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Stupid_Sexy_Flander
Mar 14, 2007

Is a man not entitled to the haw of his maw?


Grimey Drawer

I think the best take on "Door to hell" I have read was where the CERN experiment ended up opening a dimensional rift and let demons and poo poo loose, but YOU COULDN'T SEE THEM ON CAMERA cause... reasons I guess, so the inspection/spec ops team that goes in to investigate blows the gently caress outta a lot of them but the camera playback just shows em going wild and blowing poo poo up for no reason.

I think it was supposed to start a new series but the author didn't do any more of them

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navyjack
Jul 15, 2006





Iím gonna post this in the SFF thread too, but does anybody remember a book with a magic system that had practitioners learning foreign languages as a kind of ďmagical circuit breakerĒ in their minds? Like it could be Klingon or French or Old Estruscan, but the one step remove from being their native language kept the magical energies from blasting their minds apart? I need to know if Iím imagining this or if itís real so I can use it in something if I made it up.

Lemniscate Blue
Apr 21, 2006

Here we go again.

navyjack posted:

Iím gonna post this in the SFF thread too, but does anybody remember a book with a magic system that had practitioners learning foreign languages as a kind of ďmagical circuit breakerĒ in their minds? Like it could be Klingon or French or Old Estruscan, but the one step remove from being their native language kept the magical energies from blasting their minds apart? I need to know if Iím imagining this or if itís real so I can use it in something if I made it up.

Dresden Files has this going on.

ToxicFrog
Apr 26, 2008




RCarr posted:

Iím looking for a book I read a long time ago. Itís about cave explorers that find a giant door deep underground. The climax of the story is that it ends up being a door to hell

RCarr posted:

I donít think either of these are it. I specifically remember a part where they use sonar on the door and determine the chamber beyond has no end.

The Door in the Dragon's Throat by Frank E. Peretti?

I had a bunch of those "Cooper Kids Adventures" books as a kid and didn't realize they were meant to be Christian propaganda until much later.

RCarr
Dec 24, 2007



ToxicFrog posted:

The Door in the Dragon's Throat by Frank E. Peretti?

I had a bunch of those "Cooper Kids Adventures" books as a kid and didn't realize they were meant to be Christian propaganda until much later.

I think this is it. I must have read this in middle school or so, I didnít even remember any Christian overtones. Thanks!

Take the plunge! Okay!
Feb 24, 2007




navyjack posted:

Iím gonna post this in the SFF thread too, but does anybody remember a book with a magic system that had practitioners learning foreign languages as a kind of ďmagical circuit breakerĒ in their minds? Like it could be Klingon or French or Old Estruscan, but the one step remove from being their native language kept the magical energies from blasting their minds apart? I need to know if Iím imagining this or if itís real so I can use it in something if I made it up.

Either this is real or we're both imagining. However, I haven't read Dresden so it's probably Bakker, I guess? Let us know which one it was.

Gats Akimbo
May 28, 2007

Ignoring this post


Take the plunge! Okay! posted:

Either this is real or we're both imagining. However, I haven't read Dresden so it's probably Bakker, I guess? Let us know which one it was.

Or Ben Aaronovitch's Peter Grant/Rivers of London series? Magicians there usually use Latin, but there's a lot of "be real careful using magic or it'll swiss-cheese your brain" in it.

navyjack
Jul 15, 2006





Take the plunge! Okay! posted:

Either this is real or we're both imagining. However, I haven't read Dresden so it's probably Bakker, I guess? Let us know which one it was.

Thanks for responses. Iíve never read Bakker, so that canít be it. Someone suggested that Iím misremembering Iron Druid and I think theyíre right, so Iím going to try to track down the relevant bit.

Mazerunner
Apr 22, 2010

Good Hunter, what... what is this post?


I've been trying to find this one sci-fi short story. I read it online.

It was about this dude who was an officer in a space imperium, who was a huge gently caress-up and lost every battle. Except his older brother was a military genius who was leading a campaign to reunite the systems or whatever, but when he came back he tried to take over the empire.

Younger brother beat the older brother by hi-jacking his tactical displays to showcase various failures, and had one fleet focus entirely on killing older brother's fighter pilot girlfriend. Older brother committed suicide in despair, and younger was like, "guess he never learned to fail "

GotLag
Jul 17, 2005

食べちゃダメだよ


Mazerunner posted:

I've been trying to find this one sci-fi short story. I read it online.

It was about this dude who was an officer in a space imperium, who was a huge gently caress-up and lost every battle. Except his older brother was a military genius who was leading a campaign to reunite the systems or whatever, but when he came back he tried to take over the empire.

Younger brother beat the older brother by hi-jacking his tactical displays to showcase various failures, and had one fleet focus entirely on killing older brother's fighter pilot girlfriend. Older brother committed suicide in despair, and younger was like, "guess he never learned to fail "

Firstborn, by Brandon Sanderson

http://www.mayofamily.com/RLM/txt_Sanderson_Firstborn.html

Mazerunner
Apr 22, 2010

Good Hunter, what... what is this post?



Thank you!

ToxicFrog
Apr 26, 2008




RCarr posted:

I think this is it. I must have read this in middle school or so, I didnít even remember any Christian overtones. Thanks!

I had four of those books as a kid, and while I don't remember a lot of the details, I do remember that every book hits most or all of these plot beats:
- the family travels somewhere where the dominant religion is not Christianity and the culture is generally hostile to Christians
- they are saved from certain death by sheer chance, which they attribute to divine providence
- they pray for strength in the face of adversity and are refreshed and encouraged thereby
- one of the locals converts to Christianity after meeting them (or reveals themselves to have been secretly Christian all along) and helps them in their quest
- the main hazard or antagonist(s) of the book turns out either personify (or, in the case of Door, actually be) something bad from the Bible
- the antagonists are undone by their own moral failings while the Cooper family live to adventure another day by following their faith

Trabant
Nov 26, 2011

All systems nominal.


Hi all. I just learned about this thread so I'm hoping you can help me take out a brain splinter but my memory's shot...

The book in question is science fiction, Soviet (or Soviet-adjacent) in origin, and I believe is part of a series. The story is set in huge structures/cities floating or orbiting in space and that's about the most memorable aspect of it. I don't think there are any aliens or space monsters, it's more of a "man against nature" kind of thing. Dealing with disasters, technical problems, exploration. I also don't recall any overtly Soviet ideology, but I was about 12 and living in so who knows whether it just went over my head.

It dates to at least the early 90s, but it's probably a solid couple of decades older than that. It's not be Stanislaw Lem, I'm pretty sure of that

Selachian
Oct 9, 2012



Trabant posted:

Hi all. I just learned about this thread so I'm hoping you can help me take out a brain splinter but my memory's shot...

The book in question is science fiction, Soviet (or Soviet-adjacent) in origin, and I believe is part of a series. The story is set in huge structures/cities floating or orbiting in space and that's about the most memorable aspect of it. I don't think there are any aliens or space monsters, it's more of a "man against nature" kind of thing. Dealing with disasters, technical problems, exploration. I also don't recall any overtly Soviet ideology, but I was about 12 and living in so who knows whether it just went over my head.

It dates to at least the early 90s, but it's probably a solid couple of decades older than that. It's not be Stanislaw Lem, I'm pretty sure of that

If it wasn't for the Soviet aspect, I'd say you were describing James Blish's Cities in Flight series.

Captain Monkey
Aug 23, 2007



.

Posting this to find an old post because I forgot it again.

branedotorg
Jun 19, 2009


Selachian posted:

If it wasn't for the Soviet aspect, I'd say you were describing James Blish's Cities in Flight series.

Same.

Trabant
Nov 26, 2011

All systems nominal.


You know... I think you two might be right! Reading the wiki entry, these parts:

quote:

In this future, the Soviet Union still exists and the Cold War is still ongoing. As a result, Western civil liberties have been eroded more and more, until society eventually resembles the Soviet model.
...
the Cold War ended with the peaceful merging of the Eastern and Western blocs into a single, planet-wide Soviet-ruled dictatorship

make me think my child brain (and eventual passage of time addling said brain) interpreted that as actually being written by a Soviet writer.

The synopsis of the first two books is also very much along the lines of what I remember: less aliens/robots and more adventure/intrigue.

So I'm absolutely taking Cities in Flight to be the thing which has been stuck in my brain for 30 years. It's a. freaking. relief. Thank you!

GhostDog
Jul 29, 2003

Always see everything.


I've been thinking about this randomly for years, and while it doesn't really bother me and I don't even think it was that good I wouldn't mind putting a name to this.

Sometime in the 80s (probably) I read some techno thriller about a deep sea oil drilling operation, coporate espionage and sabotage. The hook of the book, as I remember it, was the technology they used to get to the oil, which was building a massive shaft/tube right down the ocean floor, hundreds(?) of meters in diameter and kilometers deep. I don't remember what the reasoning behind that was but I remember being fascinated by the discussions on the logistics and physics of building such a thing.

I pulled a lot of those kinds of books from my dads bookshelf back then, big fan of airport fiction that man

Sanford
Jun 30, 2007

...and rarely post!



Hereís the vaguest of vague memories.

- kids novel, I got it about 1990 and it was, I think, new
- book was a yellowish colour, like old fashioned writing paper
- on the front was a blue & yellow macaw sitting on a stack of boxes tied up with string
- I think it was about travelling or a special journey to possibly South America
- probably set in a time when ďexplorerĒ was a good job choice for a strapping British lad
- map or a globe featured prominently, maybe pictured on the cover or first few pages
- it wasnít The Talking Parcel, I donít think it was that fantastical
- it was rubbish. First book I ever read that I didnít finish, and a real revelation that I needed to be selective and couldnít read every book, and had the freedom to stop reading one I wasnít enjoying. Thatís the only reason I still remember it!

Edit: the book might have been named after the parrot and the story, or at least part of it, may well have been told by the parrot.

Sanford fucked around with this message at 16:01 on Jan 25, 2021

Sham bam bamina!
Nov 6, 2012

ƨtupid cat




Eudora Welty's (?!) The Shoe Bird seems to fit. It doesn't look like it involves travel at all, but the cover matches the description, and, evidently, so does the quality.

quote:

The Shoe Bird is a 1964 children's novel by Southern writer Eudora Welty. The novel tells the story of a Parrot in a shoe store, as he talks to other birds about shoes.[1] Welty, who had never written any children's literature before, wrote it to satisfy a contractual obligation with her publisher Harcourt Brace and to pay for a new roof on her house.[2]

An orchestral ballet was composed by Lehman Engel and performed by the Jackson Ballet Guild in 1968.[2] A 2002 choral piece was also commissioned by the Mississippi Boy Choir and composed by composer Samuel Jones.[3]

Reception [edit]
Reception of the novel was mixed, with critic Nancy Hardgrove calling most reviews in major publications "cordial but restrained".[4] However, reception amongst children's literature commentators was largely negative.[2] Kirkus Reviews described the novel as uneventful: "Practically no action occurs during the lengthy discussion, which consists almost entirely of a stream of witticisms, many of which are irrelevant."[1] The review concludes wryly "the overly wordy result is so obscure that readers are likely to want to leave dictionaries as well as shoes to the birds."[1]

Sanford
Jun 30, 2007

...and rarely post!



Hah good shout but I donít think thatís it. A more cartoony cover and the more I think of it, the more I think there was a map or globe in the cover art. Good effort though, now I want to read The Shoe Bird.

Z the IVth
Jan 28, 2009

The trouble with your "expendable machines"

Fun Shoe

Trying to find a novel/novella length sci-fi story that I read years ago on a forum. I think it might have been Stardestroyer.net?

Gist of the story is a near future sci-fi interplanetary war in the Solar System. Ends with the Earth being glassed and the survivors fleeing on a colony ship. Very Starlancer vibe. Specific details I recall were the Europeans being nicknamed "Yurps" and one of the main characters dying of radiation poisoning at the end.

verbal enema
May 23, 2009

only marfans dot com


This was i think a polish book translated to English. I think it took place in the late 60s early 70s and some guy gets at this goverment facility that is FULL of spies. Everyone is spying on everyone there for eachother and their bosses but also for their personal enemies and blah blah. The main character is understandably completely confused as he's just bounced around this place.

help

Take the plunge! Okay!
Feb 24, 2007




verbal enema posted:

This was i think a polish book translated to English. I think it took place in the late 60s early 70s and some guy gets at this goverment facility that is FULL of spies. Everyone is spying on everyone there for eachother and their bosses but also for their personal enemies and blah blah. The main character is understandably completely confused as he's just bounced around this place.

help

It's Lem. Memoirs Found in a Bathtub

verbal enema
May 23, 2009

only marfans dot com


Take the plunge! Okay! posted:

It's Lem. Memoirs Found in a Bathtub

AHHHHHH YES thanks goon

coathat
May 21, 2007



I'm looking for a YA Christian Scifi book I read around 2000. It was set after a nuclear war with a kid or kids waking up form some sort of cryogenic sleep. Hes helped by a group of mutants, I think there was a giant and a pair of dwarf twins that had to stay physically close together or else they'd get sick and die. They ended up going to some desert mountains with maybe bird people.

Thanks.

wizzardstaff
Apr 6, 2018




coathat posted:

I'm looking for a YA Christian Scifi book I read around 2000. It was set after a nuclear war with a kid or kids waking up form some sort of cryogenic sleep. Hes helped by a group of mutants, I think there was a giant and a pair of dwarf twins that had to stay physically close together or else they'd get sick and die. They ended up going to some desert mountains with maybe bird people.

Thanks.

I haven't read it but I believe this is the Seven Sleepers series by Gilbert Morris. Google Books has a hit on a passage about "Gemini Twins" who are dwarves with opposite personalities that have to stay together.

coathat
May 21, 2007



Thank you! That was exactly it!

SerialKilldeer
Apr 25, 2014



A nonfiction book about human interaction with technology/AI which featured a weird anecdote about kindergarten kids holding a funeral for a "dead" Furby.

Carthag Tuek
Oct 15, 2005

Tider skal komme,
tider skal henrulle,
slśgt skal fÝlge slśgters gang




SerialKilldeer posted:

A nonfiction book about human interaction with technology/AI which featured a weird anecdote about kindergarten kids holding a funeral for a "dead" Furby.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sherry_Turkle maybe?

SerialKilldeer
Apr 25, 2014




Thank you, I was able to find the book (Alone Together) with that name!

DelilahFlowers
Jan 10, 2020



I'm looking fantasy book, at least 11+ years old. Black male author, setting is modern, about kids doing magic. Can't remember any specifics well, but I think the kids performed magic in a specific space where it lets them create anything they can imagine. Think they meet up with some other magic kids who explains this magic (I think this is really digging into the dearth of my memory).

Professor Shark
May 22, 2012




Looking for an id (could be an old Agatha Christie short story? I haven't been able to find it): mystery, it involves a man living in an apartment that uses gas for the lights who has repeatedly woken up to find his rooms filled with gas. It is not the fault of the equipment and it turns out that someone on a lower floor is blowing into the gas tubing that runs through a supply closet, extinguishing the light in the man's apartment. The detective works this all out... I think that a flag pole is involved somehow to check to see if the man is asleep?

Gats Akimbo
May 28, 2007

Ignoring this post


Professor Shark posted:

Looking for an id (could be an old Agatha Christie short story? I haven't been able to find it): mystery, it involves a man living in an apartment that uses gas for the lights who has repeatedly woken up to find his rooms filled with gas. It is not the fault of the equipment and it turns out that someone on a lower floor is blowing into the gas tubing that runs through a supply closet, extinguishing the light in the man's apartment. The detective works this all out... I think that a flag pole is involved somehow to check to see if the man is asleep?

But of a long shot, but maybe The Ghost at Massingham Mansions from The Eyes of Max Carrados? (http://gutenberg.net.au/ebooks13/1302121h.html)

It's lights showing and the bath filling in an empty apartment, though, though it is solved by blowing through the gas tubing (and using a pump to pump back the water, which busts the ceiling above an unfortunate tenant who's sleeping in the bath).

Professor Shark
May 22, 2012




Gats Akimbo posted:

But of a long shot, but maybe The Ghost at Massingham Mansions from The Eyes of Max Carrados? (http://gutenberg.net.au/ebooks13/1302121h.html)

It's lights showing and the bath filling in an empty apartment, though, though it is solved by blowing through the gas tubing (and using a pump to pump back the water, which busts the ceiling above an unfortunate tenant who's sleeping in the bath).

This is entirely possible- as soon as I saw Max Carrados I realized that this story was a radio adaptation and could have been from the "The Rivals of Sherlock Holmes" series that I listened to. I will check it out and get back to you!

Professor Shark
May 22, 2012




Aha! While you may not have been luminous, Gats Akimbo, you are a conductor of light! It was "The Mystery of the Scarlet Thread" by Jacques Futrelle, who's Augustus S. F. X. was featured in The Rivals of Sherlock Holmes.

Gats Akimbo
May 28, 2007

Ignoring this post


Aha!

Splicer
Oct 16, 2006

from hell's heart I stab at thee

Sweevo
Nov 8, 2007




This is kinda vague, but I read a kids book in around 1990 that scared the poo poo out of me. It had a group of kids whose hangout spot was a tree on a hill which grew horizontally because of the wind. Underneath the hill are some old tunnels (maybe a mine maybe secret ww2 tunnels, I forget). Some bullies goad one of the kids into going into the tunnels and the bulk of the book is him feeling his way around in the pitch darkness and getting creeped out/possibly seeing a ghost.

Sweevo fucked around with this message at 23:15 on Feb 22, 2021

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Nathilus
Apr 4, 2002

I alone can see through the media bias.

I'm also stupid on a scale that can only be measured in Reddits.

This has been driving me crazy. I hate my lovely memory.

A sci fi story about a bunch of kids on a starship. They are wandering the universe out for revenge against the unknown aliens that blew up earth with help from a confederation of other species who have had their home planets blown up. These aliens are the ones who built the ship and sent the children on their journey, under the ethical presumption that they are the ones who have the right to consider whether or not to xenocide the naughty aliens.

I believe this is the second book in a trilogy btw, with the first leading up to the destruction of earth and involving contact with the friendly alien confederation who are willing to save a portion of humanity from the catastrophe. And the third book being about the humans who were saved and their experiences in the period after the children on the revenge ship crew had departed. Relativity being what it is, this happens long after the subjective timeline of what the kids are going through in book 2.

Anyway more details about the specific book: the leader of the kids changes every subjective year IIRC and they're called The Pan, as in peter pan.There's a humanoid interface on the ship the kids call Mother I think, though it only intervenes with the kids in very specific circumstances for ethical reasons.

The kids eventually find a conglomeration of alien species that might have been the ones who destroyed earf. But it's intentionally unclear until after the climax whether it's true or not.

One of the big themes is about how very advanced species might rely on interstellar camoflage as their primary defense. The particular aliens the kids find have multiple layers of it going on, from intentionally making themselves VERY hard to find when looking into their system from the outside to not being exactly what they seem when they actually come into contact with other species.

EDIT: Go figure. Shortly after I posted this I finally google-fu'd enough specific phrases to get an answer: Anvil of Stars, of the Forge of God series. By Greg Bear. Which explains how I came across it, I love Greg Bear.

Nathilus fucked around with this message at 11:45 on Feb 28, 2021

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