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Marius Pontmercy
Apr 2, 2007

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Fart Jesus LOL posted:

bag bag bag bag

How did you do the bottom? My mom and I have been experimenting with grocery bags lately trying to make them lie flatter but hold more and I think squaring the bottom has worked the best. I LOVE the lining. I love the whole bag, really.

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Marius Pontmercy
Apr 2, 2007

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Goldaline, will you marry me? I'll handquilt whatever you want.

Marius Pontmercy
Apr 2, 2007

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Not an Anthem posted:

Wow, meche, beautiful!

Question about POWAH.. my bernina is fine for most tailoring jobs on a pair of jeans except when I'm doing cuffs and hit the area where its a seam double onto itself so theres who knows.. 6? 8 layers of denim? It won't always punch through. Do I just need a high power machine or should I go slow, change needle, etc?

Yeahn, a special denim needle and the machines at a jeans factory itself are made with metal gears, whereas a lot of machines now are made with plastic gearing. Be careful, because those gears can't take a lot of torque and you might end up frying your machine. Make a friend who has an old-school Husqvarna or industrial/commercial machine.

Marius Pontmercy
Apr 2, 2007

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With old machines, I would advise old, but not too old. A lot of them are going to eventually need parts and if you can't find something to either use for parts or a place to buy them, all you have is a conversation piece. If you had to choose between the two, I would say the first, although I'm not a fan of built-in machines, simply for the portability of a stand-alone.

Marius Pontmercy
Apr 2, 2007

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weakness posted:

I'm looking for some advice on what is probably a very simple question. I've recently lost about 50lbs and all of my dress shirts look massive on me. I can't afford a new wardrobe but luckily my wife has a sewing machine! Unluckily, she is as clueless as I am about how to use it. I've been attempting to take in the sides and massively puffy sleeves on a few of these shirts and the sides are very straight-forward. However, when I take in the sleeve I'm getting a bizarre puckering at the armpits. I haven't found any DIYs on this so I'm going off my gut, but my technique has been to sew up the sides first to about an inch above the armhole, where I speculate my arm stitch will be. Then I'll stop, rotate the shirt, and starting at the cuff begin taking in the sleeve until I get to the point where the arm stitch meets the side stitch. Again, this is producing pucker pit.

Where am I going wrong? Should this be one long continuous stitch from the cuff down to the bottom of the side? Should I be curving the stitch at the armpit rather than abruptly shooting off 90 degrees? Or am I doing this completely wrong and am supposed to be altering the arms a different way entirely? (and I'm sure a large part of the answer is the fact that I've been doing this for a day, but in my defense the stitches look straight.... somewhat)

Thanks in advance - it would be amazing if I could salvage all of these clothes.


Maybe I'm misunderstanding what you are doing/asking here, but are you clipping the fabric around the turn like this:


I got the picture from here which might have some tips: http://www.makeit-loveit.com/2010/08/sewing-tips-clipping-corners-and-curves.html

Marius Pontmercy
Apr 2, 2007

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Jyrraeth posted:

While the recipient of my gift is a goon, he isn't likely to check this thread. So GO AWAY if you are him, if you are not him then carry on.

I want to make my boyfriend a metroid-themed hoodie or shirt for Christmas. I was thinking of appliqueing a fabric metroid onto either piece of clothing and I would like it to be machine washable, though it doesn't have to be able to go through the dryer.
* Will there be much shrinking/warping with dissimilar fabrics?
* Is there a particular fabric you'd recommend for this? Those quilting Squares?
* If you had to choose between a hoodie/jacket type thing (can be thin) or a men's collared shirt, which would you choose?

Alternatively, I was thinking of making a metroid illustration in fabric to go on his wall, which might end up happening instead. Though I can't really decide which. I do have some hand-stitching experience and I do have a sewing machine that isn't set up yet.

You should be washing your fabric before you do applique, so it won't warp/shrink etc. Use fusible interfacing and just regular cotton woven fabric. There are lots of online tutorials for appliqueing. I'd say if you aren't super handy with a machine, an appliqueing project might not be the best for you, especially if it's not just straight lines. So if you can screen something onto a square and then applique it on, I'd do it like that.

Marius Pontmercy
Apr 2, 2007

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It seems almost terrible to cut it apart. Do you quilt? You could make a kind of muted front out of just strips even (greige, anyone?) and handquilt the pattern. It would be kind of a cool reversal of quilting, where the pieced part is the less fun part and it could also be a stealthily fun throw

Marius Pontmercy
Apr 2, 2007

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deadlysweet posted:

Not sure if this is the appropriate thread for my projects as I usually post in the Plush section.

I just started working with applique/embroidery on hoops but the fabric always slides! Any tips?!


Adorable work!

I've done very little needlework, but I hand-quilt a while bunch. My hand-quilting hoop has this tongue-and-groove thing that works so well, but I don't think you can get that in smaller sizes for embroidery hoops. Before I dropped like $20 for that hoop though, I had a cheaper wood one that I had a model-airplane rubberband wrapped around the inner hoop of, and for smaller hoops it's probably a lot more feasible.

Marius Pontmercy
Apr 2, 2007

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NancyPants posted:

Thanks Reverend Cheddar and Handbags at Dawn for chiming in on that bento box quilt. My initial problem was that for the longest blocks, I wasn't giving 1/4" seam, I was using 1/2" and didn't realize it. I've since figured it out, but I don't have my camera handy to show pictures of test blocks I made with scraps. They're pretty, though. It never occurred to me to make them as large blocks and cut them into quarters. I might do that when I get the fabric I actually want to make the quilt from. How do people approach the plain fabric on the backside? For say a full or queen-sized quilt, it doesn't seem like you can get fabric that wide. Do you just piece large pieces as necessary?


King sized flat sheets. I learned this from a long-arm quilter. I think up to a queen-sized quilt, you have enough yardage to cover the back of a quilt in one glorious piece. I get mine from TJ MAXX or a department store when their bedding is on sale. You can typically buy just a top sheet for a king size without having to buy the whole bed set.

Marius Pontmercy
Apr 2, 2007

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I made a thing today it is not very good:



It was my first time doing gathering, and other than a lot of swearing and (somehow) breaking two needles, it turned out pretty well. The fabric isn't the best in terms of how it lays and it kind of sticks out on the sides weird, but it's way comfortable and actually a cute length.

I literally have three more yards of this fabric that I need to do something with before September. It's a quilting calico that I really loved and might have bought 5 yards of. I've already backed a crib quilt with it.
Any ideas?

Marius Pontmercy
Apr 2, 2007

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zamiel posted:

Quite jealous of those dapper gentlemen. I got myself my sewing machine and such as an early Xmas gift since it was on sale on Black Friday. Just a Singer Traditional but I love it so far, mostly. I do have a problem though and hopefully someone here can shed some light on it, or maybe I should ask one of my doctors.

Pretext: I have fibromyalgia that's manifest in my back and neck, along with headaches. So when I'm doing my cutting with the rotary and mat, it doesn't take long before I start getting spasms in my mid back along my spine. This is the only thing that's ever caused these, so I'm thinking I'm screwing up somehow. Is it even possible to do it wrong? Maybe I'm hunched over too much or something?

I'm 5'5", my table is about 29" tall so I do have to bend over some when I'm working with it. I've tried moving it closer to me instead of in the middle of the table to no avail. Should I sit and reach instead? Should I just mark w/ chalk while I sit and use scissors? I dread going over to my craft table because I know 10-15 minutes into cutting things out, I'll just want to cry even with my painkillers. And sometimes it happens just sitting there sewing, but I think it's just being aggravated from the previous cutting. I guess I could finish my sewing machine cover I pieced together last week and find out. Just boggles my mind I can carry around a 17 pound pug one armed w/o much issue but something that should be so simple, isn't.

Is it the leaning, or the pressure required to use the rotary cutter that's causing problems. I'm on the smaller side (5'2") so I cut sitting on the floor with the mat on hardwood (I also mix batter and knead bread like this because I am a literal child) so that I can sit up straight with more physical leverage (instead of using muscles in my arms/shoulders/back) going into the rotary cutter. You could maybe sit on a cushion on the hard floor? I don't know if that helps at all.

Marius Pontmercy
Apr 2, 2007

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Shifty Pony posted:

I liked the bag I made so much that I decided to make a set, one more green and two blue/navy. I think I'm doing something wrong though on the straps because they are taking forever to do. They are made of a 2.5" strip of the "top" color and a 2" strip of the "bottom" color of the bag, 44" long. All long edges are folded over 1/2" and then the folded parts are placed facing each other and sewn together along the length, about 3/8" in from the edge of the larger width piece.

It is taking me around 30 minutes PER STRAP to pin everything into place, because I have to pin 4x 44" long 1/2" folds, then have to pin the two bits together, all without pressing because the fabric I'm using don't hold ironed creases so the seam gauge is getting used a ton. Is this just me being new-ish and slow, or is there some trick to this that I'm missing?


I tried two different seam locations, about 2/8" riding right on the edge of the "bottom" color, and the 3/8" inch called for (theoretically for both really, the seam wanders a bit when I accidentally yank a pin sideways when pulling it out or just in general because straight is hard). I kinda prefer the 2/8" look, it just seems cleaner to me (minus the wandering seams of course). I present to you 2 hours of work:



If you're not married to the way those handles look (and they are gorgeous, don't get me wrong), you can just use heavy-duty webbing for handles. I've whipped out canvas bags in under half an hour. Plus the webbing doesn't get dirty as easily as fabric does; still washable though.

For holding creases, have you tried spraying the fabric and really putting some pressure down on the iron? Your stuff should all be pre-washed before you start, so it won't make it shrink. Instead of using the seam gauge as well, you could use a chalk line to mark where you want the fold and measure once instead of four hundred times?

Marius Pontmercy
Apr 2, 2007

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Funhilde posted:

If there is a sewing /vacuum shop you can go to I recommend checking out what they have as well. Usually they have great service plans, refurbished machines and helpful staff. You can try the machine before you buy it as well. My serger even came with classes.

THIS THIS THIS. I think the main theme of my posts in this thread can be summed up as DON'T BUY NEW. You'll get better support, a better price and a better machine by buying through a local shop with someone who can fix your problem in the store instead of having to send it out. Plus, this is cheesy, but it keeps your money in your community instead of giving it to JoAnn's national clusterfuck. I never knew someone could be so passionate about small electric motors until I went to my parent's local vaccuum shop and took my machine in. It's the best! Sometimes there's even a shop dog. Always buy things from a place with a shop dog.

I'm back in a place with a machine for a bit and I'm brainstorming short projects. Any ideas?

Marius Pontmercy
Apr 2, 2007

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Bertrand Hustle I really don't think you need an industrial machine for denim. As I and several people have pointed out in the thread, most machines (especially older) can handle denim seaming with the right needle and some muscle. I've never worked with leather, but I assume if you're doing only two layers at a time, you wouldn't have much of a problem. Even if you wear through three used home machines in the next five years, you'll be out $300 instead of the $1000 you might spend on an industrial machine.

Marius Pontmercy
Apr 2, 2007

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http://www.mediatinker.com/blog/archives/008262.html

This link seems to have a free pattern with measurements. I have a thai fisherman skirt that I bought years ago that I love (and I never ever wear skirts), so I think when I get my machine back I'll be making a pair of these pants.

Marius Pontmercy
Apr 2, 2007

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So my roommates and friends are getting married late this summer. They have SO MUCH kitchen stuff, also they are lawyers, so all their lawyer friends and bosses are loaded and buying them things off their registry like $200 water pitchers from Crate and Barrel. I am not loaded. I can sew though, and I can sew quilts, so I was thinking of making them some sort of memory quilt with pictures contributed by their friends from college. Is this a tacky gift? They are not tacky people, but I thought it might be a cute thing for them to have like on a den couch or something.
I know this is totally doable, and I've helped with memory quilts in the past (although this one might be more involved because I'm going to surreptitiously copy things like their diplomas and I'd really like to get like short letters from their parents to put in there.

Marius Pontmercy
Apr 2, 2007

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HodjasBitch posted:

I second making a regular quilt. Gathering all of the photos and stuff and transferring them will be a pain in the rear end. Then, you won't want to stitch over them, and that limits your design and the longevity of the quilt. If you're so inclined, make a mini of the wedding invite maybe?

Oooooh that's a good idea. Maybe a quilt with the tag of the wedding invite on the inside? I'm thinking of a smaller wall-hanging but I'm worried quilted wall-hangings are really 80's and no one ever had the heart to tell me.

Marius Pontmercy
Apr 2, 2007

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Zratha posted:

You could make the quilt in the wedding colours, if they have a specific theme.

Her theme is dots, which makes sense. I talked to the bride's best friend and she thinks the bride would really like the idea. They've spent a lot of time away from each other, and they're going to be in different places for a year after the wedding, too.

I'm going to have a lot of time to handpiece things, so I was thinking of doing something really small around the border and then piecing the big squares. I'll do a border of dotted fabric, then 12 big squares that I can put pictures in.

The wedding is September 1st. I'm going to try and piece the top first so I can at least present it at the wedding. Then I can do the handquilting on it after the wedding.

Marius Pontmercy
Apr 2, 2007

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The first thing you make will be horrible-looking. I mean, maybe you will be the exception to this rule, but typically the first thing you make will look like it can only fit the Frankenstein Monster's left nutsack. I tell you this because it happens to everyone and you can't see it as a failure of your own.

My "secret" (irony quotes because I'm not especially talented, but it works with me) is to match my breathing up with my cutting to slow myself down. It works well for me, since I definitely have a tendency to rush through things for no reason.

Marius Pontmercy
Apr 2, 2007

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Sat down at my machine for the first time in about 14 months and cranked out four tote bags (two with handles, but I ran out of webbing) and an infinity scarf. Came to revel in my not-so-lost skills and Goldaline posts and makes me feel newbish again (just kidding. I think). For the totes, I was thinking of making a set for my girlfriend's family for Christmas. She has three adorable nephews and my mom made tote bags when I was 2 with my hand and foot prints all over them and it's kind of precious. My mother still uses hers, 23 years later!

Is there a way to make an art quilt that doesn't look like it's out of the 80s? I like the thought of a wall-hanging quilt but maybe it's just not a medium that translates well now.

Marius Pontmercy
Apr 2, 2007

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Rayon or polyester knit suede? It kind of looks like a faux camel-hair style coat. Thrifted?

Marius Pontmercy
Apr 2, 2007

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Nicol Bolas posted:

Completely insane question:

Is it possible to darn modern, spandex/lycra stockings? I have some 80ish denier H&M stockings and they have a rip. I love them because they are generally sturdy but there is a giant rip and my options are 1. wear it until they are unwearable 2. throw them away now and buy new ones or 3. try to mend them. Is 3 an option or am I crazy?

They are H&M. Buy new ones. They're literally like $6.

Marius Pontmercy
Apr 2, 2007

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So even though I've been sewing kind of on an off for more than ten years, I am terrified of doing garments. I sewed a formal dress for a freshman dance with a lot of help and kind of gave up on doing a lot of garment sewing. Recently someone gave me some realtalk (also I watch a lot of Project Runway) and I want to get back into doing it, so when I saw this dress form at a garage sale for $10 this morning, I bought it.

This is Roberta with some expert draping going on. She's already scared the poo poo out of me twice walking through my sewing area.

Marius Pontmercy
Apr 2, 2007

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holttho posted:

Definitely go to a thrift store or Goodwill. There will be a glut of cheapo sewing machines there. They may be ugly, jam-prone, and mind-boggling; but it will be heaven-sent in comparison to doing it by hand. Just make sure it has the manual.

I have a 1980's White machine that my mother got at a vacuum/sewing shop for less than $100, no manual. But if you have the model number and/or serial, you can find a PDF version of the manual online for free or very cheap.

Marius Pontmercy
Apr 2, 2007

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I imagine puff paint would work in a similar way, except it has a more precision tip, it probably would not bleed through as much, plus you could match the color to your project.

Marius Pontmercy
Apr 2, 2007

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Can you post a picture of the outside of the jacket?

Marius Pontmercy
Apr 2, 2007

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Contrast red top stitching? Real pockets, if they aren't already. If they are real, line them with the star fabric?

Marius Pontmercy
Apr 2, 2007

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For those of you who use standing cutting tables, are you able to still get enough leverage to do rotary cutting?

Marius Pontmercy
Apr 2, 2007

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Can you spray baste and paper-piece satin?

Marius Pontmercy
Apr 2, 2007

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IKEA lamp with an ugly paper lampshade (I abhor paper shades). I did a majorly stupid thing and ripped the lampshade off before I sewed on the fabric and ended up doing three different iterations before I finally got it the right way, not crooked and the correct height. Now I just need to do the other one of the set :suicide: <-- That is an appropriate amount of blood. I keep sticking my fingers.

Marius Pontmercy
Apr 2, 2007

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It's starting to get cold out, so I thought I would do a little stash-buster project since I have been hoarding scraps random projects for about two years now.

I gathered together all my scraps, squared them off and started cutting them into 3.5"x5" rectangles.

3 1/2 hours later, I have 268 rectangles. I think I just accidentally signed myself up for a queen-sized quilt. But what I should really post is fighting off 2 dogs who really wanted to be down on the floor with me. Also, my body hurts so bad. Oh my god.

Marius Pontmercy
Apr 2, 2007

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Or take the design wholesale and wrap the rest around a bolster pillow form. Put the lace around the trim.

Marius Pontmercy
Apr 2, 2007

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coyo7e posted:

I had an idea about making tote bags as gifts for the holidays this year and I'm not sure if it'd be best to get a bunch of blank fair-trade sourced fabric (I'm thinking duck canvas of some gauge), find a bunch of tote bags which I can verify weren't made in sweatshops and won't be cheap and crappy and which will have nice handles (then I could stencil on them, which would mostly mean making up or finding a good stencil for my word cloud idea), or maybe find some printed fabric with a sort of green/recycling type theme and incorporate it along with the canvas in totes I make.

Eventually the point is to do some recycling/green-energy/etc/etc stuff themed tote bags to give to my classmates and professors and family and friends, because plastic bags were banned around here, and also because I'm a hippy, and also because I'm in a college program which is oriented almost entirely on sustainability practises in water and energy and building construction. I want to make maybe 2-3 dozen bags at least, and incorporate some kind of recycling/themed pattern or stenciling either by adding patterned fabric, or directly stenciling on the finished bags with either a brush and stencil, or by carving some stamps and stuff.

Anybody who's made basic shopping-bag style canvas bags, who'd care to spitball at my ideas?

Yeah I'm aware however, the pain builds character according to how I was brought up :clint:

All the medical adhesives I've ever tried seemed to be essentially useless, I want something that is at least as strong as a couple coats of latex paint. :saddowns:

Are you using a machined basting stitch for the first fold? It is how I was shown to do it and it helps a ton, and you don't need to remove it because it gets turned inside anyway.

My mom did this 25 (yiiiikes) years ago for my grandparents and put my little 2 yr old handprints all over the bags in fabric paint. They both still have that bag and use it. Those were canvas with nylon webbing handles, but I'm not sure where to find a decent amount of organic cotton canvas. My mother, still a hippie, now uses plastic woven dog food and bird feed bags for her grocery bags. I have two that she gave me and they're pretty great and I actually use them as storage containers around the house rather than grocery bags because they stand up, BUT she also uses her heavy-duty 1980s Husqvarna machine to do those.

Your other option if you want to make the bags are ripstop "pillowcase" style bags where the handles are part of the bag and your sewing project would be putting trim around the raw edges, which you could buy pre-cut and folded.

Finally, if you want to ensure your fabric is ethically sourced, you could fuse plastic grocery bags together. There are tutorials on the internet for how to make the material, then use pre-made webbing for handles, since it does behave pretty fabric-like when fused.

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Marius Pontmercy
Apr 2, 2007

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A complete pain in the rear end to sew?

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