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madlilnerd
Jan 4, 2009

a bush with baggage

seriouslywtf posted:

Thanks to some encouragement from the ladies in IRC, here are a handful of projects I have finished recently:





(^^ that's an ottoman)

I have another coat that I made that I'm really proud of, but I want to take a new picture of it before posting, because the only picture I have is pretty wrinkly.

I love those! That Ottoman is amazing and the cat bag is so cute!

I got a sewing machine for christmas, but I haven't got round to sewing anything yet due to lack of peripherals. I have fabric. I *now* have thread. Just pins to go! (sporadic shopping due to lack of foresight.

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madlilnerd
Jan 4, 2009

a bush with baggage

Goldaline posted:

So the hair chair is completed!

So. Much. Weave.

Oh... god... Is that real hair? I feel itchy just looking at it.

madlilnerd
Jan 4, 2009

a bush with baggage

Inspired by crazy veterans on the simpsons, I give you THE RAG FLAG:

punk-a-licious. (AKA- oh god I'm so out of practice with my sewing machine)

Only registered members can see post attachments!

madlilnerd
Jan 4, 2009

a bush with baggage

I like making quilt blocks, but I hate all that cutting out- I measure and use scissors and end up spending 45mins cutting and then 10mins actually sewing. Are there any shops that sell it all cut out ready for you to piece? Or is there any other way I can reduce the cutting time?

madlilnerd
Jan 4, 2009

a bush with baggage

seriouslywtf posted:

A kimono-style dress out of bamboo jersey:


That looks so comfortable but smart enough to get away with at work. What's bamboo like to work with? Does it have a similar feel to cotton, or is it slippery?

madlilnerd
Jan 4, 2009

a bush with baggage

Triangulum posted:

Does anyone know where I should look to get some custom stone jewelry? I really want this meteorite I have made into a pair of plugs. Most likely it'd end up being a metal plug with a slice of the meteorite set in the face. Any ideas where I could find someone who could do this? I'm at a loss.

Find someone who's style you like on Etsy and then ask them to do it for you would be my guess. Or go to a local craft/art fair?

madlilnerd
Jan 4, 2009

a bush with baggage

Ozma posted:

I have a zillion scraps/fat quarters given to me by my granny in law that I'm trying to burn through and it's taking forever. It's unfortunate because I'm way too lazy to do any complicated piecing.



I love your sock monkey print; do you know where you got it from or was it just from your granny?

And Handbags At Dawn, that cushion is very sweet. Lots of squealing teenage girls would pay for something like that- your daughter could earn some serious cash if she wanted to.

madlilnerd
Jan 4, 2009

a bush with baggage

Cross_ posted:

Just a quick question: what kind of fabric is commonly used for T-shirts and other stretchy garments?
I just finished my first sewing project (yay!) and while the shirt came out decent enough the fabric feels kind of coarse on skin. What should I look for on the fabric labels to know it will be comfortable when worn?

That type of fabric is called jersey knit (or at least that's what I've heard it called). If you look closely at t-shirt fabric you can see that it's actually knitted, not woven. Jersey knit is usually available in cotton or poly-cotton mixes and can sometimes be found in bamboo or rayon mixes. It generally comes in a wide range of colours, but I've only ever been able to get it online as fabric shops in my vicinity only stock woven cottons and sari fabric.

madlilnerd
Jan 4, 2009

a bush with baggage

Goldaline posted:

Ahaha, so I've been working on these feathered leggings/pants for a few days. I finally put the on someone...and wow, they look a lot more like gorilla legs than I anticipated.

Oh well! They're due Thursday so I guess that's just how it's going to be.

I love them! But I see what you mean about gorilla legs. They'd probably look more birdy if you get your model to wear killer heels.

madlilnerd
Jan 4, 2009

a bush with baggage

I'm currently making a fairly tailored womens jacket with darts, but do I need to put darts in the lining too?

madlilnerd
Jan 4, 2009

a bush with baggage

Goldaline posted:

So I finally made some shoes! I've been wanting to forever-never got up the courage. They came out a little wonky, but it was a good learning experience.I think next time, trying it without cording might be good, that made the sole/upper connection a little tough.


:aaa: WOW. Those are gorgeous. How do they look from the back?

madlilnerd
Jan 4, 2009

a bush with baggage

I really shouldn't post this here as the person I'm making it for is a goon (KYLE STOP LOOKING AND GO DO SOMETHING ELSE, WHAT ARE YOU EVEN DOING IN THE SEWING THREAD?), but I'm very excited.

I just finished my first quilt top ever! It's about as accurate as a blind person playing DDR, but I'm still really pleased with how it came out. The pattern I used (well, sort of, only I didn't follow it very accurately) was the maple leaf block from Quilter's Cache.

In the aerial shot taken from my rickey Ikea chair, the border looks purple, but it's really more of a dark red. It was the left over lining from the jacket I've been making (I need to get that finished so I can beg for more attention). The backing is going to be this white fabric with tiny rosebuds printed on it, and I don't have enough batting, so I'm using some white fleece I found that's the perfect size. This will probably mean I end up with a less squishy quilt, but it should still be warm, right?

Only registered members can see post attachments!

madlilnerd
Jan 4, 2009

a bush with baggage

Calvervtutrp posted:

Oh god, you must have amazing patience. I love quilts but I can't bring myself to try it, because it just looks so loving hard. I can barely finish a simple dress without getting distracted (I always have about 10 unfinished projects lying around) so I can't imagine taking on something like that.

...I always get jealous.

Those were pretty much my thoughts for the longest time, and I put off making quilts because of it (bar punk-rear end crazy patchwork which is like sewing and having a grand mal seizure at the same time). It was only when I was in Hawaii working on the goon island project that I took it up. We were in a tiny place called Volcano that had 2 general stores, a diner, a Thai restaurant and, for some bizarre reason, a quilting shop.

Just go for it- choose a simple block from The Quilter's Cache and make a block a week or whenever you've got a spare half an hour. A rotary cutter is a pain to learn to use, but once you get the hang of it it's your best friend; believe me I tried making a few blocks a while back with scissors and spent about 2 hours just cutting out. As long as you set out your workspace beforehand with an ironing board, cutting mat and sewing machine, it doesn't take long to make a block, especially if you pick up little speed piecing tips.

And as for "looking so drat hard"- that's the point! You can fool non quilters into thinking you've spent years making the thing! The best thing, for me, is that I don't have to care about fit- I made a few dresses this year and none of them had that great a fit because I'm very lazy with seam allowances and make it up as I go along.

Putting it all together was a bit hair raising though. Everytime I went to quilt a leaf I freaked out and thought I would gently caress it up because it's hard to manouver something that big. I think if I go to make a bigger one (I want to try the monkey wrench pattern next!) then I might quilt it by hand in big running stitches instead, or even pay for a longarm quilting service.

Don't worry about having a million unfinished projects to hand, as long as you eventually get around to finishing them. In the past month I've been tying up a lot of loose ends (or rather sewing them in, haha) and managed to finish a baby jumper I've had on hold and a giant rainbow crochet blanket.

Handbags at dawn- in my ditziness, I didn't prewash any of the fabrics or the fleece I used to I haven't got a clue about shrinkage or colour runs. If I give instructions to only wash at low temperatures and to use a colour catcher sheet to catch any dye runs, do you think it will be safe? Or should I tell MY BOYFRIEND to handwash only?

madlilnerd
Jan 4, 2009

a bush with baggage

The blocks were made from fat quarters that I got from various fabric shops (including a quilting shop) in Hawaii. The backing is 100% cotton from a fabric warehouse in Hilo and the sashing was leftover from a jacket lining I made- it's 100% cotton again I think, or maybe poly-cotton.

As for the fleece, I have a feeling it's acrylic or polyester and it's like the stuff they make really lightweight children's blankets from. I have a feeling I originally bought it to make toy polar bears with, although I have no idea how big of one I was planning to make with 2 bloody metres of the stuff!

I'd like to make more quilts but from what I've seen fabric is a lot more expensive in England than it is over in the states so I don't know if I could do it as a viable craft. I don't think I paid more than $2.50 for a fat quarter over there, and the backing was something ridiculous like $3 a yard too. If I want to use nice high quality fabric instead of cheap polycottons I'm looking at paying anywhere from 2 to 4 for fat quarters and 5 a metre for my backing.

madlilnerd
Jan 4, 2009

a bush with baggage

handbags at dawn posted:

Fabric is more expensive over there, I never can tell if it's just one of those things that's inexplicably more expensive in England or if quilting is not as popular there and kind of a "niche" thing.

It's not just quilting, it's craft in general, which is really sad. Nowadays, making your own stuff is seen as either something you do because you're a lesbian artschool hippy, or you're a middle class woman with too much time on her hands. Going into Walmart this year (it was on my list of things to do in US) I was amazed by the range of craft stuff in a centralised store- not just lame "make your own cards!" crap, but bolts of fabric and yarn etc. The closest we have to that in the UK is WHSMiths which is a glorified newsagent that has a pitiful art section (e.g 2 sizes of sketchbooks and a pack of sketching pencils) which sometimes has a "learn to sew/knit/crochet" box in the kiddie section.

Like most things in the UK, this can probably be blamed on THE WAR. People probably got sick of the "make do and mend" mentality of the 30s-40s-50s and then people who grew up in the 60s were probably embarrassed by their awful hippy parents with their homemade goods. That, and I think a lot of adults in the UK just don't have hobbies. They work jobs they hate and then come home and watch poo poo telly.

Thank god for the internet is all I can say.

madlilnerd
Jan 4, 2009

a bush with baggage

Beep Street posted:

Where the hell do you live, rural Lincolnshire or something? I'm in the UK too and there are several MASSIVE fabric stores near me, a giant Hobbycraft warehouse place and loads of little bead and knitting shops.

I live in Slough. It's an industrial wasteland about 20 miles outside of London. The only fabric I can get around here is sari fabric from Indian clothes stores, or the polycotton poo poo from my local "haberdashery" which sells safety pins, 3 kinds of buttons and 10 shades of acrylic yarn. There's a Hobbycraft in Reading, but it's always poo poo (badly kept, crap layout, rubbish overpriced fabric, damaged goods) and difficult to get to (I don't drive). Apart from that, in terms of fabric... hmm. There's a tiny Aladdin's cave of fabric on the industrial estate in Uxbridge, which is again pretty difficult to get to without a car, oh and there's John Lewis in Reading, which IMO really overprices a lot of their fabric and other haberdashery products.

So yeah, my local selection on yarn and fabric is pretty lovely. Craft just isn't popular in my town.

madlilnerd
Jan 4, 2009

a bush with baggage

handbags at dawn posted:

I(I have to laugh at your 20 miles outside London when I drove 90 miles to go to the movies Saturday though...it's all a matter of scale I guess)

Someone once told me that the difference between an American and a Brit is that an American thinks 100 years is a long time, and a Brit thinks 100 miles is a long way. Seriously, I live 100 miles from my Grandma and get to see her maybe once every 2 years.

The sari idea could work I guess. It would be pretty translucent though and all the sequins would dig into you when you rolled around on it. If you have a problem getting hold of cheap sari stuff where you are, I would be happy to get hold of some for you... I feel a stash swap coming on. Being in an Indian clothing shop is gorgeous, it's like being surrounded by rolls of gems, but it's just not my style. I'm pretty boring with colours.

madlilnerd
Jan 4, 2009

a bush with baggage

Everyone complains about Slough, but we've been making vaccines, paint and Mars bars for years now and no one has the guts to complain about those :colbert:

Anyway, my advice on going sari shopping is to take an Indian friend with you, especially if you are going to a strong Indian area, like Chalvey or Southall. Oh, and don't be afraid to barter, especially if you're buying a lot, they are quite often happy to come down on price.

And as for being a fabric noob- just explore and experiment. If you gently caress up, who cares? You can always cut it up and make it into something else. The first few things I made were beyond horrible, but they were good practice.

madlilnerd
Jan 4, 2009

a bush with baggage

combee posted:

How many metres of material would I need for a long-sleeved A-line dress like so?


I'm not using a pattern so I don't really have a guide.

Are those pleats in it?

I squeezed a 3/4 length sleve hooded tunic dress from a blanket that was about 1.5m x 2.75m. So to be safe, I'd say about 3.5m, maybe a little bit more. I cock up a lot, so I like to have extra material.

madlilnerd
Jan 4, 2009

a bush with baggage

Cawie McFuckyou posted:

So my question is, is it a horrible, disastrous idea to go out shopping for quilt fabric without a definite plan? I'm not sure how much fabric I need, as it is much smaller than a normal quilt and I'm not sure know how many different fabrics I will end up using. I had planned on just buying a yard or two of whatever I liked, depending on how many different fabrics I end up with, and yay for leftovers.

Any encouragement or words of caution?

I am a very spontaneous person anyway, but was especially so with my first (last and only so far) quilt. I just went to the shop and grabbed about 10 fat quarters in various shades of orange and brown. It turned out I had a little less than I needed, so I padded it out with red sashing (left over fabric from a jacket lining) and it was still a little small, so I told my boyfriend to lose weight.

I would recommend you have an idea of the end result you want to achieve though- at least have the basic shape or pattern decided before you go colour grabbing. I knew I was going to do the maple leaf block, so I chose autumnal colours. It also depends on how far you live from a fabric source. If you're really far away and you run out, can you be bothered to go back and get some more?

So basically... have a rough idea of what you want to achieve and jump off from there. Also, wait for one of the more competant quilter goons to post.

madlilnerd
Jan 4, 2009

a bush with baggage

nolen posted:

My very first sewing experience. I made the pattern from scratch while bored at work and I think he turned out pretty good for a first try!

here he is being saucy:


Thanks again to Bagelworm for the help!

Are you kidding me? For a first time sewing project from a pattern you designed yourself, he is nothing short of fantastic. I wish to pass a motion that he has his own pair of glasses so he doesn't have to use yours.

Buuut, some people, eg my mum who just looked over my shoulder, think that visible/contrasting stitches look scruffy, so maybe next time use matching thread?

madlilnerd
Jan 4, 2009

a bush with baggage

CutiePie posted:


Is reverse stitch essential? or Can I just turn the fabric round and sew and then turn it again in the other direction?


Reverse makes starting and finishing so much easier. It would be a huge hassel to turn something large (e.g a dress) around every time you needed to do a seam.

madlilnerd
Jan 4, 2009

a bush with baggage

concreteelephant posted:


I bought this fabric:

Has anyone else ever worked with large print fabric like this before? What did you use it for?

With large novelty prints like that I generally cut out the motifs and applique them onto other things. A friend of mine bought some Carebear fabric where each of the bears was around 5 inches- she just cut them all out and stuck them on other stuff.

Another suggestion would be curtains or a large circle skirt, but I don't think you have enough.

I have a fair few friends who would kill for one of those creepy anime hug pillows patterned with that fireman stuff.

madlilnerd
Jan 4, 2009

a bush with baggage

concreteelephant posted:

hey, thanks to you all for the ideas. I liked madlilnerd's idea of the apron, but I don't use them. The kitchen theme stayed with me though and I ended up making these:



Unfortunately I am terrible at quilting but I imagine they will function just fine.

So, thanks for the input everyone!

I NEEED THESE.

Seriously I want these even more than a PS3 or a place at St Martins doing ceramics.

MUST HAVE SEXY GLOVES.

And it was Handbags at Dawn who suggested something useful like an apron. I wanted you to make it into a creepy hug pillow. I really like the oven glove thing though because they're firemen and the oven is hot (leave me alone I gave blood today and then drank Red Bull and now feel odd)

BTW, I am in the middle of making a quilt for a friend and need some advice. I'm making it out of fabric recycled from other things (60s pillowcases, a skirt with a stain on it, etc) and I fear it's starting to look too busy. The block I'm using is Mary's triangle, and I've got a consistant background of navy blue, with all kinds of crazy colours and prints next to it. Can there be such a thing as too busy, or will the dark blue balance everything out? :ohdear:
I'm starting to think that this is just a process I go through with quilts because I felt the same on the leaf block one and it turned out fine. I don't have any money for nice planned colour schemes :(

madlilnerd
Jan 4, 2009

a bush with baggage

It all started out with this pair of curtains I found in a secondhand shop for 2.50. They were covered in squares with animals in so I bought them, cut the squares out and then looked for something to do with them. There's a book I've had for a while called Quick Colourful Quilts which I'd never gotten round to using, but it had this design called Moulin Rouge that really appealed to me. It was made from the Mary's Triangle using a red background and 12 fat quarters.
Only I didn't have any money, or 12 fat quarters, just these animal squares and whatever else I had in my room. In the quilt in the book, the square in the block was 3inches, so I trimmed the animal squares down into a neat 5in, did some math to work out the rest and made larger squares- ~9in.

The other squares and the triangles are made from dressmaking left overs, 1960s pillowcases (25p each from the same second hand shop), a few fat quarters I bought in Hawaii and some bits and bobs my mum had. The navy background is all offcuts from a project of my mum's, so the only thing I'm going to have to buy is the batting and backing (unless I make a Frankenstein crazy quilt backing, although I'd like to get this done buy my friend's bday- Jan 5)




Having laid it out, I actually really like it! There's way too much of that yellow pillowcase in there though, so I'm going to ban myself from using it. I banned myself from using the pink gingham earlier because there was way too much of it. It's eventually going to measure 6 x 8 blocks, and I really should stop procrastinating because Mary's triangle is super quick to piece AND you make 2 blocks at once.

madlilnerd
Jan 4, 2009

a bush with baggage

handbags at dawn posted:

That will look really nice. :) It is a nice mix of crazy prints, but the pattern is still really evident (which you want, otherwise it's just a jumble). I like the yellow pillowcase in there for what it's worth - it and the green pattern give the eye a nice calm place to go to next to the bolder prints.

I was amazed how much fabric you get when you open up a pillowcase, so I'll definitely be buying those again. If I was a little skinnier and a better dressmaker, I probably could've made a shift dress out of the yellow one. When I ripped open the seams, decades of gross dirt and lint fell on me despite having washed it :cry:

I just really hope my friend likes it. If she doesn't, I guess I'll just smother her with it and give it to a grateful hobo.

madlilnerd
Jan 4, 2009

a bush with baggage

Calvervtutrp posted:

I have a question... Have any of you ladies tried making your own bras? I'd like to try, as it would be much better than spending $35-75 every time I need a new goddamn tit-holder, but it seems more difficult than it should be.
I think after I got the supplies and got the first one done I'd be good to go, and could start cranking them out, but... I'm not sure where to start. I'm having a hard time even finding the right size underwires, and I think foam cups are completely out of the question so it looks like I'll be doing soft-cups. If anyone has good resources for stretch lace, bra straps, etc. I'd love to see them.

If you're serious about making your own bras, see if anywhere in your area does lingerie courses. Some places that teach patternmaking or tailoring also cover bra making.
As far as I'm aware, it IS fairly difficult, which is why bras cost so much. Part dressmaking, part structural engineering.

madlilnerd
Jan 4, 2009

a bush with baggage

Goldaline posted:


Me making the face that means "my head is being crushed and also it is a million degrees in here"

You look like a woolen warrior :3:

The level of detail is beautiful though; I especially like the outer sleeves/armguard things.

madlilnerd
Jan 4, 2009

a bush with baggage

I finished, woo! I also totally cheated again. It's not a sandwich like a quilt should be. It's two layers sewn together like you would sew a duvet cover (inside out) and then turned right side out and the gap sewn up by hand.
With the exception of the 2 fat quarters I bought on holiday, the backing and the trim, all the fabric used in the patchwork is an offcut from something else or was something else in it's past life. For example, the animal squares which began the whole thing are from a pair of curtains. The red flower print was leftover from a skirt my mum made me. The yellow print used to be a 1960s' pillowcase. Including everything used in its contruction, the entire cost of this quilt comes to around 14.



The back is a fleece blanket with penguins on :3:

madlilnerd
Jan 4, 2009

a bush with baggage

handbags at dawn posted:

You didn't cheat! They call that method "birthing" a quilt. It looks cute and the prints are fun :)

I like how some of the rows "leak out" into the edge, too.

Oh cool, I'd never heard of this method, it just seemed like an easy shortcut. I honestly don't think my friend will care that I didn't sit there hand stitching through layers of organic cotton batting.

It's funny you mention the "leaks". My mum didn't understand them. She was staring at them and poking them and kept asking why they were there. "uh.. it's the design, mum. That's how they did it in the book..."

The only thing I don't really like about it is it's quite a juvenile design. You don't look at it and think "classy and grown-up". Although I did lay it out on my parent's bed earlier (they have plain navy bedding) and it didn't look horrendous, so it passes in my eyes.

madlilnerd
Jan 4, 2009

a bush with baggage

Artemisia posted:




That's exquisite. I really really like it.

And your little birds are very sweet!

madlilnerd
Jan 4, 2009

a bush with baggage

stars posted:

She is developed, and very short. Big belly, 'baby fat' type chubby, she does not look like she will be a big girl all her life, know what I mean? I am thinking of buying some adult plus size patterns made for a and use fabrics and trims to make the into tween style clothing. I've been looking at options of stuff just to buy and it' so depressing, I want her to look cute and trendy and fun, and not like an old lady or little kid. :(

That's a pretty good description of me aged 12 :smith:

In other news, I finally got round to finishing the main structure on my jacket. It's from a 70s pattern, but I dropped the stupid decorative pockets (seriously, they were tiny) and put a polycotton lining in to make it look more professional. All I've got left to do now is make a covered button and a buttonhole.



The fabric is a Cath Kidston corduroy. Cath Kidston cottons sell for about 14 ($19) a metre, so I presume that this would've been pretty expensive brand new. My mum nabbed it on Freecycle!



That weird blue thing underneath is a top I was making out of old pyjamas, but I've abandoned it and might chop it up again to make a toy.

Anyway, do you think the jacket would sell on Etsy? It's too tight across my manly shoulders and makes me look like a hunchback children's entertainer, but I'm sure there's someone out there who would look good in it.
If you do think it would sell, how much for? And if you don't... what should I chop it up into? :haw:

madlilnerd
Jan 4, 2009

a bush with baggage

Schistosity posted:

Came back from Jo Ann's yesterday with some beautiful fabric that I just had to buy. So I decided to make an awesome skirt!





Since it's just cotton, I wanted some additional weight so I lined it with some white muslin. After a wash, it'll hang quite nicely. It's the first clothing item I've sewn in probably 5 years. I forgot how enjoyable sewing is.

Is that a galaxy print with planets and nebulas and what not?

madlilnerd
Jan 4, 2009

a bush with baggage

Are they cut or intact? I'm kind of interested in the second Simplicity one, 8077 and MCalls 9727, but I have no idea how much they're worth and if you'd ship them out to England.

Your best bet would probably be to sell them on Ebay. My mum sold a few from the 70s and they went for around 8 each ($11). I guess it depends how many vintage obsessed people find them in the sea of Ebay. If you've got a vintage trade in store nearby they might buy them off you; there's one in London called VinMag that buys and sells old magazines, knitting and sewing patterns. I've no idea how much they pay, but they were selling intact Vogue patterns from the early 70s for 15. The Vogue patterns tend to be the most expensive.

madlilnerd
Jan 4, 2009

a bush with baggage

Artistic Monkey posted:

Not really a sewing question directly, but how do you guys store all of your stuff? Shelves for fabric? Drawers? I'm drowning in my various craft bullshit and trying to figure out the best way to contain it. Especially since I only have one room in the house for myself (bedroom+sewing room+computer desk).

Big pieces of fabric go in a large plastic box under the bed. Recycled/murdered clothes and usable scraps go in a huge wooden chest at the end of my bed. Beads, buttons and zips are all sorted in a little compartment box which then goes in with the uncut fabric along with some patterns. Thread, seam rippers, bobbins and chalk live in my pale blue polka dot sewing box and my pins are embedded in a toy my mum got me from Ikea and just live on my desk. The sewing machine when not in use gets covered and lives under my desk.

The problem I have is more with yarn competing with fabric for space. My uncut box is also getting pretty full, which probably means I should get round to making myself a dress or something.

madlilnerd
Jan 4, 2009

a bush with baggage

vaginadeathgrip posted:

Well, I spent the last year+ of my life working on my senior project (among other things) and the result here is 42% blood, 3% sweat, and 45% tears. I mentioned earlier in the thread that I did costume design for Alice in Wonderland (before I knew of that Tim Burton travesty :argh:) with sort of a 1930's flair. Anyway here are shots from the fashion show:


My Alice.

This is simply beautiful and I especially love the style of sleeve.
Honestly, if I still had an office job, I would wear that to work.

madlilnerd
Jan 4, 2009

a bush with baggage

My best friend's sister has been in and out of hospital a lot lately, so her mum commissioned me to make her a quilt as a surprise late birthday/get well soon present.


Click here for the full 1679x1318 image.


I love it so much even though there's a mistake in it (middle row, first column).

They asked for a Moulin Rouge quote for her label:


The birthday girl was over the moon with it and sent me a really lovely thank you card :3: It was pretty fun to make, but I don't know if I'll ever do a commission again because it made me so anal about cutting accuracy. I'd rather stick with doing it slapdash and having more fun!

madlilnerd
Jan 4, 2009

a bush with baggage

teknicolor posted:

IT Crowd in the background, nice! (oh and also zomg that quilt is awesome)

Of the 2 near identical pics I took, I deliberately chose that one to see if anyone would notice him in the background! 10 points to you.

My favourite thing about the quilt: it shares a couple of fabrics with one I made for my best friend last year, so it's like their quilts are sisters too :allears:
I'm clearly just a schmaltzy old lady, trapped in the body of a 20 year old girl.


On a completely unrelated note- is there anything I need to worry about when sewing very shiny, slippery satin? Should I put a new needle in? It hasn't been very long since I changed the last one.

madlilnerd
Jan 4, 2009

a bush with baggage

nolen posted:

I'm considering opening a sewing/fabric store within the next year (because Austin is severely lacking in good ones) and I'm curious what everyone in this thread would like to see in a sewing/fabric store.

Most stores seem to cater to the little old lady crowd and I'd like to change that up a bit and try to spark interest in the younger adult crowd. Any suggestions?

A scraps corner where you pay $5 to fill up a bag or box with scraps from a bin full of offcuts. Whenever I want to do patchwork I either have to raid my scraps box at home or buy whole lengths of fabric or buy those expensive jelly-roll packs and it's a pain.
Also a section with cheapy stuff, like polycotton that's $3 a metre. Beginners need scope to make mistakes and you can't do that if you've just paid 40 for enough Cath Kidstone cotton to make a skirt.

I think friendly and knowledgeable staff are the most important thing in a fabric store. Staff who ask you if you need help, but won't hassle you if you're having a good browse and are knowledgeable but not stuck up or patronising.

If you got a shop that had a window display, that would be cool. You could do a different look every month that was similar to a designer/high end look and show how much cheaper it was and how long it took to make, along with which fabric, pattern and notions from your store you used. Show people that they can make something that doesn't look home-made.

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madlilnerd
Jan 4, 2009

a bush with baggage

Wedemeyer posted:

Christmas is coming and I really want to make my sister some awesome Ruby Slippers. I haven't sewn in ages, though, so I hope someone with an expert eye can help me out!

I want to sew sequins onto this shoe:

Do you think it would be too thick/difficult? I'd glue gun it, but I'm afraid the glue might not stick to a fuzzy surface. Maybe a combo of glue gun and sewing would work?

Glue might work, but it would probably seep between the sequins and look awful. Your best bet would be to buy stringed sequins (instead of loose/single ones) and coil them around the shoe, hand sewing them in place. This will be much easier if the fabric on the shoe isn't glued to the shoe-form but is loose so you can sew just through the fabric and not the whole shoe.

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