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trickybiscuits
Jan 13, 2008

yospos


Prophet 60091 posted:

So speaking of guys sewing guy-clothes, I need more inspiration for stuff to make besides PJs. Has anyone sewn any good mens clothes? Unless I get distracted by something, I might try and replicate a utilikilt next.
Burda has some good patterns for men- mostly medium level of difficulty, but they're a lot more stylish than men's patterns from the big three patternmakers (Butterick, Simplicity, McCalls). Of course the best way to learn how something is put together is to take it apart. When a pair of comfortable jeans wears out, take a seam ripper to it and save the pieces to use for a pattern- that's how I learned how to sew pants.

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trickybiscuits
Jan 13, 2008

yospos


clam 2 posted:

Does anyone have a good guide/tips on sewing a button fly for trousers? I am having trouble finding good literature. This is my first time making a fly of any sort.
Buy a secondhand pair of button fly pants and take them apart? That's how I learned how to put a zipper in a pair of pants.

trickybiscuits
Jan 13, 2008

yospos


Shnooks posted:

Your dress looks gorgeous but all I could think was "gently caress LINEN". I did a bunch of studio work with linen last semester and it was a nightmare. I made a happi, like a short kimono that doesn't cross over and Japanese people wear it on festival days, out of linen. gently caress. That. poo poo.
What do you dislike about linen? I've worked with it a lot and my only complaint is that it frays.

trickybiscuits
Jan 13, 2008

yospos


I finally have something to post in this thread!

I do historical reenactment, I got into it for the clothes so it's important to me to make new stuff for events. Late last year I found a fantastic reproduction cotton print, very similar to late 18th century prints.

Here's the plan:


And here's the result!


The bodice wrinkles are totally period by the way.



I wore it to a 1770s reenactment a few weeks ago. Another reenactor who is a historic hair genius did my hair (the front is brushed up over a roll, the back is braided and curled although you can't really see). I'm wearing the dress over two petticoats, a chemise and stays (early corset), and hip pads and a bustle to shape the skirt.

I'll post more pictures if anybody is really interested. I worked on it on and off for six months; it's completely hand-sewn. Fortunately dresses of this time period go together very quickly and you can use a fairly large running backstitch, especially on seams that don't get a lost of stress, such as skirt seams. The only thing that gave me any trouble was sleeves. That's about the only thing that ever gives me any trouble though so I'm used to it. If I'd known how to handle the sleeves and really put my mind to it, I could probably have made the dress in a week or two.

trickybiscuits
Jan 13, 2008

yospos


Wow, thanks you guys! It all seems so easy when I'm doing every little step so I'm glad people here are impressed.

18th-century gowns could be made very quickly- there are records of a group of women sewing a single gown in a day, and one of my friends sewed most of a gown herself in a weekend workshop. Gowns used valuable fabric so they were made to be taken apart and remade easily, and there are tricks to make them come together quickly. I sewed pretty much everything except the cap, but there's a lot of machine-sewing in the other things.

I'm also really used to hand-sewing and while it's slower I feel it gives more control. Plus it's easy to carry around. It's like what I do instead of knitting.

amishsexpot, that's hand-ruching- it's like hand-gathering a ruffle but you gather and sew down both sides of the strip of fabric instead of just one. I want to add more around the sleeves too.

trickybiscuits
Jan 13, 2008

yospos


Goldaline posted:


Front, with the sleeves open.

I go into a lot more detail about construction and what not on my blog. This piece was shown at the Philadelphia Museum of Art Craft Show and it actually sold! I was shocked and so so pleased!
Don't be surprised! It's spectacular. It has a great historical look- open hanging sleeves are so Renaissance, and the trim reminds me of 1860s soutache decoration in a sort of Celtic/Art Nouveau design.

Your blog is terrific, I'm going to go to it whenever I need inspiration to get to work. After going through it the other night I buckled down and started work on a patchwork square (might go back and fix the wonky yellow bit in the lower right-hand corner):



I made it because recently I got a part-time job at a fabric store, and while other employees do knitted or crocheted samples, nobody sews. So I picked three cotton prints that looked Civil War-era-ish and put together this square. But from now on I'll probably concentrate on things like seasonal decorations and doll clothes- I don't have a huge amount of patience for patchwork. (I'd love to do applique quilts, though.)

The store also doesn't doesn't have much in the way of quilting stuff- no books or patterns or anything. There's just not enough room. It's a pretty awesome place. Sort of a fabric rummage sale. In theory I'm working there to pay off my credit card bill and get my car stereo fixed, but probably a good chunk of my paycheck will go to buying more fabric, so I need all the sewing inspiration I can get.

trickybiscuits
Jan 13, 2008

yospos


Goldaline posted:

I just love awful tiny fiddly patchwork. Now that my t-shirt quilt is done I've started the slow, horrible process of making a Dear Jane quilt. I'm using all solids (I'm not a big print person) in bright contrasting colors and I'm going to sash and back it with gray.

I just finished Row A! Doing them all by hand with freezer paper.
It's wonderful. How big is each patch?

trickybiscuits
Jan 13, 2008

yospos


Cleaned my room recently so there is now fabric in plastic tubs under the bed, stacked on some shelves of the bookcase, in boxes (plastic and cardboard) stacked up in a few corners, and probably in some other places too. But I'm planning quilts now so some of those cotton prints will be out of the stash!

Here's some of the Christmas present potholders I made for my co-workers. The patchwork was all right but the bias tape edging was a nightmare and took ages. There are eleven total and my brother has been instructed to clobber me if I ever decide to do something like this again. But at least they're kind of cute!

http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/526/dscn1121x.jpg/



edited because, darn Imageshack links . . .

trickybiscuits
Jan 13, 2008

yospos


Silver Alicorn posted:



I haven't done any sewing in a while, but I got this fabric from a friend and couldn't help myself. It's entirely sewed by hand as I don't have a machine right now, and it was a pretty big learning experience. Backstitching seems to make a pretty strong seam, but we'll see how it holds up over time.

I have no idea how I summoned up the patience to finish the whole thing in one marathon session, but there it is. I followed this pattern if anyone's interested.
Nobody has said well done for sewing by hand yet so I will say it- good for you! The more you do, the better you will get and the more you will be used to it. And backstitching by hand is very sturdy.

trickybiscuits
Jan 13, 2008

yospos


Goddimus posted:

Forgive me if something similar has been asked. I started reading from the beginning of the thread but going back to 2007 is a major task.

I first want to say that I have a lot of respect for people who can make their own clothes. I have been on the search for a seamstress to make a 16th century Italian renaissance doublet/farsetto and it is incredibly hard to find someone who has a page that looks like it has been updated at least once since 1998. I need the thing by October so I am wondering how hard it would be to 1) pick up the art of sewing and 2) sew a piece like that in about 4 months.
Take a look at some of the directions on the Tudor Costume Page. The page hasn't been updated in a while but I've used the directions there for making a kirtle and sleeves and they've worked well. Jen Thompson at https://www.festiveattyre.com has done some research on Italian clothing, mostly women's, but there's some basic stuff there too. Right now she's moving her research articles over to her new site so not everything is up yet.

If you want to post pictures or whatever we can talk more over in the cosplay/costume thread, it would be good to get some historical stuff going on in there until my lazy rear end buckles down and gets some 1812 clothes done: http://forums.somethingawful.com/showthread.php?threadid=3473045&userid=0&perpage=40&pagenumber=1

eta this file seems to have good information as well although it's trying to concentrate on English clothing rather than Italian.

Alternately you could just try to contact someone in the local Society for Creative Anachronism chapter.

Geeked out a bit there, 'scuse me.

trickybiscuits fucked around with this message at 05:10 on Jul 21, 2012

trickybiscuits
Jan 13, 2008

yospos


An alternative might be to join up with your coworkers, choose a simple commercial robe or coat pattern, and then find a professional tailor or seamstress who would do a batch of lab coats with whatever modifications you need. Doing several together would mean that the production could be done more quickly, assembly-line style, and you might be able to save a bit of money on materials. You could also include things like snaps instead of buckles/buttons, velcro belts and cuffs to fit the coat to the wearer, double-breasted fronts so there's an extra layer of fabric across your front. The price still wouldn't be low but it wouldn't be outlandish either and if you have your own lab coat you could use it for years before it needs to be replaced.

ETA: or learn to sew. It's a good skill.

trickybiscuits fucked around with this message at 22:02 on Feb 1, 2014

trickybiscuits
Jan 13, 2008

yospos


Goldaline posted:

If you remember last time I post I was sort of falling down a rabbit hole of serging and stretch fabric. Well, I think I've finally got my applique technique nailed down (stick and wash-away interfacing is the key!), so I tackled a biggish project.



I've been having fun interpreting really traditional textile patterns/techniques onto really athletic clothing. This one is based on Balitmore Album applique quilts from the mid to late 1800's. It was my first time really using the Stick and Washaway interfacing and holy crap does it make a difference. Also my first time really altering a stretch fabric pattern, it's so different than working with wovens. It had to be made in sections to allow the applique to be done flat.

Anyway if anyone's interested I wrote up a little tutorial on my technique (which is very, uh, not-proper due to machine limitations) I could post.
I love Baltimore album quilts! This is ingenious and it looks amazing.

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trickybiscuits
Jan 13, 2008

yospos


Colonial Air Force posted:

Hello sewing goons!

Quick background: I reenact the American War for Independence.

I'm making a double-breasted coat (this pattern) and it calls for welted pockets. I have never done a welted pocket, and the instructions are a little confusing.

Anyone have any good tips or tutorials? I'm reaching out to my reenactment unit, too, but the more help the better!
I just learned how to do this! With a group of friends who are all making their own breeches. Be patient and practice a bunch on scrap cloth until you have things the way you want. It's a tricky technique but it looks so nice.

Crocobile posted:

Hancock Fabrics is going out of business and is currently selling everything for 20% - 50% off! I'm guessing the sales might get more intense as they get more desperate to empty the stores. Most of the patterns are currently 50% off!
I just got back from visiting my brother in California and got into a Hancock fabrics for the first time ever- I desperately wanted to go around to all the fabric stores that aren't in my region, but I had no car and nobody would drive me, so I convinced everyone to go to a mall that had a Hancock's in it and got my fix there. Nothing of value to add, I just like that I got into a Hancock's Fabric one time before they closed.

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