such much appreciated.

Totally unrelated pictures, but here is this thing I did! Apologies if I've bragged about it before, I can't remember the last time I posted and am too lazy to check. Basically the laziest excuse for a quilt ever, but I love it anyway. It's supposed to be like a tree with a heart carved in it, the back is a ridiculous awesome floral bonanza.

That quilt looks mega cozy!

I've made swim bottoms for myself, pus a the weird spandexy singlet things you can see earlier in this thread. A serger really helps if you can get access to one, but you can do it with a regular machine too. See if it has a stretch stitch, but if not, zigzag will work ok too. Make sure you set the presserfoot to the lightest pressure or it'll drag the layers around. Don't try to cut multiple layers of spandex at once, it slides and curls like a mother. wawak.com is the cheapest place I've found for notions like swim elastic. spandexhouse.com is my favorite/cheapest for fabric, I know the site is janky-their cart system doesn't even take your payment info, they call you to get it-but I've never had any problems.

I think Jalie makes lots of sewing patterns for swimwear. But I'll always recommend just taking an old suit apart and altering as you need.

Found the swim bottoms-I think I actually used a boxer brief tracing for them? I didn't make the rash guards though.


I haven't been posting here lately because I've been distracted with drawing and knitting. But I'm sure I'll swing back to sewing at some point. Sonetimes you have to change up your focus.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

Personally, I sort of hate making pants, mostly because I hate putting zippers in. And I wear through the knees of my pants so fast it's just not worth the time/effort. It would be a tough first project just because there's a lot of skills to master to do it right (fly zippers, welt pockets, inserting a waistband, maybe flat felled seams, ect.)
Definitely possible, but I would practice those things before making the pants so you're comfortable with them..

But, I do really like going to the thrift store and buying out of fashion dress pants (they're always in the $1 room, and often nearly new!) and altering them. Turning wide legged ones to cropped, tapered fits, or way-too-big ones to drapey crotchy fits. It's cheap enough that you don't feel bad experimenting, and taking things apart will give you a better idea of how things are made. It might be a good step between 'hemming' and 'making from whole cloth)

Patternwise, I use something really similar to the 'rub off' method. You'll need to do some cleaning up and I'd definitely always make a mock up pair first, but I think you'll get something much more like rtw pants that way. Commercial pattern pants always look sort of off to me.

Shamefully I've done almost no sewing lately, been too busy drawing. But I'm working on a tote bag right now! How exciting!

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

there wolf posted:

Is it possible to work with chiffon without a serger? I'm making a cape and I just need a way to keep the cut edges from fraying too badly, and to attach cuff and a collar essentially.

Adding to Funhilde's good advice, if you have a throat plate for your machine with a smaller hole, that'll help the chiffon from getting sucked down into it. A little starch might also help keep it lined up. I like basting my seams rather than pinning on that sort of fabric too.

I posted this in the cosplay thread already, but I guess I can share it here too - I've been binge reading JoJo's Bizarre Adventure recently, and I love all the ridiculous costumes in it. They were clearly drawn with no thought to how they'd look or work in real life, so it's sort of a fun challenge to try and translate that into actual clothing. I think too often cosplay goes with fabric choices that you just wouldn't use in real clothing, which can make things look sort of cheap and fake. If your material has a real life integrity, no matter how crazy the outfit, it's more "believable" (Oh no, now I'm using my college thesis material to justify making a dumb costume. Pull up! Pull up!)


I made Mista Guido's outfit because it's super obnoxious and making that hat seemed like a fun project. Plus I am a stinky, hairy Italian, so I'm playing to type. Don't know if I'll wear it anywhere, just wanted to figure it out. I might make more, choosing one is tough because there's just so many dumb weird outfits.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

There's nothing worse than wanting to sew and not being physically able too! I had to take a lot of breaks on this project because my hand kept clawing up from all the cutwork.

I can't stop making Jojo costumes, the designs are just so stupid and always present some new challenge to overcome. This time around I decide to make this waffleshirt:



You could go about it a bunch of ways...I've seen people use strips or tubes of fabric, or just cut holes on a jersey knit shirt.
But there's no seams criss-crossing it, and there seems to be a backing of some kind, since we don't seem through it when it bunches up. So I settled on a cutaway applique of sweatshirt fleece on a mesh backing.


It took a couple tries to get the grid looking right in the arm holes and sleeves. And just looking at the pattern was giving me the cold sweats, imagining lining up all those little squares at each seam.


So then a whole lot of this happened. And I pull through every darn thread end, tie it off and tuck it under the stitching. It wasn't tedious at all! I listened to a lot of podcasts!


And then a whollllle lot of this. With tiny scissors. Which gave me claw hand, so I had to really space out doing each piece. I made a .gif of it to help me not lose my marbles at this point.



Was it worth it?


Awww yeah it was. Nothing better than the feeling of sick satisfaction when something this dumb and complicated comes together.


Now I get to do JoJo poses in it!! I made Kira's sailor suit too, but it was much less complex. Just had to draft an open, shallow sailor collar, and make pants with weird sticky-out pockets.

I did post these in the cosplay thread, so I hope it's OK to cross post, they do seem more into the prop/armor side of things there, and I thought the sewing process on this was sort of interesting.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

Crocobile posted:

I've been seeing your posts in this thread and the cosplay thread and I'm continually blown away by your skill and patience! And I completely support your addiction to making JoJo costumes. There's SO MANY and it's cool seeing someone with lots of sewing experience and know-how try to tackle Araki's designs; as ludicrous as they are he seems to be inspired by real fashion... I'll try to take pics this weekend?

There's TOO MANY. It's hard to pick! I want to either make Fugo's swiss cheese suit (which looks like a pattern making nightmare) or Yotsuyu Yamiyagi's outfit (I'm already playing around with ideas to make spiked tights)

He's totally influenced by real high fashion. I think I found the original inspiration for the waffleshirt, it was a Gucci sweater, and it was knit as an open grid. But then, that's not really what it looked like when it was drawn so...it's a physical interpretation of a drawn interpretation of an original garment?

Also yes! Take pictures! Post 'em up.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

I wonder if it's not a needle problem, but the presser foot sticking to the screen print? If changing needles doesn't work, try putting a piece of tracing/tissue paper on top of the patch and sew through that?

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

Tactical Grace posted:

Hi thread, I want to make some fabric prints from manhole covers etc. in the style of http://www.raubdruckerin.de/ and was hoping someone could offer me a little advice as to what the best sort of ink to use would be and in general. I've never done block printing before but it looks pretty self explanatory. Any good resources or tips?

Thanks!

You could use screen printing ink like Versatex or I think Jacquard makes one too. Quick and dirty option would be acrylic mixed with fabric medium, if you didn't need it to be washed a lot.

A moment to toot my own horn...I'm Makezine's Maker Spotlighttoday! Go read me struggle to explain why I make all this dumb poo poo.

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Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

Testing, testing, 1, 2, 3....


I got an idea to make a really clean looking spike bay making a cone with a circle "base" that extends outward a little bit, then poking it, unstuffed up through a hole in the main fabric. Then a tight zig zag around the edge of the hole, and cutting a tiny slit in the back of the 'base' to stuff it through. It sounds crazy, but:


It worked!



Which is great, because this:

Is my next big project. Can't wait to make a million of them!!

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