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BonerGhost
Mar 9, 2007



I've never made a quilt before. I'm a beginner at sewing and I think a quilt would be a good way to get really familiar with the machine and sewing basics.

I want to make this and I can't for the life of me figure out how to piece these blocks. Does anyone have a pattern or tips? It was posted several pages ago and I can't remember by whom since I just saved the picture.

e: Is anyone using or has used a Brother LS-2125i? I'm having a hell of a time with upper and lower thread tension. After rewinding bobbins and fiddling with upper tension to no end, I finally started messing with the bobbin tension and can't remember where it was set at the factory. Any tips?

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BonerGhost fucked around with this message at 00:11 on May 31, 2012

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BonerGhost
Mar 9, 2007



Reverend Cheddar posted:

Think of it as made up of 3x3 blocks. Sew together two 1x1 pieces. Then sew a 1x2 perpendicular to the first seam. Then sew another 1x2 parallel to the first seam. Last, finish it off with a 1x3 strip.
When piecing a quilt, look at the seams, not the shapes :)

I approached it that way, but I'm stuck because that means I can't line up the edges of my 1x1 piece blocks with the 1x2, I have to sew it centered with the seam allowance of the 1x2 hanging off unless I'm not accounting correctly for seam allowances. I gave myself 1/4" seam allowances all around without accounting for placement of the blocks, so for my 1x1" pieces I cut 1.5" pieces and so on.

BonerGhost
Mar 9, 2007



Thanks Reverend Cheddar and Handbags at Dawn for chiming in on that bento box quilt. My initial problem was that for the longest blocks, I wasn't giving 1/4" seam, I was using 1/2" and didn't realize it. I've since figured it out, but I don't have my camera handy to show pictures of test blocks I made with scraps. They're pretty, though. It never occurred to me to make them as large blocks and cut them into quarters. I might do that when I get the fabric I actually want to make the quilt from. How do people approach the plain fabric on the backside? For say a full or queen-sized quilt, it doesn't seem like you can get fabric that wide. Do you just piece large pieces as necessary?

Silver Alicorn, that is exactly how the bobbin is set up. I did a lot of fiddling before finally messing with the screw because the manual also says not to do it unless you have to. The problem I'm having now is that with the upper and lower tension approximately right, the bobbin thread is jerking all over the place. The top has very even, straight stitches, but on the bottom it's nearly zigzagged. Someone else was having a similar problem a few pages back, I think. I can't remember how long ago it was and I'm having trouble finding it.

BonerGhost
Mar 9, 2007



You're an evil genius. I'm sure I'd have come up with using a sheet in a couple days, then posted in here to see if I invented it.

So today when I got home, my maintenance man greeted me with a request to take in some pants for him cause he used to be really fat and now he's comically skinny.

Here is what he gave me to get it done:



BTW it does say it was manufactured in Western Germany. I need to find a way to replace the hinges on the cabinet. One is broken and twisted, and the back one doesn't seem to be traveling in the correct direction because I can't get the machine properly seated in the cabinet. I hand cranked it and the motion is very smooth.

Is this thing as awesome as it looks?

e: holy table breaking batman

e2: oh yeah it's a 189A. Still doing research.

BonerGhost fucked around with this message at 00:22 on Jun 5, 2012

BonerGhost
Mar 9, 2007



I love the idea of flannel boardshorts. It sounds like a tube of clotrimazole waiting to happen. I hope they were plaid.

BonerGhost
Mar 9, 2007



Oracle posted:

Oh god its Halloween and my six year old wants to be a shaolin monk. I got the generic McCall's 6184 karate gi pattern but I'd like to add a gusset to the pants for better kicking and alter the shirt so its more accurate (the shaolin shirts look longer to me and are a kind of wrap shirt with and inside and outside tie, see here and here, where you can sorta see the outside tie hanging down). It seems like they're as asymmetrical as well, with the overwrap part coming to more of a point at the point its tied.

Suggestions?

Wish I had my old tkd gi to take a pic and show you. The shirt is definitely a wrap shirt with ties like you said. That second pic makes it look weird because of the pose, but the bottom of the shirt flaps hang horizontally.

BonerGhost
Mar 9, 2007



Perhaps using a walking foot?

BonerGhost
Mar 9, 2007



Any tips for avoiding lettuce edge? I'm sure a lot of it just takes practice, but a little guidance is helpful.

BonerGhost
Mar 9, 2007



Thanks for those links! Very useful!

BonerGhost
Mar 9, 2007



Phishi posted:

Alright sewing thread, I've been browsing through and slowly been filling up with sewing envy. Add into that I'm a weird body shape and finding clothes is a nightmare... Well, I figure if I can knit lace I can sew a dress or even jeans! I've been looking around on Craigslist for machines, and found this little beauty: http://seattle.craigslist.org/see/art/3715292254.html. Provided it *works* it seems to be a pretty decent price. Many go for less (and I will probably try to haggle), but I'm finding a few on E-Bay for even more. I just wanted to make sure this would do what I need it to do... Basically making shirts, dresses, maybe even jeans! I'm also intrigued by quilting, though I don't have the time or space for that hobby at the moment.

It seems to be quite the trooper of a machine, and the thought of wearing things that fit and are pretty is very exciting!

Assume that any machine you buy will need at least a tuneup service and factor that into your purchase cost when considering how much you want to spend. You will also need to find or buy a manual which can run you a few bucks, unless you have someone in your life gifted with sewing machines.

The advice to get a machine as cheap as possible is good advice; you don't need a machine that will last you forever until you find a machine you want to keep for forever. They're easily replaceable.

T-shirts are a bitch to make because knits are a bitch when you're first learning. A straight stitch machine is not recommended for that. Straight stitch machines are workhorses, don't get me wrong, but if you want to make clothing you may need something that can zigzag.

BonerGhost
Mar 9, 2007



meche posted:

I have bags of jeans also! I'm itching to turn them into a quilt. I have the denim needle ready and all.

Have been working on the below instead though:





So many quilts, so little time.

Is the pink and orange one single? I want to marry it.

BonerGhost
Mar 9, 2007



I know if you don't actually quilt it (or hand tie it) then it isn't really a quilt, but is it insane to make a quilt and then just not quilt it? Don't you usually quilt after the top and bottom have been assembled together anyway?

BonerGhost
Mar 9, 2007



Oh my word what a dress. Love that silhouette.

BonerGhost
Mar 9, 2007



Man, I ain't know about the rest of you, but a steady supply of SHARP seam rippers, one of those handy magnetic seam guides, bunches of pins and a couple different pincushions, and several magnets for organizing machine needles have been really useful to me. Depending on what she sews, maybe a really nice steam iron, a cutting table/mat/rotary cutter (and spare blades!), and a good pair of scissors? I'm also a big fan of bobbin and thread spool cases. I work best when my poo poo is organized.

BonerGhost
Mar 9, 2007



I have a Brother LS2125i and I HATE the thing. I can never get the drat tension set right and it really can't handle denim. If you're going to get a cheap machine like that, find one on craigslist. Don't pay full price for a brand new one unless you're buying it from a shop.

BonerGhost
Mar 9, 2007



sithwitch13 posted:

I found a couple of easy Simplicity patterns on sale and decided to get bold. Today I tried my hand at a cardigan:



It took me five hours, several instances of having to rip the seams and start over (including one sleeve sewed on inside-out) but I feel very slightly better about my ability to read and follow a pattern now. Plus it's comfy as hell, I used a nice medium-weight jersey fabric I found on sale yesterday.

Do you have a serger or do you use a regular machine? I have a hell of a time with anything stretch on my machine, but that is probably because it is a piece of poo poo and can't maintain tension to save its stupid, plastic life.

Anyone have a good resource for altering jackets? I really don't want to buy a new winter coat right now as I have several pea coats that are too big and I'm still dropping weight. I can figure out the side seams just fine, but I really don't know what I'm doing in the shoulders. I know that's the most difficult area to alter and I'm basically going to be sewing a new jacket by this point, but I guess it's time to learn anyway. Even a good pattern that I can get online without having to wait for it to be shipped would be nice.

BonerGhost
Mar 9, 2007



schnarf posted:

I'm getting into sewing, and just finished my first two real projects. Most recently I did a Colette Cooper bag:




Before that, I did a tote bag for my girlfriend:



I made a ton of mistakes and learned a lot, especially about laying out patterns -- I didn't mean for all those bikes to be upside down!

What up mang, those are some bangin lookin bags. Not bad at all, especially for a first project. Pretty sure my first project was a pincushion.

BonerGhost
Mar 9, 2007



I don't think coveralls would be a good solution because there is still the goal of needing to get out of it quickly.

I agree with the others, though. The only way you're going to find someone to do this is if they themselves are in love with the idea. I was thinking about it this morning after reading the post, and the only POSSIBLE way I'd take up anyone on this offer is if they bought ALL the materials up front. And I'm far from a pro.

BonerGhost
Mar 9, 2007



I was going to suggest spray starch. Might that make the pieces stick to each other enough to keep them sliding around?

BonerGhost
Mar 9, 2007



Why can't I cut fabric straight when I fold it? Every loving time I think I have everything at right angles, I double check it, and then cut it and it's all hosed up. Is it just a practice thing or am I doing something wrong and stupid?

BonerGhost
Mar 9, 2007



Fuuuuuuuu

E: make blue jeans! Make everything!

BonerGhost
Mar 9, 2007



Ok, will a serger let me sew knits and stretch fabrics without the nasty lettuce edge, or do I still have to bring some actual skill to the table? I can't obtain/maintain proper tension on my machine and no matter what I do, I can't get it right with knits and stretchy stuff.

Why don't people use the serger all the time? Is it just too much a pain in the rear end to thread, or is it just not suited to wovens or something?

BonerGhost
Mar 9, 2007



flutterbyblue posted:

I had that issue with my machine, especially on thicker parts of fabric. Top would be fine, bottom would be this loose thready mess--nothing seemed to fix it when I fiddled with the tension. For me, it turned out I had my bobbin threaded into the machine wrong (it appears that when the needle grabbed the bobbin thread, the lack of tension on the bobbin made it pull big loops instead of neat little stitches though it compensated pretty well when the fabric was thin or only a double layer), so that might be something worth checking if you're still having issues.

When you say threaded in wrong, do you mean like backwards inside the bobbin case, bobbin case not seated right, or something else?

I have this exact same problem and I'm 100% certain the bobbin is oriented correctly within the case (unless the manual is wrong), the case is seated correctly in the shuttle, and there's only one way to pull the bobbin thread up on my machine since it's a regular front-loader.

All I could figure was I needed to buy a chicken and a sharp knife if I wanted to hit upon the arcane combination of tension to make this stop.

BonerGhost
Mar 9, 2007



Flutter, thanks for weighing in on it. My machine is different than yours, but I have some ideas now.

Goldaline, please tell me you're lifting in that.

BonerGhost
Mar 9, 2007



Tee shirts are surprisingly difficult to sew and are really not a beginner project. Don't be discouraged from sewing if it seems ridiculously hard.

BonerGhost
Mar 9, 2007



I have such a hard time with tension. It's like witchcraft; the tiniest nudge on either top or bobbin throws everything off for miles, twisting the drat thing all the way around does nothing. I can't correlate the results with the action here, it's like that loving knob is set to random. All I can think of is that I don't have it threaded right, but the manual has piece of poo poo drawings. It probably makes sense for everyone else except me because I have a ~*special brain*~

E: brother LS-2125i. The biggest thing that makes me think I'm doing something wrong is how tension/stitch length change on the same piece of scrap fabric. Like, in the same line.

BonerGhost fucked around with this message at 05:04 on Sep 27, 2015

BonerGhost
Mar 9, 2007



Oh, I bought this thing used years ago when I started sewing, didn't want to spend a ton of money on a machine when I had no idea how to buy one or what to look for, but this crap has plagued me since the beginning.

I have an old Adler in storage that needs service. I think I might just sell my x box and buy a Singer.

E: drat you weren't playing about that discount. Bought it!

I've never had a new machine before. I'm excited!

BonerGhost fucked around with this message at 15:01 on Sep 27, 2015

BonerGhost
Mar 9, 2007



What is it about a serger that makes it handle knits better? Is it the multiple threads?

BonerGhost
Mar 9, 2007



Comrade Quack posted:

I can't figure out a way to make the resulting shape not weird. You'd have to chop out part of the design or find some way to fill in the missing areas, and I think it would look weird.

I was thinking pillow too. You could sew up the arm holes and make it shirt-shaped, or cut them off and make a rectangle. You can add a piece of fabric inside the neck to sew it up.

BonerGhost
Mar 9, 2007



Aquatic Giraffe posted:

I bought a sewing machine this week and just spent the last couple hours fixing all my pants since my iron-on hems have all failed.

I have eternal troubles finding pants that fit off the rack since all pants seem to be designed for Amazonian women (I am 5'7 and still cannot buy a pair of pants off the rack that I don't need to hem, but then the short inseam is way too short) so I was kicking around the idea of trying to sew my own pants. How difficult are pants to sew? I'm looking at a standard pair of women's dress pants which don't seem too difficult on the surface.

Pants are not impossible to sew especially with practice but if you're looking at blue jeans, sewing them is going to be prohibitive from both cost and time perspectives since your machine more than likely will have a hard time with denim and raw materials may cost more than finished clothes. If you're looking for the sweet spot wrt time and money, buying pants long and hemming them would definitely be it.

That said, when you can sew, the thrift shop can be awesome.

BonerGhost
Mar 9, 2007



Aquatic Giraffe posted:

Definitely not jeans, looking more at dress pants for work. I looked at the Burda website and all their pants options for beginners are butt ugly.

I kinda want to make my own pants so I can finally have a pair of pants with adequate pockets. Although I guess I could find an existing pair of pants and just put in bigger pockets.

I don't think I've ever seen anything on Burda that I really liked and I don't have a good source for patterns that don't look like butt so I hope someone can chime in on that. Check out "rub off method" on Google, it's a way to make a pattern from an existing garment without deconstructing it. I haven't gotten the hang of it yet so I can't direct you too well on what's a good resource for it.

It's a waste of time, effort, and money to make clothes just to copy a lot of what's already out there. It is loads easier to say, hem pants or modify pockets on an existing garment than it is to make one from scratch, it's debatable whether it's easier to tailor a garment than make it from scratch and cost-wise, it's probably a wash. Garment manufacturers have economies of scale for materials that you won't have and they're paying third-world wages, so unless your time is worthless, you're not going to beat them on price. Your Hancock's and Jo-Anns have poo poo for garment fabric; those quilt cottons might be $3 a yard all the time but you're paying ~$20 a yard for questionable quality Lycra and ~$12-15 for so-so to bad suiting.

THAT SAID, sewing or modifying your own clothes is cool if you do it for the right reason and not expecting to save money (and if you have a good place to get fabric). If you're really hard-to-fit, you've got a particular style that you can't find in stores or is really prohibitively expensive, or you want something that's made better than by an overworked 7 year old who is paid by the piece, that's when it makes a lot of sense.

I'm hoping Goldaline has something to say, because those are some rad designs.

BonerGhost
Mar 9, 2007



Ain't gonna hate on no hello kitty sewing machine.

Sorry about your dad. There's no good timing for someone to die and it sounds like your circumstances were especially tough. I know it's easier said than done, but make sure you take care of yourself too. Be strong, goon.

BonerGhost
Mar 9, 2007



HodjasBitch posted:

All done!



Now I want to keep it.

Aaaaa so pretty

BonerGhost
Mar 9, 2007



Liquidation sales always suck. If you wait long enough to try to get 50% off, you'll be looking at fixtures.

BonerGhost
Mar 9, 2007



The purple is pretty from a distance, but the fun aspect is def understood. What are you making next?

BonerGhost
Mar 9, 2007



HodjasBitch posted:

I was going to tackle my pile of UFOs, but that would make too much sense. I'm about 30 hours into a 2,600+ piece rolling waves quilt in blue and green. It'll finish at about 80" square. In a few days, I'll be cursing my maker for not providing me with a mid or long arm quilting machine.

I have yet to begin my first quilt for this reason, but there's a quilting place within about 20 min of me that I think will do it or will maybe let me do it? The idea of someone else quilting my quilt really bothers me.

BonerGhost
Mar 9, 2007



Mmmm drat let me get that on my bed and have my husband be like ugh I don't like colooooooors and then I'm like suck it.

No input on what you should do next. It's beautiful, I want to marry it.

BonerGhost
Mar 9, 2007



Oh my gaaaaawd

BonerGhost
Mar 9, 2007



How big of a quilt could I reasonably make with a Moda jelly roll?

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BonerGhost
Mar 9, 2007



Yeah don't do that. It's a great way to get long term tissue damage and usually doesn't seal the cut well enough to be of use, and then you can't get stitches because too much time has elapsed/you have too much crap in it. I have seen too many injuries made worse by super glue; if you think you need stitches, you have max 4 hours to make it happen.

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