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RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga

Are there any more guy oriented pattern shops? All the denim at these places is 10oz stretchy garbage :( Do you know of any places to source high end denim from? Thanks

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RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga

Can anybody recommend fabric shops in NYC?

RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga

Are there aftermarket pedals you can by for Husky sewing machines? My moms machine seems to have about a centimeter difference between cautious detailing speed and lol imma eat your fingertips.

Also, from my extensive internet research I've found there's nothing girly about sewing a grenade pouch.

RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga

Should I be paying attention to the voltage or ampage rating of motors on sewing machines? I want to do heavy (14 oz) denim, would 110v, 1.5 amps do the trick? I have a 1 amp and it really just isn't enough.

Also, how much will using denim specific needles help?

RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga

Just got my denim needles, size 18. My machine is still arthritic and buzzy but it went through 6 layers of 11oz with a little help.

RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga








Edit:
All sewn on this


Kwik Sew 3504, slightly modified. Still debating putting a cinch and a patch on the back. I'm going to hold off doing something about the knee/thigh bulk until the denim (12 oz? Can't remember) settles a little.

RichBomb fucked around with this message at 05:12 on Jun 12, 2008

RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga

Thanks for the compliments everybody. This is my 4th sewing project, the first two being boxers and for the third I tore up some old 505's and used them for a patterns for jeans that didn't look that great. I'd have finished all the edges but my serger asploded half way through.

Squirelly poo- I ordered from this guy and they came like 3 days later, super easy to install, but I can't really recommend the oak button I used for my top button, it's not as sturdy as the others. For top stitching I used a seam guide foot, like this one. It was indispensable.


Leonard- I got it at a (kinda) local independent fabric store. Not selvedge, but when I machine washed the fabric to get the shrink out the exposed edges lost a fair amount of indigo, so there's a good chance that these will fade nicely. I'm thinking about getting an industrial machine and going Ande Whall for awhile.

I might take the hem up, even though I want some stacking, 35 inches is huge for me because I only wear 30 or so.


Edit: Just checked them out with the jeans rolled up inside, looks way better, new pics later in the week.

RichBomb fucked around with this message at 01:20 on Jun 9, 2008

RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga

Nione posted:

sewing machines
Just take it in for service and get a new pedal. New machines are by and large cheap plastic mehness. I sewed the jeans on the last page with a machine from the 1970's that was never sewed on, and the stitches are fairly good and the motor is stronger than most things you'll find today. Fix up what you have or go garage sale hunting this weekend (a search for "sewing" on craigslist should yield you a lot of those) and find a 5 stitch machine. No need to pay for another new inadequate piece of junk in the world when there are plenty of excellent and cheaper finds to be had.

RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga

Met with a patternmaker today, more jeans soon :woop:

RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga



vs.



sure to be an ugly battle, will post results soon.

RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga

It's a legitimate industrial so it came as a unit, table, motor and head. The motor uses a belt drive to spin the wheel on the head. The pedal is sensitive as hell, it goes from a soft purr that barely moves the dogs at all to NOM NOM NOM FEED ME SOME OF YO FINGERS in about 1/2 an inch. The stitches are beautiful and tight.

Just picked up my pattern, hopefully have a pair up by Tuesday.

RichBomb fucked around with this message at 04:33 on Aug 18, 2008

RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga

Third pair of jeans.












RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga

Respekt posted:

Seriously, you've convinced me to make my own pair of jeans. If I may ask, where did you get the selvedge denim from ? Is there a way to get Japanese selvedge ?
Don't bother with selvedge for your first pair, getting the outseam right will be the least of your worries. Just go to a fabric shop (independent if you have one, Joannes will have some denim if you can't find another store) and get the heaviest denim you can. I don't know about Japanese sourcing but I've never looked into it. I bought this selvedge from Top Textile in LA

RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga

squirrellypoo posted:


Also, the selvedge on selvedge jeans is just on the outseam? Colour me stupid, I've never seen any myself and thought it ran up both sides and the denim came off really narrow looms... Oops. In that case, all denim is selvedge, you just have to do the pattern layout right.
Just the outseam, selvedge denim fabric are around 30 inches with the finished selvedge seam on both ends. Not all denim is selvedge, the 60 inch bolts have a normal ugly unfinished selvages.


Sorry about the double post, typing with an iPod.

RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga

Not sure about the seamakers palm thing, google is showing a variety of fancy wrist strap thimbles? Anyways, for thread you're going to want something nylon and UV resistant, probably monster TEX 80 size or something

RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga

That is so freaking cool. I want to make a nice houndstooth button up when I get back to the states.

RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga

Just finished these.






RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga

That Ottoman kills it. I on the other hand, haven't been able to put the waistband on a pair of jeans I started like, a month ago

RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga

Excuse my spam, selling the last pair of jeans I posted.

http://www.etsy.com/view_listing.php?listing_id=21460117

RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga

Made these back in August, worn pretty much every other day with a few week long stints since then.





Pocket corner reinforcement

RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga

Finished these the other night







Boomtime.


But in the mean time I have a 7 by 7 airplane munitions box that I need to convert into a cutting and ironing table. I've been told that plywood with 1 - insul bright 2 - cotton batting (for extra padding) 3 - cotton twill will do me well for the ironing bit and just to get cutting mats for the other side. Any suggestions?

RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga

squirrellypoo posted:

If you're putting that much effort into making your own cutting/ironing table, you may want to consider going an extra few steps and make yourself a grain board (god it just took me 15 minutes of searching through my sewing blogs to find that post, guh).

And I love the worn-in look of the first pair of jeans, I can't believe how well the denim has aged. I've got a pair I made almost exactly a year ago out of super-thick Levis denim, wearing them 2-3 times a week all year, and they've barely worn at all. Do you wash and tumble dry them on high heat or something?

Seriously, it seems like everyone is sewing jeans right now, it must be the season for it (though I know you do all year round). I just finished another pair myself, with these really weird seamlines and a bit of the front wraps around all the way to the CB. I'll post photos in a few days when it's up on my site.
I've been wearing them every other day since I made them. The wear time has included some back packing in Europe and other hard wear too. I actually don't really wash them that much, they've had maybe 3 washes and I always hang dry.

Thanks for the tutorial, I'll post results soonish.

RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga

If you make it cool from scratch, you don't need to alter cool in :cool:

No really, altering is a pain in the butt, especially on guys clothes where there's so much chainstitching and flat felling.

RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga

Haaat! posted:

So I think I'd like to give actual clothing design a go, but I'm not able to study it in any kind of school setting. Can anyone who is either a professional or a student (or just informed) give me advice on books? I have a bit of a vague idea of what I want so far, but wouldn't mind a bit of guidance.

This one seems to be the most popular from a brief look around;

Patternmaking for Fashion Design by Joseph Helen Armstrong

But this one uses the metric system, hurray!

Metric Pattern Cutting for Womens Wear by Aldrich Winifred.

Can anyone who has used either of those give an opinion or suggest a better alternative?

http://www.fashion-incubator.com/archive/on_reviewing_pattern_books/

I have the one by Armstrong, but I haven't been able to get at it yet.

Anyways, new sewing studio on the way, currently building the cutting/ironing table. I bolted my industrial to the ground the otherday which was loving righteous.

RichBomb fucked around with this message at 01:10 on Apr 12, 2009

RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga

flippy posted:

I know you posted this a while back, but I am late to the party. You made those jeans as your *4th* sewing project? Did you have any other background? What learning material did you use?

I have been toying with the idea of getting into sewing, and the idea of making my own jeans appeals to me, but it looked really hard.

I have no background in sewing. I may or may not be an obsessive and neurotic maniac though. Before those I'd made two pairs of boxers and one other pair of jeans. Jeans are hard, I won't pretend they aren't, but it's only fabric and thread, totally doable.

I'm actually wearing the first pair I made right now, they're my work jeans now and I was working on my studio today.

Here are some horrid pictures of my studio thus far. It looks dingy and gross (it kind of is) but these things just become sexy using a 50mm lens, and so on, so no worries.

Left to right, my Singer, my work table and then my storage boxes. In the back right I want to put in a fabric rack, and a footpress for buttons and rivets somewhere.


The table is an old ammunition box from WWII. The side facing the machine will be for ironing, the ply wood will be for marking out patterns/cutting. The home machines might migrate but they seem ok right there. (I really need an industrial serger/safety stitch, that little overlocker is a POS)


These used to hold 50 caliber anti aircraft rounds. Now they hold my tools, the sewing machines, spray paint and frisbees.


This is where the ironing board I'm trying to build should go. I'm kind of too proud of the little ruler and mallet holster I stapled to the box though.


Here's the materials for said board. The mesh gives too much when stapled to the frame, so I'm not sure what to do other than get heavier mesh or look for a metal grate on the cheap.


For the cutting board I've just got some plywood with 1/4 rubber grommets underneath. I'm looking for some cutting mats or battleship linoleum to put on top.


And this side will soon have a futon, computers, clothing rack etc for livability.


It also looks like I'm set to work with a professional patternmaker on my final pattern/grading so I'll be ready to take orders for all sizes soon. Then I'll branch out to skinny and full/vintage cut. This sewing studio is just an experiment though, I have the luxury to screw around until June 1st. Hopefully I'll have a paid internship with the Travel Chanel for the summer, but that would take me away from this and it's starting to get really exciting.

RichBomb fucked around with this message at 15:29 on May 7, 2009

RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga

meche posted:

Sewn by me, quilted professionally.
What's the difference here?

RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga

That's sweet, how old is your daughter?



Courtesy of the Salvation Army, $27



It's a Singer 66-16, and it's wonderful. The wiring is hosed but from spinning the wheel I can tell it's going to sew very well.

I also bought a gravity fed industrial iron today. The difference between an industrial iron and a home iron isn't as awesome as industrial/domestic sewing machine, but it's still great.

RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga

I can't speak to opportunities for costume shop seamstresses but if you're talking to educators you want to train sewing skills like a "sample maker," not a seamstress. Sample makers have the best sewing skills in the industry, they take the patterns from the pattern maker, do up a sample exactly according to the details given from the customer (this is to test the pattern and let the customer change specs before production). As far as I know there are no training tracks to becoming a sample maker other than being the best production line seamstress at a factory for a long time. IOW, not very much fun. I don't think learning the nitty gritty manufacturing end of a dying domestic industry is what you want.

Long story short, the best thing you can do to get answers quickly is start networking with heads of costume/bridal shops and ask what's up. You'll probably need to apprentice for a while.

RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga

Ozma posted:

denim needle

I don't think this is your best choice. If the tip gets the least bit snaggy it'll screw up your whole operation. Try ball point needles?

Not an Anthem posted:

Rich those jeans are fantastic, you thinking of doing any other denim work?

Goldaline your experiments are always really cool, like the french military sweaterpants

Hmm, shirts maybe one day, I've never really made any so I don't know. My graded pattern should be here in 2 weeks, and hopefully I'll have a rivet press in by then to really start doing some damage. I'm going to get a bunch of fabric options for the jeans (denim, canvas, duck), and get a few more styles figured out. I really want to learn how to make vests though.

RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga

RichBomb posted:

Courtesy of the Salvation Army, $27



It's a Singer 66-16, and it's wonderful. The wiring is hosed but from spinning the wheel I can tell it's going to sew very well.

There's another one of these at the same Salvation Army, on Erie Blvd in Syracuse, New York if anybody wants it. It needs a fair bit of work but the needle moves. :10bux:

RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga

The Stu posted:

I am just about completely new to sewing and am looking to pick up a first machine, and was wondering if I could get some opinions on this one: http://www.usedvictoria.com/classified-ad/9243294

Good buy? Is there anything I should look out for when buying used, besides that it works?

Thanks!

Doesn't look like that machine has a reverse. If you had a few machines you could make do with that but you'll want something more versatile, maybe 5 stitches, button hole features of some sort.


For the record you can sew on a single stitch industrial machine and get bitching result. That's my temporary solution but I still have a multi-function domestic machine for button wholes and light bar tacking. That and a home serger are how I've done my last few jeans. It's not particularly easy like this and I'll be upgrading equipment soon though, but an old boat anchor machines like that make a way better straight stitch than your average domestic machine.

Acc-Risk posted:

Are there any faster moving forums than those mentioned in the original post? I find it hard to believe that with sewing being such a huge hobby that there aren't faster moving forums out there. I find most get responses in days.

Patternreview isn't moving fast anymore? I was amazed to find such a fast moving forum about sewing.

RichBomb fucked around with this message at 05:44 on Jun 11, 2009

RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga

Don't let anybody tell you fashion design is fun.









104 pieces, and this is only for one cut, 8 sizes.

RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga

4R7 THi3F posted:

oh man, you graded all those patterns yourself? that sucks

Haha gently caress no, I had the professional lady grade them out. I suck at pattern stuff, I leave that to the professionals. Patterns are to important to screw up for anything resembling an industrial operation.

RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga

Blue_monday posted:

Dude. Where would I be able to find that pattern? or a pattern for jeans that arent ugly?
The only pattern you can find for jeans that aren't ugly are either going to be hideously expensive custom patterns (like mine, so I can sell jeans to goons lol) or will require gutting a pair of jeans with a good cut and using that as a pattern, and adding details as you like.

RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga

I finally have a blog up. paleodenim.blogspot.com

RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga

Finally got this fixed, selling it.






It runs like an absolute champion. $75 if anybody is interested, comes with cabinet. I can ship without the cabinet if you're willing to make yourself a little stand out of 2x4's. If you're close or inbetween to Cleveland or Syracuse I'll drop it off. paleo.denim@gmail.com

RichBomb fucked around with this message at 16:26 on Jun 26, 2009

RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga

Cross post from the far reaches of the indigonet.

Well I don't know how you guys spend your Saturday nights but here was last weeks doings.


Red wine and leftovers

and



an old Singer 15/19/whatever. I picked it up from a Salvation Army for 27 dollars, dropped some oil in it and it is a goddamned monster.

It was mine back at school in Syracuse, I had no room for it in the car so I gave it told this dude in my apartment building that his pregnant girlfriend could have the machine if she wanted. And I left. And a few weeks ago I went back, for homecoming. Preggers lady went to baby daddy "what if this baby doesn't look like you?"

:eek:

She ran away, leaving my beautiful machine in the cold dark hallway. And thus my homecoming sewing machine rescue was born.

Anyways.









I always +rep this kind of repair because I suck so loving bad at it. The sewing machine is my way.





Moleskin/iPhone damage



Reinforced the bottom, patched the corner



Other pocket just needed some lovin'









Normally I'd have gone for a much more elegant repair than this, but you remember the redwine. You see, the red wine went much faster than the repairs and so I just added some more belt loop I had in the sewing drawer.



And some boring crotch repairs, no pics.

Boredumb posted:

Nicely done. Are you still planning/making your own jeans?

Slowly. I'm doing an AmeriCorps year right now and just trying to learn and network as much as possible. I can't go back to making them like I was with only 3 super basic machines, I couldn't get production time below 10 hours a pair, just crazy. Should be some cool antics coming up next spring and summer, I'll post the antics here and on the blog.

Leonard Leroy posted:

My two year old Samurais had their first very, very, very minor stitching repairs, just to prevent actual damage. But i need to get ready for denim tears. I don't see foresee any, at the moment...

What I'm saying is that you need to put up some step by steps and what exactly you did.

It might be redundant, but one never knows when some new information will come up.

Crotch repairs I'm assuming? The best most basic advice I can give is to cut an appropriate size piece of denim for the damaged area (if it's on the crotch make sure it can curve or just use more than one piece).
With the jeans inside out/looking at the patch, lay down one or two lines of stitching to make sure the patch is in the right place.
Flip the jeans and run forward then reverse as slowly and smoothly as possible till you get the hang of it. Try to match the stitches to the grain of the denim if you want to blend the tones. It's actually a little frustrating at first because it requires patience without industrial equipment.

Here's my Cougar 001's repaired with that same machine. I ran a line of stitching down the selvedge line on the scrap, lined up with the inseam of the jeans. Then just back and forth, back and forth.




Notes for your sewing machine- use the sharpest needles you can, they don't have to be big, 14 will be fine for a home machine.
Be sure to turn the presser foot pressure up as high as you can get it.
For the darning (back and forth bit), make the changes in direction for the next row of stitching at the end of your last one. Go forward, end with the needle down, rotate slightly, go reverse, needle down, etc.
It doesn't have to be perfect, it just has to hold until you feel like repairing it again, so don't stress.

For stuff like the back pockets and watch pocket I just cut the current stitching, made an outline onto new fabric, cut it down a bit, and sewed it in. There are securing stitches you can't see because I used dark thread, tone on tone.

I'll make a video before Christmas.

RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga

nolen posted:

Another question: Would I be able to experiment with making jeans with this type of machine? I recently made a hoodie for the girlfriend with this machine and had some troubles getting through a few layers of material. Is it possible that I just wasn't using the right kind of foot/needle combination for the material, or is this type of machine not powerful enough to such things normally?

Again, thanks to everyone for the help. You guys/gals are fantastic.

Increase your presser foot pressure, get a sharp (not necessarily bigger) needle, 14/16 max. You'll need to spend a lot of time with your hand on the wheel of the machine and help feed it material more than your other stuff. Whether your machine survives is anyones guess.

RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga

my asian girlfriend posted:

I am a mechanical engineering student and for our term project in my design/failure analysis class, we have to analyze loads and points of failure on a device. Our device is an old serger(this one, specifically: https://wi.somethingawful.com/f0/f09ba635f44e613c8f0132093563f62a88437fdd.jpeg) that was donated to a group member. I have never used a sewing machine and I would assume some people here use them quite a bit.

For the project, we are supposed to choose parts that are most likely to fail. Basically, I am asking anyone who has used these machines extensively - where do they tend to break? Just looking at the machine and having no experience with sewing, the sewing needles seemed to be the most prone to breaking, which is why they are easily switched out. Besides the needles, where(if anywhere) have people noticed their machines breaking down? Any parts that tend to need more replacing than others? For the project, we are limited to analyzing metal parts, so we are focusing more on the drive shaft and all the arms/parts it moves, however anything metal is fair game.

Any help would be appreciated, as none of us know anyone who does a lot of sewing. Thanks guys.
Not sure if you're still working on this and I can't see your picture but look to the hook assembly (the part that swings around the bobbin) to come out of timing most frequently, especially in conjunction with needle breaks.

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RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga

Nexus-6 posted:

I'm hoping you guys can offer some advice. I'm looking to buy a sewing machine, but I don't need it to do anything mega fancy; I'll mostly be using it to mend stuff.

I definitely know how to sew, I was a costume design major in college, so I don't need a machine for n00bs, but I no longer have access to the 1980s metal Singer tank that was my mother's, as I moved to another state.
In looking at new machines online, it seems like everything is really plasticy and digital. Should I get a new machine? Hunt for an old one?

I'm hoping to spend around a hundred bucks, is that unrealistic?

Are you looking to be sewing for theatre? IE legit, my job depends on it sewing? A thrifted Singer + tune up will run you around $100. A used industrial (which will always stitch better) straight stitch will be about $200 with the reliability no domestic machine can offer. Just something to think about if you have the space and friends with strong backs and weak minds.

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