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Dr. Kloctopussy
Apr 22, 2003

"It's time....to DIE!"


Some stuff I made lately...







also...



both were fun to make but holy moly do I have a long way to go!

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Dr. Kloctopussy
Apr 22, 2003

"It's time....to DIE!"


Micomicona posted:

Oh my gosh, that is awesome! its like an ocean warrior priestess dress!!!

Hey thanks! The concept was the sirens so that's pretty spot on. Nice to see my intent gets through!

Dr. Kloctopussy
Apr 22, 2003

"It's time....to DIE!"


Goldaline posted:

I'm learning to take pictures! So I actually have some non-pathetic shots of things to share.


I want to wear this stuff all the time. And fly a blimp.

Dr. Kloctopussy
Apr 22, 2003

"It's time....to DIE!"


stars posted:

Also any sewing tips for another cute outfit for a chubby 6th grader (she still needs a dressy outfit for the show) would be great...I am thinking a lot of A-lines.

What kind of chubby? I think that by 6th grade body type is starting to show. If she's developing breasts but has tummy and hips, a boned top with a full skirt could be good. I found a red strapless evening gown with a full skirt at a goodwill when I was 13 that made me look amazing (and I'm kind of pear-shaped actually). A-lines are the go-to, but can look matronly and "I'm hiding the fat" if you know what I mean.

Also, that sweatshirt looks like the bane of chubby insecure 6th graders to me. I remember I had this polka dot t-shirt....forever known as the polka-dot cow shirt. Loose-fitting bold patterns make chubby girls cry.

editing to add: maybe check out pics of Kelly Clarkson for flattering styles :)

Dr. Kloctopussy fucked around with this message at 06:13 on Feb 20, 2010

Dr. Kloctopussy
Apr 22, 2003

"It's time....to DIE!"


When I was a kid, my mom bought this stuff--it was like a roll of metallic paper, but it was heat-transferable (iron-on). So we could cut shapes out of it and make cool t-shirts.

Does anyone know what this is called/if it still exists?

Dr. Kloctopussy
Apr 22, 2003

"It's time....to DIE!"


SuzieMcAwesome posted:

I know how to use the machine. I have made simple things. I have made pillows, curtains, a pyrex casserole cover/carrier. I have just never made an article of clothing

Most pattern brands have a "beginners" line, e.g. Very Easy Vogue (though vogue has a reputation for being tougher than other brands?). Just pick one out that seems alright. You might end up making a couple things that you don't really love, but no biggie. Maybe try to pick ones that teach you a new skill each time (button holes, zippers, facings, bias bindings, etc.)

Do you have a general sewing book? I have a Reader's Digest book that covers fastenings in way more detail than most patterns and it's a handy reference.

edit: haha, just looked at Simplicity's and Butterick's easy lines and a lot of it is awful, but there are a few basic pieces in there that could get you started.

Dr. Kloctopussy fucked around with this message at 04:22 on Oct 18, 2012

Dr. Kloctopussy
Apr 22, 2003

"It's time....to DIE!"


this catte posted:

So, in finally scaling things up and attempting a larger practice project with poly fleece, I've discovered that keeping edges pinned nicely on stretchy fabric is actually kind of a challenge. Does anyone have any tips for a good way to keep, say, 3 layers of poly fleece all lined up neat and nice? The pins I used slipped just enough as I was sewing to slide the middle layer sideways a bit and mess the whole join up. :saddowns: With how thick and fluffy and stretchy it is, it is really tough to keep a stable stacked edge as I work, or maybe I'm just missing something really obvious.

Take the time to baste it, maybe?

Dr. Kloctopussy
Apr 22, 2003

"It's time....to DIE!"


Spent 30 minutes threading this beast last night--thanks a lot misprint in the manual! But now it will seam and finish simultaneously. Is this heaven? Perhaps.

Unfortunately, my design has some internal corners, so this might not work out quite like I planned. Thank god for muslins.

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Dr. Kloctopussy fucked around with this message at 18:42 on Oct 18, 2012

Dr. Kloctopussy
Apr 22, 2003

"It's time....to DIE!"


nolen posted:

Serging an internal curve isn't too bad as long as you straighten out the curve before you run it through the machine.

This video kinda explains what I'm talking about but is a bit hard to see what she's doing:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ioKrV7EnTAo

Yeah, curves I can handle, corners not so much. The more I think about it, the more I think I need to sew and finish them separately. Which means rethreading the machine of course!



I actually think the back panels and pleats may have been a poor design decision anyway. Maybe I'll redraft a plain back.

Bonus (?): These are some tiny meat pillows that I made for my studio space's "open studio" night. Because making people who came to see art contemplate meat pillows is hilarious.

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Dr. Kloctopussy fucked around with this message at 19:48 on Oct 18, 2012

Dr. Kloctopussy
Apr 22, 2003

"It's time....to DIE!"


They're actually silk gauze over silk charmeuse, but that's just because I'm obsessed with silk. First I dyed the charmeuse, then I washed the gauze with some of it, because I wanted it a light pink. It turned basically the same color as the charmeuse (oops). So them I threw some bleach on it, which fixed the color and distressed it severely. Thank god that worked perfectly for this project, because I hadn't thought of it at all. Charmeuse was then heat-bonded to raw silk for structure (and to form the solid fat borders in my original project--meat dress). Destroyed gauze was arranged on top and heat-bonded down (this gets your iron kinda messy). Et voila, meat.

We are having another open studio next weekend, so I might slap a $5/each sign next to them and see if anyone will take them home.

Dr. Kloctopussy fucked around with this message at 17:52 on Oct 19, 2012

Dr. Kloctopussy
Apr 22, 2003

"It's time....to DIE!"


Mizufusion posted:

Fuzzy pajama pants? That's what I want right now.

I was working on some capris, but I think the project is in hibernation forever now, and not just because the weather is getting colder. I had a really cute pattern, but attaching the waistband was driving me mad. The waist of the pants needs to be gathered ever-so-slightly, 1 5/8" in the back, and 5/8" in the front. Seems kind of stupid to me, and I'd probably have skipped the pattern if I noticed that sooner.

The fabric I was using was an indigo blue cotton, sort of like thin denim. A friend of mine destashed some fabric on me a while ago, and there was just enough of it for this pattern, so I figured they'd be like cute little jeans. Then I realized I was essentially making ladies jorts. :stonk:

You could convert the gathers into darts if that makes it better. I actually own a pair of medium denim clam-diggers and when I think about it, they make me feel remarkably "unfashionable mom"-ish. :(

Dr. Kloctopussy
Apr 22, 2003

"It's time....to DIE!"


Mizufusion posted:

Yeah, I think I'll try that. I was excited about them at first because the pattern was cheap, the fabric was free, and I don't have many pants that fit. They've been sitting on a chair in my kitchen untouched for over a week now. :sigh:

E: I just remembered the pants already have darts in the back. Why the gently caress are there darts and gathering on the same edge? There's only an inch of fabric that needs to be gathered in back, too. :mad:

Move the fullness from the gathers into the dart or just ease the whole seam?

Dr. Kloctopussy
Apr 22, 2003

"It's time....to DIE!"


Can anybody recommend a good book (or books) about sewing knits/serging?

I've got a 5 needle serger collecting way too much dust. Textbooks or mass market both acceptable. I'm interested in both pattern selection/alteration/creation and sewing techniques.

Dr. Kloctopussy
Apr 22, 2003

"It's time....to DIE!"


Does anyone own/have experience with knitting machines?

I've seen the cheap ones in craft stores, but they seem gimmicky. But maybe there are nice ones? What can you do with them? Anything beyond making custom sweater-knit fabrics? Worth it? Model recommendations?

Dr. Kloctopussy
Apr 22, 2003

"It's time....to DIE!"


Anne Whateley posted:

We have a knitting thread, and there tends to be some crossover between handknitting and machine knitting, so it's worth asking there. The cheap ones are definitely cheap and not worth it imo. The nicest ones allow for much more control, obviously, but there are still a bunch of handknitting techniques that I don't think they're able to do that would be important for a nice garment. If your goal is to crank out scarves, sure. If you want to make really custom-fitted sweaters, I think you'll still have to take shortcuts that would make it not worthwhile to me.

Awesome, I'll a ask in there eventually. I definitely don't need a scarf maker, and probably not even a custom-knit-fabric maker.

Here is a shirt I made a bit ago. First thing sewn entirely on the serger!

Dr. Kloctopussy
Apr 22, 2003

"It's time....to DIE!"


Pin it to a refrigerator box?

Dr. Kloctopussy
Apr 22, 2003

"It's time....to DIE!"


ReelBigLizard posted:

Finally a project started and finished. My aunt ordered a bunch of herringbone wool for making little Children's duffel coats but decided it was too dark and the herringbone too much of a fiddle to be matching up. I decided to try my hand at a flatcap.





I developed the pattern myself taking some basic pointers and dimensions from a couple of commercial hats I own. I have an Olney that I wear a lot but I always wished it had just a little more peak to help block the sun when I'm cycling or walking in the mornings / evenings. Probably took me a couple of days to develop the pattern and then an evening to put it together. Would go faster if I did another one now, there are a couple of elements of the construction I would approach differently and I've got some modifications to make to the pattern which will make things easier.

Daaaaaaamn, that is nice. Looks super professional.

Dr. Kloctopussy
Apr 22, 2003

"It's time....to DIE!"


Comrade Quack posted:

I got asked to make some kind of sentimental gift using a child's shirt. I can't think of anything to do when you have to take the arm and neck hole in to account.



1) Can you politely refuse? (serious answer)

2) Trim more closely around the design and appliqué it to something else (woven), rather than trying to cut it into a square-ish shape and use it as the base.

Dr. Kloctopussy
Apr 22, 2003

"It's time....to DIE!"


RandomPauI posted:

I want to be able to repair my clothes, hem them, sew patches on, etc. But I'm not inclined to hand sew because my hands tremble too much. And I don't anticipate using one more than a few times a year for any purpose at all.

Does it make sense to buy anything more than one of those cheap handheld machines? Does it even make sense to buy a machine?

You're going to be better off just hand sewing. Like mentioned above, the handheld machine will not fix trembling hands, and is likely to actually be worse--pulling a needle back because you jabbed the wrong place is trivial compared to having to rip out inches of crooked machine seams because your hands shook and got the machine and fabric misaligned.

Personally, I wouldn't buy a machine if I was only planning on mending things a few times a year.

Being able to hem your own pants SOUNDS great, and when it makes sense to do so, hemming will be faster with a machine. But you won't be able to hem jeans at all, and dress pants are typically hemmed with an invisible stitch that I doubt would be available on one of the handheld things, or by hand. So with the handheld, you would only maybe be able to nicely hem light-weight casual pants. Even with a decent machine, getting a nice hem on a pair of jeans is probably not going to happen.

Sewing on patches is likely to be impossible with a machine at least half the time. Getting a machine to the knee of jeans or the elbow of a jacket is.... Impossible with many machines (including the handheld ones).

Other common mendings, such as fixing ripped linings and replacing or reinforcing buttons/other fasteners also can't really be done with a machine.

Dr. Kloctopussy
Apr 22, 2003

"It's time....to DIE!"


I love the Celestial underwear so much.

And those wrestling unitards! ...I see these and think "maybe I COULD make my own bike jerseys," and then look at my sewing history and get realistic again.

Dr. Kloctopussy
Apr 22, 2003

"It's time....to DIE!"




I made these robes and sashes for a friend's art festival performance, and now somehow I'm in charge of costumes for an entire play.

Send help.

Dr. Kloctopussy
Apr 22, 2003

"It's time....to DIE!"


Bees on Wheat posted:

Send them an invoice. :j:


E: Only sort of kidding. I had a rant about people taking advantage of anyone that can sew/knit/draw/etc. but I'm going to assume you like these people enough to actually do the work, instead of telling them to pound sand.

Haha, right?! But in this case, I've actually been asking if I could help him with costumes for like 9 months. I just didn't expect "helping" to mean "Hey, you're the costume designer now!" I'm excited about it, but also very much "oh god wtf am I doing?"

Hutla posted:

Buy thrift and alter. Don't build anything that you don't absolutely have to.
Measure everyone yourself, actors lie about their measurements.
Use the plainest, most common shoes you can, having to buy footwear will suck up your entire budget in no time.

Thank you for this advice! If you have more, I would love it.

"Shop don't sew" is my mantra right now....yet I keep making designs I'd need to sew.

(Dunno if this is veering towards off topic for the sewing thread, but it's not really cosplay, so?)

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Dr. Kloctopussy
Apr 22, 2003

"It's time....to DIE!"


It's a ribald farce, technically set in the 1950s, but 99% of the action is a "live radio play" set in Nazi-Occupied Holland. Luckily for a "My First Costuming Gig," the characters are pretty straightforward/exaggerated, and I don't need to figure out how to express "kind" in a costume.

It seems like so far I'm doing everything acceptably, hooray! Storefront theatre is absolutely right (though back of a bar, in this case). I've talked to the director and traded some ideas/reference images with her, so I think we're on the same page. Discovered she does NOT think having Nazis take off their jackets to reveal 90s windbreakers is a good idea. I'm sending the "please look in your closets" lists next week, and have time set aside at rehearsals the week after to go through the results. I also have lots of spreadsheets for who is in what scene, what costume they are wearing, on-stage changes, quick changes, what I think is required for each costume so far, whether or not we have it, and how much it will cost to buy on Amazon if I can't figure out anything cheaper.

I have a color scheme in my head, but I want to convey it to her w/out drawing the actual costumes yet, so I'm thinking a kind of abstract collection of color swatches?

My biggest current challenges (other than budget lol) are:

* 2 Nazi Uniforms and 1 US pilot uniform...All WWII uniforms look basically the same to my inexperienced eyes, and I don't think anyone has one hiding in their closet or that I'll have much luck thrifting. Please god let the guys own black boots, at least. We have a military surplus store here, and Dickies have relatively inexpensive shirts and pants that are the same color, so might be doing that. Thank god you can put an arm band on nearly anything and everyone will recognize a Nazi. You could probably make a watermelon a Nazi that way.

* Need a sexy-housewife vintage-comics Dutch super-heroine, wearing the colors of the Dutch flag (i.e. Red, White, and Blue). I have a sailor-themed one sketched out, but want to present a couple concepts. I'm thinking "50s Lingerie + cape" is another option.

* Need a Dutch milk maid and 50s housewife who are "thematically related," wearing red and gold (they are advertising "mascots") -- I did buy fabric for these, but it's returnable if I can figure something else out (possibly sticking gold flowers onto a red dress or something). If I sew them, it's going to be like...elastic-backed circle skirt with a belt and blouse, b/c hell no am I sewing a 50s dress from scratch.

* Need to add a few items (hat and coat, I think) to "transform" above housewife into a Nazi-boss, and then all those things need to "blow" off of her during a fight.

The play doesn't run until late September, so hopefully I have enough time to mess everything up once or twice and still have no huge disasters.

Thank you especially for the advice about getting interactive clothes (PROPS!) to the actors early, because there are several things like that and I can prioritize them.

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