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Reverend Cheddar
Nov 6, 2005

wriggle cat is happy


Oh yay I'm happy I found this thread! Not that I have much to show for it now, but I go to fashion school and I was getting curious if there was a thread devoted to sewing :)

Reverend Cheddar fucked around with this message at 08:31 on Jul 22, 2018

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Reverend Cheddar
Nov 6, 2005

wriggle cat is happy


I made a dress! It feels good to know I've designed, patterned and sewn my own dress when I've only been doing it since April :)

Reverend Cheddar fucked around with this message at 08:31 on Jul 22, 2018

Reverend Cheddar
Nov 6, 2005

wriggle cat is happy


fredor posted:

Ah really, I've sewed a bit in the past. Made a nice pair of pajamas. I really want to get back into it though. Tomorrow I'm going to go find an old sewing machine at the goodwill place here. Then I have a tie pattern I will work on. Eventually I wanna make dress clothes that I can wear. Is male fashion easier to do than female fashion?

To some degree it's cheaper, since men's clothing doesn't use lining in places that women's clothing does (dress pants), but one isn't necessarily easier to sew than the other. The knowledge behind each pattern and understanding it is the trickier part. At least that's what I gleaned from attending school for women's fashion and then studying menswear all by myself from a book written in a language that I don't know how to speak. :downs: Luckily patterns are kind of self-explanatory to a degree once you've been doing them for a while.

What my school did to teach us how to do tailored collars, jackets etc, was to have us make only half of a jacket for samples. Gave us the chance to leave the garment open, to really get a feel for how it's put together. Useful for when you're first starting out on tailored collars and lapels and figuring out how to get points nice and pointy.

Reverend Cheddar
Nov 6, 2005

wriggle cat is happy


Leather's definitely going to require a 'smaller' size needle (the lower the number of your needle, the thicker it is. ie a 7 should be thicker than a 9. This is, of course, the opposite for machine needles. :downsrim: ). And I cannot stress enough, be as precise as you can when you're sewing it. With fabric you can press away any missed holes with the iron, but leather? Your screw-ups will remain forever. Maybe get another toggle to make a sample with first to make sure you know what you're doing.

Also, nothin' says you can't use upholstery needles to hand-sew leather, either. Upholstery needles are already meant to poke through even the toughest poo poo possible to sew, and they can be especially convenient to use because of their rounded shape. Just don't use a huge knitting needle and you should be okay.

Reverend Cheddar
Nov 6, 2005

wriggle cat is happy


Cerri posted:

I've decreed I can sew no more till I get all my craft/sewing poo poo organized. To that end, I've been working on a wall unit to hold all my sewing/crafting stuff. I'm looking for more creative organization ideas than "put poo poo in boxes on shelves".

How do you guys keep your stuff wrangled, to prevent it taking over the house like mine currently is?

For fabric I have one gigantic huge-rear end cardboard box. I stack the fabric in it nicely :( Then I have a little cubby (... another cardboard box; livin' large here folks) for my toolbox and other stuff like styling tools. It's kinda spilling over a little, I need to clean that one too. No time to draft, sew, or clean these days though. Grr.

Reverend Cheddar
Nov 6, 2005

wriggle cat is happy


Hana Dammit posted:

collars

I usually sew raw edges of front bodice and under collar together, then fold the yoke raw edge under to cover the over collar and then stitch on the crease of the front bodice/under collar seam. If I had a way to draw it it would make so much more sense :sigh:
If you don't have a yoke, you'd see the front bodice/under collar the same way, but then you'd have to turn the raw edge of the over collar inside, and either seam-stitch or hand stitch it closed.

If it doesn't make sense, I'm sorry, English isn't my first language in sewing :/

Reverend Cheddar
Nov 6, 2005

wriggle cat is happy


Hana Dammit posted:

/\/\/\/\ ughhh that is such a good idea!!! I am going to try it next time, or perhapse later today if my dissatisfaction at what I ended up doing gets any greater...

So after that post I decided to follow my heart and get stoned out of my gourd. When I came to an hour later, the collar was sewn on, all my button holes were finished and 4/6 buttons attached! I am not 100% pleased with the turn out of my collar. The method I used was illustrated in my previous post, but I think I am just generally dissatisfied with the shape? Or something, I can't put my finger on it yet. Before I do anything crazy though my model is gonna come try it on and maybe it'll look better...

Gonna spend some time in the future working on collars more, they're so neat when executed properly but it's just not a concept ive fully grasped yet...

Looks good to me, from what I can see! Collar trickiness is often about attaching them and getting crisp points.

For attaching I usually go with a little golden rule and sew up to about two-three cm before the... I don't know what to call it, the seam line ?(where the seam will be on the finished product). Gives you space to work with attaching collar seams and helps prevent goofy bulk if you don't have a yoke to just tuck the seam into.
Pointy points though, I sorta cheat. :ohdear: When I sew the point I slip a bit of basting thread around the sewing needle and sew around it. So when I'm ready to turn it out front, after cutting down the selvedge, I just pull the strings and voila, perfect points. Cheating makes sewing fun :downs:

Reverend Cheddar
Nov 6, 2005

wriggle cat is happy


Hana Dammit posted:

/\/\/\ babylocks are worth their weight in gold

I used them all the time in Japan and miss them (and my industrial Juki) so bad. :sad:

I loooove that sweater. I wish I knew how to knit more than a scarf.

Reverend Cheddar
Nov 6, 2005

wriggle cat is happy


Muffy_the_Diver posted:

Eden: Pick up the Reader's Digest Complete Guide to Sewing at your library or goodwill or something, they're seriously indispensable. All the basics are in there, although you will probably still need the manual for your specific machine, to figure out how to thread it, whether or not you need to oil it and where, etc. Eventually you'll memorize it all, though! Congrats :)

The Reader's Digest book on sewing is super awesome. I don't refer to mine much, unfortunately, since I already knew everything by the time I got it, but it's a very good resource. Also an awesome book, also by Readers Digest, is their guide to needlework. Embroidery, knitting, crochet, lace, rug-weaving; it's an incredible resource. My mom and I got a copy each for a dollar at a local Goodwill. :smug:

Reverend Cheddar
Nov 6, 2005

wriggle cat is happy


Shnooks posted:

I need some sewing help - I'm sewing a dress with a rayon-blend challis and it seems like no matter what I do my tension is off. I'm using size 90/16 sharps for the needle and regular polyester sewing thread. What gives? Should I use a smaller needle or a ballpoint?

Smaller needle. Try 80/11?

Reverend Cheddar
Nov 6, 2005

wriggle cat is happy


Shnooks posted:

I have some so I'll try that. I had a feeling I should have been using the 80/11. Luckily I've only sewn the darts up, nothing major together.

It should be okay! I also hand baste first if I'm going to be sewing delicate stuff.
(btw I have contact info for a lady whose work you might be interested in, who specializes in saganishiki weaving...!)

Reverend Cheddar
Nov 6, 2005

wriggle cat is happy


Rufus En Fuego posted:

Butterick and McCall's are on sale for $1.99 online, and Vogue's $3.99. Limit 10 per customer.

Further discount if you're a member of Club BMV.

Noooo I'm broke don't tell me things like this :cry:

Reverend Cheddar
Nov 6, 2005

wriggle cat is happy


Nione posted:

So, I'm going to be starting a flapper costume pretty soon and needed some advice. I can't seem to find a pattern for one (even though ALL of the major brands USED to have flapper dress patterns, now the only way to get them is to pay $20 on ebay or something!). I have sewn things without patterns before (mostly skirts and pillows), so I SHOULD be able to figure out a very simple sheath dress like I want. My question is on the neckline. I want either straight across with straps or v-neck. The straight across with straps would be easiest, because it's literally a tube from my neckline to my hips. However, I have wide hips, my shoulders and waist are my narrowest parts. I want the waistline to fall at my hips and then I'm doing a slightly wider/flared skirt covered in peacock feathers and beaded fringe. If I make the tube my boob width at the top and then flare out to my hip width at the bottom, is that going to look ridiculous? Should I try and add darts? The ideal situation would be to have it be large enough that it slips over my head without a zipper. Do I need to just buy some white muslin, give it a shot, and see what it looks like?

For my fabric, I was hoping to make the top part sheer or chiffon. (I'll wear a slip or something underneath) I've never sewn with sheer fabric before, do I need special needles or something? Also, when it comes to hemming the neckline/finishing seams, what do I need to know so it doesn't look like crap? (My seams are traditionally terrible unless something is lined!) Oh, and my sewing machine doesn't do zigzag stitch, will a straight stitch be okay for lightweight fabrics like that?

Finally, any good resources for either hand embroidery/beading or a place where you can have appliques made to your specification? I want peacock feathers embroidered/beaded around the neckline to go along with the feathers I'm using as fringe on the bottom of the dress.

Ooookay bit of a tall order here. If you want it to slip over your head but not have a zipper and not be stretch, you can do it if you go for an a-line or trapeze line as long as its not super flared. My gut is telling me that with your proportions a 'normal' flapper dress is just gonna be odd. And just as a rule, unless you're as flat as Robin the Boy Wonder, you need darts. Us women are curvy.

For your finishes, since you want sheer/chiffon I will advise against facings and recommend a veeeery thin bias strip instead for those spots. I know they'll be a bitch to sew but the facings will definitely show otherwise. Use the smallest size needle possible. Straight seams will be okay, just be very careful. The one good thing about sheer fabric is that you have leeway to cheat a little on the seam finishes: sew on the selvedges about 2mm away from your seam, another one 2mm from that, then cut off the excess.

Appliqués though, I dunno. :(

Reverend Cheddar
Nov 6, 2005

wriggle cat is happy


Goldaline posted:

wing collar

I love that idea. And the inherent pun. :golfclap:

Reverend Cheddar
Nov 6, 2005

wriggle cat is happy


I hate English patterns. The wording is so drat confusing. If I buy a store bought pattern I almost just throw out the instructions cause I know what I'm doing. :p

Anyway, I will tell you what to do and why.

1. Baste yoke and shirt together. It's keeping the edges straight for ya.
2. Sew the collar, but NOT the bottom; leave that open cause you have to turn it inside out and sew the band on. Clip the corners to help get a nice peak when you finally turn it right side out (or use my cheat code which I've posted before)
3. Whichever is the inside band part, iron up the side which you sew onto the shirt. The pattern says to trim it down; I usually don't. The reason we do this will become clear in a bit.
4. Now match the collar band to the collar -- the shorter side will be what you sew onto the collar. At this point the COLLAR is right side out, the BAND is wrong side out. Now you sew the band together -- sewing through the collar, yes -- and just like you did with the collar, leave the bottom edge open. Now once you have done that, turn the band inside out, iron it. If you did it right, your inner band's selvage should be turned INSIDE the band, and the outside edge will still be free.
5. Sew together the outside band to BOTH yoke and shirt. Don't sew the inside band, JUST the outside.
6. If you want to hand stitch this last part, go ahead, but I am very lazy and I just go for the machine finish. This is also why I don't cut down my seam allowance: because I can use the folded edge of the inside band to match with the selvage edge of the shirt and yoke. Once you do that, sew a couple mm away from the edge of the band, then sew inside that about 5mm, like on a dress shirt.

If you have any more questions just ask!

Reverend Cheddar
Nov 6, 2005

wriggle cat is happy


Shnooks posted:

I'll try this tomorrow. I was going to message you on Facebook but figured I'd just ask here :v:. Sometimes I feel like sewing patterns are written in another language, and I'm pretty good at deciphering that stuff (I'm fluent in knitting and crochet :v:)

And I'm the opposite! I can't read needlework patterns. Like wth is k1p1stsk272729p18367:@29 AUUGH.

(on another note I am totally immature cause seeing 'pagina' on those patterns makes me snort with laughter. Hoo boy)

Reverend Cheddar
Nov 6, 2005

wriggle cat is happy


NancyPants posted:

I've never made a quilt before. I'm a beginner at sewing and I think a quilt would be a good way to get really familiar with the machine and sewing basics.

I want to make this and I can't for the life of me figure out how to piece these blocks. Does anyone have a pattern or tips? It was posted several pages ago and I can't remember by whom since I just saved the picture.

e: Is anyone using or has used a Brother LS-2125i? I'm having a hell of a time with upper and lower thread tension. After rewinding bobbins and fiddling with upper tension to no end, I finally started messing with the bobbin tension and can't remember where it was set at the factory. Any tips?



Think of it as made up of 3x3 blocks. Sew together two 1x1 pieces. Then sew a 1x2 perpendicular to the first seam. Then sew another 1x2 parallel to the first seam. Last, finish it off with a 1x3 strip.
When piecing a quilt, look at the seams, not the shapes :)

Reverend Cheddar
Nov 6, 2005

wriggle cat is happy


Hmm you might have measured it a bit off in that case. Do you have a pic of what it looks like now?

Reverend Cheddar
Nov 6, 2005

wriggle cat is happy


handbags at dawn posted:

At some shops you can find fabric that is 108" or 110" wide which is great for backing quilts, but yeah the common method is to pick a print or solid (if you're going to use a print, something small or subtle is best so it isn't obvious that you're joining pieces) and piece the back. If you do piece two or three large pieces together, what I was always told was to use a bigger seam allowance than normal when quilting, like 1/2", for stability.

I see a lot of quilters making pieced backs for their quilts out of scraps left over from the top of the quilt - I haven't tried it yet but it's an appealing idea. Here's an example: http://www.swatchandstitch.com/storage/post-images/IMG_0270-1.jpg

It's funny that you said that about you were using the wrong seam allowance - I'm working on a quilt that is kind of a modified log cabin and couldn't figure out why my blocks were perfectly square but not the right measurement. Until I finally noticed last night that the inner square right in the middle has the wrong seam allowance. But since it's that way on all of them, they're all the same. I'll be interested to see once I get all the blocks together whether I can tell or not.

Blast it, I had a reply ready but the Awful app was being an utter butt. Anyway yeah, you can find 108" around. It's uncommon, though not rare. Problem is it's almost always plain white or muslin. Lately Northcott came out with a series of rockface 108" fabric that weve been selling where I work: http://www.christianlanequilters.com/northcott.html
(Though of course we're selling it at a knee jerking $20/yd, ew.)

Side note: it's a curse and a blessing to work at a fabric store. I've had to develop an immense willpower to stop myself buying up every fabric I like with my employee discount and a meager paycheck. :saddowns:
When we started carrying Dear Stella and Amy Butler's Lark collection I thought I was gonna go mad resisting the urge to buy. (I gave in eventually.)

Reverend Cheddar
Nov 6, 2005

wriggle cat is happy


taiyoko posted:

Another possibly stupid question about facings:

The pattern I have has separate neckline and armhole facings, and is princess-seamed. Is it possible to redraft the facings into a combination facing? Or is this just a retarded idea?

Not retarded, and it's pretty easy to do. With that method though your sewing steps will be kinda different though (you'll sew the side seams last, because you have to turn the bodice parts inside out and you can't do that when your side seams are sewn. I'll elaborate when my phone isn't about to die)

Okey doke. Without me seeing the pattern it's a bit hard for me to figure out exactly how you need to draft the pattern but it shouldn't be too big of a deal.
First: trace out the center and side bodice patterns. If you're using a store-bought pattern, make sure you do not include the 1.5 seam allowance along the princess seam, because you're going to be joining those two together. Next, cut them both out and piece them together. Now, I haven't seen your pattern so I don't know what kind of dart tenkai we're dealing with, but I'm assuming that because it's a princess seam, you don't need to be concerned with compensating for the fabric that would be included in the dart; you'll just need to piece it together. If it's not, tell me and I'll see what you've got, then tell you how to fix it.
Now you can draw out your facing, hooray! I usually start 3cm down from the armhole seam and end about... oh... 5cm up from the bust line or so. (It's probably not marked on your pattern, so tell me what kind of collar you have and I'll give you a guesstimate of how long that facing should be in the center). Follow pretty much the same steps for the back facing. For the back facing seam, I think 15cm down from the collar line should be ok.
You want to draw a kind of flat S shape in order to connect things and make it all smooth -- I kinda think of a sports bra or something when I draw mine. Similar shape to what you see here (although I would've made my facing a bit longer in the middle than she did): http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-FNT7VfLXs4w/Tx9a2_mBrKI/AAAAAAAAA2o/boYL1IONCYQ/s1600/F2465+Marfy+Top+7.jpg

Now, the tricky part logic-wise is to sew it all together. On both the bodice and the facing, sew together only the shoulder seams. Don't connect the side seams. Instead, lay the facing wrong-side up on your (right-side up) bodice, and sew it together along the collar line first. You'll do the same for the armhole seam, but start and finish 2-3cm away from the sides. (It'll be clear a little later why) My dirty trick for making this look really professional is to baste the facing about a millimeter outside the bodice, eeever so slightly, and sew along the bodice's actual seam. This will make it so that the facing seam itself is hidden about a millimeter underneath the bodice and you will not see it from the outside once it's finished. I'd cut little bias cuts around these seams too so that you don't get any funny lumps once you've ironed it out.
Now that you've got a funny little tube made, you'll be turning it inside out, so pull the back bodice pieces through your little tubes and presto, you have the 'American armhole facing' (that's what we called it in Japan, dunno what you call it in English.)
In order to finish this off, now you can sew up the side seams on both the facing and the bodice. Remember how I told you to sew the armhole seam 2-3cm away? That's to make sure you've actually got room to sew together the side seams and press them flat. So, once you're done with that, you can now sew together the last bits of the armhole seam, give that a few bias cuts to make it drape nicely, and you are done.

I can take some pics of one that I just did myself, although you're all going to laugh at me now because I accidentally shifted my facing 1mm below the bodice and so now I've got what looks like 1mm piping all around the collar and armholes. And I call myself a seamstress :eng99:

Reverend Cheddar fucked around with this message at 21:54 on Jun 5, 2012

Reverend Cheddar
Nov 6, 2005

wriggle cat is happy


Shnooks posted:

I can't be the only person with this problem. Is anyone here absolutely baffled by pattern sizes? I'm trying to make a skirt now and I can't figure out for the life of me what size I am.

I've always sewn my patterns in size 6 or 8, but i liked to double check each time I start a pattern. This is the pattern I'm attempting. If I go by the measurements on the back, I'm a size 16! I tried measuring the actual pattern at the waistline and subtracting the seam allowance but it still seemed way too big for a waistline (Size 6 came out to like 34" or something). I can't for the life of me find the finished garment measurements on the pattern.

My actual measurements are a 29-30" waist (depends how much I ate :V) and a 40" hip. How the hell do you navigate this? I need a skirt, my butt is too big for pants now D:!

Hmm it ought to be on the front skirt. Otherwise what do the finished measurements on the back say (should be the very last row)?
I kinda get the same problem; my measurements come out to size 12 when I can easily work 6 or 8, usually an 8 though. Anyway, go with your waist measurement on this skirt (waist being about 5cm above the belly button, not your natural waist). There's also nothin that says you can't make a muslin out of the pattern first to see if it really is too big or not.

Reverend Cheddar
Nov 6, 2005

wriggle cat is happy


Prune Juice posted:

This thread is so amazing. I just purchased my first sewing machine (I've only taken 2 measly classes so I am a beginner at this)and I was wondering where do you guys get your metal bobbins, thread, and other sewing supplies from? There aren't any sewing stores where I live so I have to rely on online resources. Thanks in advance.

My old dressmaking school in Japan. :ohdear: The quality of the tools here is just... it doesn't even compare. I feel like a scrub using Dritz.
I am not totally sure what site carried some of the tools, etc but I think it was called Shibori Dragons. Their site design looks kinda like babby's first HTML but they carry materials you can't find outside Japan so easily.

Reverend Cheddar
Nov 6, 2005

wriggle cat is happy


Bean posted:

I think I'm working with a bum pattern. Surely you've all felt this.

I'm trying to make a suit coat. I've actually put suit coat sleeves in before, but not on this particular pattern, and it's giving me fits.

After working on it and trimming away the corners in the arm holes in the back (seriously -- do they think I have back spikes?), this is what I'm getting:



With the shoulder pads placed in and with me inside



Just on a hanger

It LOOKS like there's too much cloth in the front, and I could solve some stuff just by making the armhole come in a little more, but I figured I'd check with some people who knew what was up before I started doing the whole scissors thing. Ideas?

First thing that comes to mind is that you might need a sleeve head (and your shoulder pad should be out a little more. Match it to the edge of the selvedge, not the seam). Have you put the liner in yet? That's usually what causes the problem for me.

edit: also, I'm sure you've done this, but measure the seams on your pattern of the bodice armhole and the sleeve seam, to see how much you need to gather the amount on the sleeve.

Reverend Cheddar fucked around with this message at 00:31 on Jul 24, 2012

Reverend Cheddar
Nov 6, 2005

wriggle cat is happy


Rufus En Fuego posted:

I know it's archaic, but doing buttonholes by hand is really satisfying.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buttonhole_stitch

I do all my buttonholes by hand :whatup: Just cause my last machine didn't work the feeder with the buttonhole attachment well.
But done well and with proper thread, handsewn buttonholes will last a lot longer.

Reverend Cheddar
Nov 6, 2005

wriggle cat is happy


Does anyone know of a good online retailer that has a good variety of lining fabric? I'm looking for something more interesting than just solid colors. I wanna make a peacoat I'm working on more interesting than just 'slab grey inside and out' and all I find are solids.

Reverend Cheddar
Nov 6, 2005

wriggle cat is happy


Queen Elizatits posted:

Hey sewing friends! Just a heads up Butterick and Vogue patterns just went on sale this morning for $4.99 and $3.99 respectively. I had coincidentally put a bunch of stuff in my cart last night and then forgot about it so it was awesome to wake up to them being more than half off :)


I want to buy a serger but I keep getting overwhelmed with the amount of options out there. Would you recommend the baby lock for someone who only ever sews spandex? Which one do you have if you don't mind me asking?

Dagnabbit. I just bought a new machine, I don't need to be spending more money! (Singer Fashion Mate for the curious. Normally $300 but Amazon Prime takes it down to $130. Haven't given it a test drive yet due to Real Life poo poo takin priority).

Anyway, for lock machines, use Baby Lock. There is no other acceptable answer :colbert:

Reverend Cheddar
Nov 6, 2005

wriggle cat is happy


Tasoth posted:

So I'm attempting a halloween costume and I am using 100% polyester. I just spent an hour or two trying to sew it to no avail. The over thread (right term?) and bobbin thread aren't locking together or only doing it once. Is this to do with the needle size?

A few things come to mind:

1) Wrong size needle for the fabric
2) If it's a knit, then you aren't using a ballpoint needle
3) Your thread tension is out of whack

Usually it's the third, but make sure you're using the right needle too. Is it a weave or a knit?

Reverend Cheddar
Nov 6, 2005

wriggle cat is happy


BIG CITY LAWYER posted:

Basically what I'm asking is this something that can be fixed somewhat easily?

... :ohdear:

...

... :smith:

I'm just gonna be straight-up honest; you picked possibly one of the most impossible types of dress to alter. Not only is this a no-shoulder f&f, it's also got that draping which I can almost guarantee is not going to survive going larger.

Logistically speaking, it is far easier and much more feasible (and this goes for any piece of clothing) to have things taken in, than taken up. You're dealing with a finite amount of fabric, after all, and the tailor has to work with what's there. We can't magically poof the perfect fabric to match the dress out of nowhere. Saying so, is there any possible way you can return yours, get a bigger size and have them take in the waist? Otherwise the tailor you go to is gonna bill you a lot more than you think, I think...

Reverend Cheddar
Nov 6, 2005

wriggle cat is happy


BIG CITY LAWYER posted:

That's basically what the dress does already when I'm wearing it. It sqooshes the hell out of my boobs! This is how I was able to get it on: put it on backwards. Zip up a bit. Suck it in. Finagle the zipper the rest of the way up. Dress is now on backwards! Reconsider life choices. Spend 5 minutes slowly but surely twisting dress around to the front. Shove my boobs in. Further reconsider life choices. Marvel at how much straighter I'm standing. Wonder if I can sit. Imagine a terrible moment of zipper breaking in the middle of Gangnam Style dance. Try to dance. Realize its 11 at night and you're wearing a ball gown and dancing in your bathroom. Post on the internet.

I'm hoping that since I do not care at all what the back looks like that it will give them more leeway to do something. Seriously they could put looney tunes fabric back there. I'll keep you guys updated!

It's your boobs, though. You're asking them to fix the y-axis but only using the x-axis :/ The issue isn't just having enough space, but making sure that this actually fits you like clothes are supposed to do. The proportions, cut, etc... (that's the problem with RTW clothes, I think! You can't just plug numbers into CAD and expect to come out with a perfect pattern every time. As I like to tell people I live in a world of millimeters; that's how exact a lot of stuff is...)

Just for reference, how big of a difference are we talking about with bust v. fit? Give hard numbers. Is it just the dress being a size too small or is this like, unholy muffin top drooping like cheez-whiz from the canister?

Reverend Cheddar
Nov 6, 2005

wriggle cat is happy


BIG CITY LAWYER posted:

Anything involving clothes making is so far out of my area of knowledge, so thank you ladies for being so helpful. I can provide numbers when i get home. For reference, here's a photo of it on. You can see the dreaded fatty overhang by my arm there.

Pardon the messy bathroom. http://imgur.com/olrCa.jpg

S'okay. My bedroom is worse!

Anyway... well at least this isn't a total integer overflow we're dealing with. There's gotta be like spanx or something that could help you out. It wouldn't be totally impossible to fix this one, but the added fabric would absolutely have to be on the side seams and I dunno if there's enough fabric on that drape over the bodice for it.

Otherwise, welp. Ladies have been sucking it in and belting up their chests since the beginning of history; you could just think of it as carrying on a long tradition :v:

Reverend Cheddar
Nov 6, 2005

wriggle cat is happy


I would baste it, but that's what school beat into me to do anyway. I think Clover makes wronder clips still?

Reverend Cheddar
Nov 6, 2005

wriggle cat is happy


Mizufusion posted:

Yeah, I think I'll try that. I was excited about them at first because the pattern was cheap, the fabric was free, and I don't have many pants that fit. They've been sitting on a chair in my kitchen untouched for over a week now. :sigh:

E: I just remembered the pants already have darts in the back. Why the gently caress are there darts and gathering on the same edge? There's only an inch of fabric that needs to be gathered in back, too. :mad:

:stonk: This is why I hate store-bought patterns sometimes, it's like they think that people who want to sew want mom jeans. drat it, we sew because we don't like what's offered in the store and we know we can do better!

If you hadn't already cut it out I'd suggest just making it into a yoke, but... hmm. Could you do a little fudging and take out that ease on the side seam, maybe? I'm just baffled as to why you would need to have a dart and gathering on the back of pants. You put darts or a yoke there so as to not give yourself Junk in the Trunk Syndrome, why would you gather it and give yourself half-junk back there? I swear sometimes these patterners must be using a horse's rear end for a tailoring body sometimes.

I bought my new Singer a month ago and haven't even taken it out of the box yet. drat you college!

Reverend Cheddar
Nov 6, 2005

wriggle cat is happy


Rufus En Fuego posted:

Mmmm. Tacky boxy shirts ftw.

I remember pillowcase dresses being an easy thing to make/wear when I was a kid and was recently surprised to find out that they've been making a comeback.

:psyduck: My god.
Actually I secretly think about how fun it would be to sew clothes for my daughter, if I have one. :3: I'd probably dress the poor girl in a bizarre Schiaparelli slash Commes des Garçons pattern explosion though. She'd either love me to death or hate me forever.

Reverend Cheddar
Nov 6, 2005

wriggle cat is happy


Stultus Maximus posted:

It's even worse if you're trying to make mens' clothing.

Don't worry, I'm pretty sure that's half the reason my boyfriend's dating me. :v: He's my guinea pig for practicing how to draft men's patterns.

Reverend Cheddar
Nov 6, 2005

wriggle cat is happy


I was doing a bit of a fabric consultation for a Brazilian drag queen once. It was Halloween and the theme for the week's show was monsters. So this queen's idea was 'Do Cookie Monster no Praia de Copacabana'. Cookie Monster at the beach. The coup de grace of this was going to be a blue fur bikini top where the nipples were going to be Cookie Monster's googly eyes.

I never asked the occasion of anyone's garment again after that.

Reverend Cheddar
Nov 6, 2005

wriggle cat is happy


Pile of Kittens posted:

edit: AND WHY DOES EVERYTHING SMELL LIKE PUSSY

Crazy cat lady quilters? :ohdear: Getting bad memories of cat fabric sales at work...

Reverend Cheddar
Nov 6, 2005

wriggle cat is happy


Baaad idea. Clothes aren't made on straight lines. Your shirt will fit very strangely and you won't be able to do either flat-felled or French seams right. Sewing's one of those things where even though it seems like you can cut corners (... :rimshot: ) you really can't. Trust me on this.

Reverend Cheddar fucked around with this message at 03:25 on Dec 3, 2012

Reverend Cheddar
Nov 6, 2005

wriggle cat is happy


Pile of Kittens posted:

I don't know what Rev. Cheddar is talking about, as that tutorial shows curved seams.

It's just been my experience when people are doing an alteration like this for the first time that they don't realize that seams like that aren't necessarily straight.

Reverend Cheddar
Nov 6, 2005

wriggle cat is happy


Well, yeah, we've all been there. And god knows I was raked over the coals for my own sewing work many times before, for trying to cut corners without fully understanding what I was doing. That's more what my point is about rather than if the seam is straight or curved or not (as you said that doesn't really matter).

In any case I just wanna help the guy, hopefully getting him started on the right foot the right way, is all :ohdear:

Reverend Cheddar fucked around with this message at 08:12 on Dec 5, 2012

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Reverend Cheddar
Nov 6, 2005

wriggle cat is happy


Yeah, that part you can go hog wild with if you feel like you need to get it out of the way (I don't just cause I know I'd poke myself with a pin unawares, and getting blood on something you've been working on sucks). Just make 100% sure that what you are sewing (the seam) is flat and perfectly lined up and you should be good.

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