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nolen
Apr 4, 2004

butts.


I'm currently working on my very first sewing project. EVER.

I taught myself how to backstitch and then created a pattern for a stuffed animal. Everything seems to be on track and I will hopefully finish the doll today, but there is one thing that's scaring me.

While sewing the pieces together, the doll has been inside-out. I have left a hole so that I can flip the doll rightside-out and stuff it when I'm ready. Now, how do I sew up the hole from the outside without making it look different compared to the other stitches?

Basically, how do I finish up the doll from the outside?

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nolen
Apr 4, 2004

butts.


Bagleworm posted:

Here's a site for finishing stuffed animals, and if that's still confusing, here's a video showing a slip stitch on a hem.

You basically turn the stuffed thing right side out, and then fold the seam allowances back inside the turning-hole so that everything is properly lined up like you want the finished look to be. Then you stitch the two seam allowances to each other right at the edge of the seam by sticking the needle in the hole to get the thread through them, like zipping something up from the inside.
At the very end you'll have to knot it off, but usually you can find a way to hide the knot.
I hope that clears it up, it's hard to describe things like this with words.

This is perfect and exactly what I was looking to learn. Thank you!

I can't wait to try it out when I get home and I'll post the finished product tonight hopefully.

nolen
Apr 4, 2004

butts.


My very first sewing experience. I made the pattern from scratch while bored at work and I think he turned out pretty good for a first try!

Here he is, saluting for a job well done:


and here he is being saucy:


Thanks again to Bagelworm for the help!

nolen
Apr 4, 2004

butts.


madlilnerd posted:

Are you kidding me? For a first time sewing project from a pattern you designed yourself, he is nothing short of fantastic. I wish to pass a motion that he has his own pair of glasses so he doesn't have to use yours.

Buuut, some people, eg my mum who just looked over my shoulder, think that visible/contrasting stitches look scruffy, so maybe next time use matching thread?

Oh yeah, I completely agree about the contrasting thread. I went with black because I was afraid of not seeing the stitches as I went along. Next time won't be nearly as scary.

Thanks for the compliments everyone! I think I've found a new hobby.

nolen
Apr 4, 2004

butts.


I finished my second-ever sewing project.



It's an owl pillow for the lady, who conveniently LOVES owls. I can't wait to surprise her with it tomorrow.


After hand stitching two projects now, I think I'm going to invest in a machine. It definitely would have made this guy go much much much faster.

nolen
Apr 4, 2004

butts.


Relativistic posted:

Does anyone know the best place the get fabric fur in various colors online? I need to make a stuffed penguin and a frog. I was going to mostly wing it by making a lot of mock-ups, but if anyone knows of any good resources about drafting your own stuffed animal patterns, that would be great, too.

I made my patterns for the squid (posted on the last page) and the owl (posted above) out on paper first and faux-assembled the paper cutouts to get a rough idea of the shape. The squid is only made from three pieces.

Any papercraft websites could give you some starting places though, depending on the complexity.

nolen
Apr 4, 2004

butts.


CutiePie posted:

Well, they didn't list down reverse stitch in the specifications.

And Antis0ciald0rk told me that the machine I chose is crap. I have been interested in getting an antique singer but I'm worried about having to fix it up. I don't sew, how would I know that there's something wrong with the machine. And I think having the manual would help me a lot.

Should I just increase my budget for the sewing machine?

Search craigslist, thrift stores, and antique shops. Hell, even ask a relative if they have an old machine they wouldn't mind offloading.

I asked my grandmother and she came back with three Singers. One from the 70's, 50's, and 30's. I took the Featherweight 221 off her hands and had a local repair shop give it a once-over.

Failing that, ask your friends or friends of your parents. It can't hurt.

nolen
Apr 4, 2004

butts.


Ashcans posted:

I've never actually made my own patterns, at most I've modified existing ones or switched around bits between similar patterns. I did make a sleeveless tailcoat for my Halloween costume (which was sort of a grasshopper. I wish I had a decent picture of the whole getup) but I'd like to take another swing at the real thing. Do you have any recommendation on a good book for patternmaking? A lot of people in the thread seem to be actual professionals or seriously training, but I'm just a guy with an old sewing machine.

I'm just a guy with an old sewing machine too but all the things I've made were from self-created patterns.

For my stuffed animals, I just sketch everything out on paper and then cut it out, glue it up papercraft style, and look for areas that need improvement.

As for clothing, I look at how my current clothes are sewn together and build off of that. Measure, measure, measure. Draw pattern, cut pattern, try pattern out on test fabric. Prototypes tell me what needs correction.


I'm sure there's a better way to learn, but this seems to be the most-rewarding for me.

nolen
Apr 4, 2004

butts.


So I have to provide a gift geared toward an adult male for a gift exchange.

Any ideas of any sewing projects I can whip up for an guy who could be anywhere from 6' 0" to 6' 3" and 145lbs to 220lbs?

nolen
Apr 4, 2004

butts.


I have a question for the sewing pros in this thread (that means anyone who has any knowledge of sewing machines whatsoever).


Over the holidays, I inherited my grandmother's sewing machine. It's in phenomenal condition, considering its age, and came with all sorts of feet/attachments/things.

What in the hell are all these feet for? Excuse the low quality camera phone pictures, but it's all I have at the moment.


The machine in question. An Elna Automatic:


A few of the feet:


More feet. The one in the middle has a spring inside of it:


I just found this little bastard as I was putting away the other feet:


What the gently caress is this thing?:


These were with said "thing":



The manual is still with the machine but unfortunately it doesn't explain much about the additional feet.

nolen
Apr 4, 2004

butts.


Wow. Thanks for the answers everyone! Now that I know what each foot is for, I can research HOW to use them on my own.


And yes, the cabinet came with the machine as well. It has the machine fold down into it so that it looks like a little table when not in use and has drawers to store most of the attachments/cams/etc.


Another question: Would I be able to experiment with making jeans with this type of machine? I recently made a hoodie for the girlfriend with this machine and had some troubles getting through a few layers of material. Is it possible that I just wasn't using the right kind of foot/needle combination for the material, or is this type of machine not powerful enough to such things normally?

Again, thanks to everyone for the help. You guys/gals are fantastic.

nolen
Apr 4, 2004

butts.


Is there a highly-recommended computerized embroidery machine? I just want something that will sew the designs I create using whatever software is required.

What's the ballpark dollar amount I'd be looking at for such a machine?

nolen
Apr 4, 2004

butts.


Cross_ posted:

Hello there fellow male sewer :hfive: !

I prefer the term "seamster" :v:.

edit: okay how about "tailor"?

nolen fucked around with this message at 03:01 on Mar 11, 2010

nolen
Apr 4, 2004

butts.


Cross_ posted:

Does anyone here know of software to turn 3d models into 2d patterns ?
So far my google skills have only revealed

Plushie- which is buggy and not actively maintained:
http://www.den.rcast.u-tokyo.ac.jp/~yuki/plushie/index-e.html

PatternImage- which looks awesome but costs $5000 :aaa:
http://www.livesforce.com/PatternImage.html

I didn't know this software was even an option in pattern-making.

You just made my life a thousand times simpler. Thanks!

nolen
Apr 4, 2004

butts.


Cross_ posted:

I did ? I just pointed out two options that aren't really viable. :confused:

PatternImage and EasyToy are exactly what I've apparently been looking for to speed up the workflow of my stuffed animal business.

nolen
Apr 4, 2004

butts.


ludosti posted:

If you strike out online, you could take pics and post them here. I'll bet we'd be able to identify them all for you.

I did this for an old Elna machine I inherited from my grandmother (posted a few pages back) and everyone here was very helpful with the answers. You might even have similar feet to the ones I posted.

nolen
Apr 4, 2004

butts.


Nexus-6 posted:

I'm hoping you guys can offer some advice. I'm looking to buy a sewing machine, but I don't need it to do anything mega fancy; I'll mostly be using it to mend stuff.

I definitely know how to sew, I was a costume design major in college, so I don't need a machine for n00bs, but I no longer have access to the 1980s metal Singer tank that was my mother's, as I moved to another state.
In looking at new machines online, it seems like everything is really plasticy and digital. Should I get a new machine? Hunt for an old one?

I'm hoping to spend around a hundred bucks, is that unrealistic?


Based on your desire for a metal machine and your price range, I'd recommend checking out the local thrift stores in your area. I have seen PLENTY of older Singers while out looking for fabric at thrift stores.

Check craigslist too!

nolen
Apr 4, 2004

butts.


The Young Marge posted:

OK, a co-worker gave me a huge box of vintage sewing patterns from her mother's attic. Here are a few gems:

(images)

As you can see, they're from the 50s through 80s. I'm pretty sad that they won't fit me - they're mostly pattern size 6-12, or for like a 30" to 34" bust (fits a current US size 0-4). WTF should I do with these? Think they're worth any money?

Bah, if only I wasn't such a modern cornfed gal. I need a lady tux and a Jackie O suit, dammit!

This is an incredible find and I'm always jealous that girls get all the good stuff. There are hardly any fun patterns for men.

nolen
Apr 4, 2004

butts.


CureMinorWounds posted:

So I've managed to lose the power cord to my sewing machine, and I've searched Janome's site and can't find anything even relating to my sewing machine. Is there such a thing as a universal sewing machine cord? Or am I getting my hopes up here?

I've found that most local dealers will be able to acquire stuff like this for you.

nolen
Apr 4, 2004

butts.


I'm considering opening a sewing/fabric store within the next year (because Austin is severely lacking in good ones) and I'm curious what everyone in this thread would like to see in a sewing/fabric store.

Most stores seem to cater to the little old lady crowd and I'd like to change that up a bit and try to spark interest in the younger adult crowd. Any suggestions?

nolen
Apr 4, 2004

butts.


Thanks for the suggestions so far everyone. Keep them coming!


Cross_, that's one of my concerns. This whole thing is just an idea and will still need a lot of business planning. I have no problem catering to a broader crowd, but I don't want the store to feel like only old ladies are welcome in the establishment (this is my main gripe with most fabric/sewing shops in Austin right now). Hitting both demographics would be tough.

madlilnerd, I LOVE the idea of a "all-you-can-eat" scrap section.

nolen
Apr 4, 2004

butts.


** Cross-posted from the Plush Monstrosities and Corgi threads, but I figured this thread would enjoy this too **

My friend's birthday was over the weekend and I made her a plush version of her dog. From design to completion was about a week, so I'm happy with it.



nolen
Apr 4, 2004

butts.


Shnooks posted:

AUGH That's so loving cute D: How did you come up with the pattern? I'm interested in making very, very large scale soft toys for my artwork and I'm just beginning to tackle figuring out my own patterns.

I had several reference photos of her dog (seriously, she takes pictures almost every day) that helped me create a 3D model using a free program called Sculptris. You could use any 3D modeling application but this is what I prefer, though I venture into another modeling program called EasyToy sometimes.

After that, I take the 3D model into a program called PatternImage. PatternImage is sold by a company called Livesforce, who also owns EasyToy. It's expensive software, too ($900 a year or $3k forever, though you get both applications for these prices). This software lets me draw seams along the 3D model and then unwrap them into a 2D pattern.

Last step is just printing it out and sewing it all up. When I get home I can show some in-progress shots of the software if there's enough interest. I've also heard of some people using Pepakura (a paper model pattern creation software) for its unwrapping. The patterns will be a bit more blocky but it's substantially cheaper and might at least get you off to a good start on your pattern.

nolen
Apr 4, 2004

butts.


Shnooks posted:

I was starting to look for 3D model programs, but because of time restraints I wasn't sure if I was going to be able to learn how to use it and make the pattern. I'm still in school so I have a semester to make as much poo poo as possible. My last review went badly because I had almost no work, so I can't have that happen again.

I looked at PepaKura too, but couldn't find any of what I was looking for.

Thanks for the advice though. I'll look around for those programs and all and see what I can do. Maybe the fashion dept computers have PatternImage on it that I can use.

So far I've been playing with making models out of plastic bags and paper, covering it with tape, covering it with saran wrap, re-taping it, then cutting up. I haven't sewed anything from it yet.


Sculptris is my go-to application because it's ridiculously easy to pick up. It's like digital modeling clay (similar to Z-Brush and MudBox if you're familiar) and exports to .OBJ, which most other 3D applications accept.

I would be very jealous if your school had copies of PatternImage installed. It's such a niche program that I've never even heard of anyone else using it outside of someone in this thread randomly stumbling upon it. No online tutorials outside of those provided by the company (who is based in China), and the documentation leaves much to be desired.

Most Fashion departments will use something like Wild Ginger or PatternMaker, which are geared more toward garment creation, but it's possible that they could prove useful.

Spend a few minutes playing with Sculptris if you get the chance, you might be a prodigy! http://www.sculptris.com/

nolen fucked around with this message at 00:53 on Jan 7, 2011

nolen
Apr 4, 2004

butts.


Cross_ posted:

Glad to hear that my PatternImage recommendation is working out for you.
When I was messing around with Pepakura I kept running into limitations due to high poly obj files. It really wants low poly meshes to begin with. It would be awesome if you could just take any OBJ, have Pepakura reduce it, spit out an image complete with textures and then send it off to Spoonflower for printing. No more pattern tracing !

Ah yes, it was you who found PatternImage! It's been pretty useful so far, though their copy protection scheme is annoying (dongle+tied to the system clock).

As far as polycount, you can throw an OBJ into most 3D programs and reduce the count using whatever tools they have available. Sculptris has a "Reduce Brush" that lets you paint over the model to reduce the number of polys used. I'm sure other programs have something similar, though you're probably onto something with Pepakura's limitations. I wish there were a cheaper version of PatternImage.

nolen
Apr 4, 2004

butts.


HardCoil posted:

You can do almost the same with the free version of peakura :)
http://www.tamasoft.co.jp/pepakura-en/

Oh totally. I mentioned Pepakura in the Plush Monstrosities thread I believe and someone else came in and mentioned that Pepakura is pretty strict about the number of polys/tris/verts/whatever. It apparently prefers really low-res models.

Also, and correct me if I'm wrong, you can only draw your seams on the actual edges of the 3D model in Pepakura. PatternImage will let you place your seams anywhere and then do the unwrapping with whatever other magic it has going on behind the scenes.

That doesn't mean it isn't worth a shot though! I'm sure it's a fantastic solution for anyone on a tight budget :).

nolen
Apr 4, 2004

butts.


I was sick of seeing no accurate Bubble Bobble plushes (seriously, google one. They are all terrible) so I made my own.




You can't tell from the photo but it's 2 feet tall and HUGE.

edit: Featured on Sprite Stitch :D http://www.spritestitch.com/?p=3283

nolen fucked around with this message at 22:30 on Feb 7, 2011

nolen
Apr 4, 2004

butts.


Comrade Quack posted:

What kind of fabric is that or where do you get your fabric? It seems like I can never find the exact shades and colors I want in a similar enough fabric.


Since moving to Austin, it's been slim pickings locally. They're both fleece: the green and white are leftover from when I lived in Phoenix and bought from a local place called SAS Fabrics and the pink is from a Joann's here in Austin.

The yellow fins and white for the finger/toenails, and black for the eyes are all felt and I think I bought those all from SAS as well. I have TONS of leftover fabric from previous projects, but felt is pretty easy to find in many colors.

nolen
Apr 4, 2004

butts.


Cross_ posted:

Are you planning on selling this or would you be willing to share your pattern?
My son's due date is in a month so I need to start stocking up on video game-related plushies :colbert:

A friend of mine back in Phoenix is throwing his 3rd annual Bubble Bobble rave (not even kidding) in March so I figured I would throw it up for raffle there. I might even make a giant Bob to go with it, but we'll see that goes.

I could make another one down the line though if the demand is great enough. Someday I'll start an proper etsy account.

nolen
Apr 4, 2004

butts.


Oops, I did it again.

nolen
Apr 4, 2004

butts.


Finally finished my first non-plush project in a long while.





I made everything from scratch, including the straps.

First time working with vinyl and it was not pleasant. Two broken needles, a do-over, and figuring out how to press a vinyl seam without destroying the thing.

nolen
Apr 4, 2004

butts.


Does anyone here own an embroidery machine or sewing machine with embroidery unit?

I'm looking for upgrade recommendations from my Pfaff Creative 2124 to something with an actual screen to help take away the guess work.

The Creative 4.0 is one sexy machine but the price makes me do a spit take. Same goes for any of the Baby Lock machines.

nolen
Apr 4, 2004

butts.


Vulvarine posted:

I read the thread, maybe I missed it, but what do y'all use for pattern paper? I need cheap options.

I actually use sheets of acetate, draw the pattern with a sharpie, then cut perforations along the pattern lines.

After that, it's just a point of placing the acetate pattern on my fabric and marking everywhere there's a hole in the pattern. I like to use painter's tape to hold the acetate to the fabric so it doesn't move while I mark.



Otherwise, giant newsprint sketchpads are great for cheap pattern paper if you want a more traditional route.

nolen
Apr 4, 2004

butts.


I have one of these in black: http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/50103086/ that is full of fabric. All my spools of thread are in a spool case that I received for Christmas and my notions, scissors, blades, etc. are in a super hip tackle box (I'm a boy, it's okay).

nolen
Apr 4, 2004

butts.


Brainbread posted:

And as for other men sewing, I think we all hang out in the stuffed animal sewing thread.

This is true. The anti-manly sewing crew.

nolen
Apr 4, 2004

butts.


Brainbread posted:

I'm not sure anyone is familiar with making mascot-esque costumes? I'm trying to figure out how to secure foam inserts for my project, and am not sure of where to go looking for a guide on the subject.

I'd take a safe bet that most furry websites would have information on this stuff. Just go in, get your stuff, and leave.

Don't look anyone in the eyes.

nolen
Apr 4, 2004

butts.


Rufus En Fuego posted:

Pretty much all sergers offer the same basic features (which are excellent for beginners), but where the Babylock truly stands out is the self-threading and overall stitch quality, not to mention ease of use. Puckering's pretty much a thing of the past, and the thing's built solid. I bought mine used ages ago and I still haven't needed to get it serviced (even though I should).

Their website has a lot of great information on the various models. http://www.babylock.com/sergers/

This. Buy used if you can, as they are fairly pricey (but for a good reason).

I loved my Babylock serger so much that I defected from Pfaff and bought a Babylock embroidery machine as well.

nolen
Apr 4, 2004

butts.


Miranda posted:

I have no idea where to post this - but my boyfriend's nephew has a lovie that is on the way to it's grave and we need a replacement! We lost the other two and they no longer make them. Can anyone suggest somewhere to commission it? It's made of minky and satin I think, I've already asked one etsy shop who i've bought lovies from before but no luck. I'd love to give the job to a goon though!

If you post a photo of what exactly you need made, I might have some time to tackle this job.

nolen
Apr 4, 2004

butts.


madlilnerd posted:

I don't sew a lot with jersey (t-shirt fabric) but I don't think straight stitch is the best for it, because it doesn't have any stretch. An old machine with straight stitch can still do lots, including making tailored shirts, taking up hems, altering trouser lengths, but I don't think it would be great for jersey.

Someone with more experience loving around making t-shirts, feel free to correct me.

Most stretchy fabrics like jersey do best on a serger/overlock machine/sewing machine with an overlock stitch.

Cheesy videos: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Onf2VvjuWIo
https://vimeo.com/8597316

nolen fucked around with this message at 02:43 on Jun 28, 2012

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nolen
Apr 4, 2004

butts.


fanpantstic posted:

I'm looking at getting a serger off craigslist, there are often some nice looking ones for <$100. I haven't used a serger since high school sewing class (10 years ago), so I don't really know what to look for as far as what might be wrong or right about it. Any ideas?

Make sure the blade is still intact and sharp/easy to sharpen. Ease of threading is something I would look for as well.

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