Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us money per month for bills, and since we don't believe in showing ads to our users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
 
  • Post
  • Reply
JustAurora
Apr 17, 2007

Nature vs. Nurture, man!

I love quilting! I made my husband a duck quilt for our second winter holiday together. I just started my first one since I bought a new sewing machine. It's a double sided one modified off of this concept: http://quilting.about.com/od/ragquiltpatterns/ss/floral_ragquilt.htm

Here is the front (minus border):


Here is the back (minus border):


A close up of the front:


A close up of the back:


I'm in the midst of joining all the pieces together (a LOT of whip stitching is involved). It'll end up being about 6.5 feet x 8.5 feet in the end.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

JustAurora
Apr 17, 2007

Nature vs. Nurture, man!

Asstro Van posted:

Can anyone recommend some good online resources for someone interested it making a first quilt? I'm comfortable sewing clothing and little projects like purses and catbeds, but I'd like some guidance before I tackle a project this big. My ultimate goal, which I'm sure will take a lot of smaller tries first, is to make a queen sized string quilt. I'm not really interested in making squares, unless that is a required learning foundation kind of thing. Guidance on fabric choice would be great too.

Honestly, if you have any sewing background, you can quilt. I did my first quilt in 2009 (for my boyfriend, now husband, who loves ducks), which took about 6 months most of which was cutting things out and reinforcement sewing.



The internet (as usual) is my best resource for learning new techniques but you have to search for it, because there are good things everywhere, I don't know a main resource (or at least don't personally use one strictly for quilting). A quick google showed me this site for learning how to do a string quilt: http://quiltville.com/stringquiltingprimer.shtml. About.com also has a nice section for different types of quilts and how to make them (http://quilting.about.com/). That's how I found my current double sided quilt I am making.

For a string quilt, I would ask around for other sewing friends to see if they have any remnants. I would also check out JoAnn's or Hancock fabrics and their remnant section. There are stores that specialize in quilting fabrics (mostly using Moda brand fabric), it's usually a little bit pricier, but the quality is really good. That duck quilt, which uses nicer fabric from a quilting store, is my husband and my main bedspread and it is holding up really well, and not fading even though it sits right next to our bedroom window. If you do buy quilt shop fabric, check and see if they have a discount club or something, you can end up getting back 10 - 20% of your purchase over the year or something close to that. The most important thing is making sure you're doing the math right to have enough fabric to do your whole quilt. You have to calculate the size of your strips, and how much you want of your various fabrics. If you have a walking foot with a quilting guide (like the silver bar in this image http://www.pfaffusa.com/4211_3467.html) that will help when it comes time to quilt your quilt top, batting, and backing together, unless you want to freehand it, or just eyeball it.

Another thing some people can forget (but as someone who sews, you probably already know), is that quilt != comforter. Usually quilts use a quilt batting, which can be pretty thin. I just buy that from Hancock (or another chain fabric/hobby store).

I hope that helps. Post progress! :)

JustAurora
Apr 17, 2007

Nature vs. Nurture, man!

Shifty Pony posted:

:stare: That quilt looks really close to one I had growing up :stare: Do you happen to have the patterns for the individual ducks? I could never do the whole quilt but I could probably manage to make some wall panels for the purpose of reminiscing.


I actually freehanded the duck pattern myself from looking at pictures of stained glass ducks. The patterns are at my parents' house, but I am meeting my mom for a mini-vacation in March, and can see if she could find/bring them along (assuming they're not in the trash somewhere or lost), and I could send them to you (along with probably some extra pieces from when I cut out ducks). PM me if that works for you.

Also, your bags are awesome, though those straps take forever, they look really sturdy! Fusible webbing is a good idea, but it can get a bit expensive sometimes. I usually just suck it up and spend way too long pinning/basting things, too.

JustAurora
Apr 17, 2007

Nature vs. Nurture, man!

Since we're on a quilt kick right now... I just finished my reversible sew as you go quilt on Friday!

Here is the 'Spring' side


An up close of the Spring side corner


The 'Summer' side


A Summer side corner


My dog got a little jealous for attention when I was cutting some extra threads...


It took about 10 months, though I didn't do much work on it for about three of those months due to moving, school work, and holidays.

JustAurora
Apr 17, 2007

Nature vs. Nurture, man!

HodjasBitch posted:

I finish them myself on a regular home machine. The first few were done with straight stitches, 1/4 inch from the seams of the blocks on either side. I've only been making them for just over a year, and learning to meander and stipple was scary, but fun. I dream of a mid-arm machine, though. Like this one. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=npTme2-RW-I

Watch some of Leah Day's videos on YouTube. Lots of inspiration there. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6nz0QwNv1AA

e: Is that a quilt as you go, JustAurora? I love two-sided quilts, but trying to baste and quilt them with everything lined up on both sides was a nightmare the old fashioned way. Yours is very pretty.

Yeah, it's quilt as you go, both the blocks and the border. It ended up being pretty easy that way, though the binding and sashing on one side is much prettier/better than the other. I've never tried meander/stippling quilting before... it is definitely something I want to work up to!

JustAurora
Apr 17, 2007

Nature vs. Nurture, man!

HodjasBitch, I love those colors! Do you a bigger picture showing more of it?

JustAurora
Apr 17, 2007

Nature vs. Nurture, man!

Those are cute, tetracontakaidigon, have you thought of posting in the plushie thread http://forums.somethingawful.com/showthread.php?threadid=3299745? (sorry if you have already!).

I just finished a play quilt for some friends who had a baby (...in January). Took me a week and a half. It's around 4.5' by 4.5'. So, not for the crib, but just to play on or whatever. I like it because the block is the Bright Hopes quilt block. Seems fitting for an awesome baby!





and the back is all this plain purple polka dot material

JustAurora
Apr 17, 2007

Nature vs. Nurture, man!

I have that exact machine and... it's not that great. See if you can take your wife to an actual sewing shop to test out other models. The decorative stitches don't work really well and are very finnicky when it comes to setting the tension just right. I also am annoyed at how the foot for regular stitching is more than 1/4 an inch wide, which makes it harder to eye seam allowances. It is alright for what it does at the price. But personally, I only use 2 or 3 of the 60 computerized stitches. Also, as someone who sews quilts, the tiny 'quilting table' that it comes with does not really help at all. The cover is nice for it, though!

JustAurora
Apr 17, 2007

Nature vs. Nurture, man!

For your quilt the biggest thing you need to do is make sure the batting is bigger than the top piece and the backing is bigger than the batting. You then need to baste the three together. I use big quilting safety pins to baste. You want to place every safety pin around 4 or so inches away from each other. You can use a walking foot or regular foot to quilt it together if you are only quilting in straight lines. If you want to do fancy quilting then you would need a different foot. After it's all quilted together *then* you can cut down the batting and backing to be the same size as your top piece. Then you bind. There are a Lot of great youtube videos on different types of quilting techniques, so I would look there as a resource.

JustAurora
Apr 17, 2007

Nature vs. Nurture, man!

I just saw that scented fabric on Massdrop this morning. Imagine making a quilt for your bed out of it... like having sex on fruit salad.

JustAurora
Apr 17, 2007

Nature vs. Nurture, man!

Agreed. You can't get bespoke pieces anywhere near fast fashion prices. Or t-shirt quilts. People seem to think those should be made cheaply. But no, they are a pain in the rear end.

JustAurora
Apr 17, 2007

Nature vs. Nurture, man!

I don't even use a rotary cutter. I mark with a pencil and use my fabric shears (get scissors just for fabric, and if anyone tries to use them for anything else, cut that bitch - but not with the fabric shears). I also suggest if you don't have a quarter inch seam foot, get one, then you don't really have to bother with pinning. There are a lot of good online tutorials. I like CrazyMomQuilts, she did a basic series, I believe. ModeaBakeShop has a lot of patterns and you can search for stuff by skill level. Quilting is the best. Enjoy spending all your money on fabric.

JustAurora
Apr 17, 2007

Nature vs. Nurture, man!

It can be hard, but it's not brain sergery.

Zig zag stitch will be your best friend.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

JustAurora
Apr 17, 2007

Nature vs. Nurture, man!

I know how to no-cut hem pants, but not no-cut taper.

I guess you could basically sew darts into the jeans.

https://blog.colettehq.com/tutorials/tutorial-sewing-darts

I think it'd look rather funky though.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply