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Cuddlebottom
Feb 17, 2004

Butt dance.

Does anyone know a relatively invisible way to reinforce embroidery to make it more durable? I put a cross stitch pattern on a white apron, but I'm worried that all the little thread ends will get yanked out in a week. Should I just coat the back stitches with fray glue, or maybe iron on interfacing?

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Cuddlebottom
Feb 17, 2004

Butt dance.

discordiaskitten posted:

I usually put interfacing on my daughter's clothes and as she's three they get a fair bit of wear. It holds up quite well but again, it's one to check on frequently as the edges can start curling up after a while. Thb I've had shop-bought embroidered clothes lose their interfacing far faster so I don't think it's what I'm using that's the problem, just that interfacing gets battered after a while.
Thanks :) Ended up taking both pieces of advice - so I used a bunch of anti-fray glue and put on a light piece of interfacing. It seems to be pretty solid.

Cuddlebottom
Feb 17, 2004

Butt dance.

I have something to add to the embroidery questions from the last page - what does everyone here use for transfers (if anything?) I tried that tracing paper, but it rubbed off if you looked at it funny. Rinse-out marker was OK, but bled for fine lines.

Edit: And thanks for that clipart page - it has some really great images.

Cuddlebottom fucked around with this message at 17:43 on Mar 15, 2009

Cuddlebottom
Feb 17, 2004

Butt dance.

I have a question for the handful of fashion students in this thread - are there any resources, courses, websites, books, whatever available for shoe-making? I've been doing research off and on and it seems to be the first craft in the history of the internet without good comprehensive information. There's a bit on the general idea (covering your last, drawing the pattern, cutting/sewing the upper) but it all sort of breaks down at the actual complex parts, namely things like attaching soles or creating heeled shoes. Originally I thought it would be a really fun craft to learn (and practical), but now I'm researching it more out of stubbornness. I know people have to learn this stuff somewhere - who else designs prototype and sample shoes? - and I'm at a total loss, unless the only way is to attend one of those $1,000 workshops run by people with horrendous websites. No luck looking at the local art college, either.

Cuddlebottom fucked around with this message at 18:44 on Jul 7, 2009

Cuddlebottom
Feb 17, 2004

Butt dance.

I'm working on sewing a pair of men's gloves (using information mostly from http://www.vintagesewing.info/1950s/50-hmg/hmg-toc.html), but I'm not sure what do pick for fabric once I have a working pattern. I imagine the best option would be leather, but while I can sew decently, I've heard leather is a nightmare and should be avoided unless you're more of an expert. What other nice fabrics could I use for a project like this - maybe something weather proof? :confused: Or should I suck it up and buy some leather?

Cuddlebottom
Feb 17, 2004

Butt dance.

4R7 THi3F posted:

leather isn't that hard to sew, you just need to make sure you have a leather needle in your machine and a teflon foot
I'm working by hand since it's going to be so small and fiddly; will I need to pick up a special needle for that?

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Cuddlebottom
Feb 17, 2004

Butt dance.

DawntoDust posted:

There's actually "glover's needles" which are handy cause they have long thread loops so you can use sinew or waxed leather-working thread for making the gloves look old and hand-made in a good way. Tandy's Leather Company (if there's one nearby you) sells little packs with like 5 different hand-sewing needles, plus like everything else for leather-working you can imagine.

If you're just going to do regular nylon/whatever thread by hand, all you need is the sharpest needle you've got, and a willingness to sacrifice it to the leather.

Good luck.
Thank you for the good suggestion - I'll try and hunt down a Danby's... If this weird custom glove pattern system works, I'll post it. :)

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