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Beer4TheBeerGod
Aug 23, 2004

"I'm cisgender heterosexual white American male.

Fuck you for telling me what "my part" is."

- B4TBG on why they can't be criticized by minorities for being wrong because


Exciting Lemon

Zionist_en_fuego posted:

I'm not in america, but could you link me to that chart, i cant seem to find it. Did the poster come out well? What paper did you print it on?

They were printed on photo paper, and the poster came out perfectly. The website is here: http://www.ritzpix.com/net/OrderPrints/

I can't remember where the chart was on the website, I think you had to upload pictures first. You could always call them, or look for a local equivalent. Places with printing services should be able to do it.

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Zionist_en_fuego
Jul 8, 2004

ونحن سرقوا الفلافل

Awesome, i found just what I was looking for...

thanks a ton. I'll post pics of the end result.

Powdered Toast Man
Jan 25, 2005

TOAST-A-RIFIC!!!

For those that want it:

I have registered a #DIY channel on irc.synirc.net. You will see me in there as the channel owner, JonTheExecutor (my older forums name).

Come, and let us discuss voiding warranties, hardware hacking, DIY renovations and construction, and engage in general merriment.

Sufficiently skilled individuals who don't act like idiots will be made operators.

Cheesemaster200
Feb 11, 2004

Guard of the Citadel

I have a question about more "macro" home-improvement.

I would like to build a so-called roof deck on my rowhome in Baltimore City.
I have been looking on the Baltimore Permit site:
http://www.baltimorehousing.org/index/permits.asp
and a few of the documents seem to indicate that to do such an addition, I would need to get a licensed contractor to do the work.
Now, I understand if there needs to be an engineer stamping and signing off on such things, but generally is it the case that you need to get a professional to do home improvement? Seems kind of funny to me, given all the do-it-yourself stuff which is flaunted so much in society. Ideally I would like to do this myself, or at least most of it.

Obviously codes will be different from place to place, but if someone has some experience with a matter such as this it would be great!
Thanks

Cheesemaster200 fucked around with this message at 03:08 on Jan 9, 2008

what is this
Sep 11, 2001

it is a lemur


Zionist_en_fuego posted:

Graphic Designers or Photographers Help me make my apartment not suck!

Hi all, i've decided to do something about the vast emptiness on the walls throughout my apartment and print up some cool home-made posters. I'm going for the uber-cliched collage/mosaic look...



I'm trying to browse google for cool source material, as well as some photos I have lying around. Problem is, i don't know what resolution i'm gonna need for medium-large size posters (11x17ish). The highest res poo poo i found on google (which is also the coolest, just GIS "wallpaper widthtXheight") maxes out around 2500x3000. Is that too small for an 11x17 poster?

What resolution or image formats should I be working with? How much could I expect to pay to print about 9 or 10 posters on quality paper and have them framed?

11x17 will be OK at 7MP.


The best looking thing, however, would be to take the picture you have, scale it up, possibly play with it in photoshop to remove artifacting, break it up into four smaller pictures, and have it professionally printed on canvas, and mounted, etc.

what is this
Sep 11, 2001

it is a lemur


also, if you need a big image and you have only a small image, livetracing it in illustrator can be a quick way to get a stylized vector image, and photoshop has various "hipster" filters like halftone pattern which can make things look stylized but otherwise fine when blown up.

Dads
Dec 14, 2007


Zionist_en_fuego posted:

I'm trying to browse google for cool source material, as well as some photos I have lying around. Problem is, i don't know what resolution i'm gonna need for medium-large size posters (11x17ish). The highest res poo poo i found on google (which is also the coolest, just GIS "wallpaper widthtXheight") maxes out around 2500x3000. Is that too small for an 11x17 poster?

What resolution or image formats should I be working with? How much could I expect to pay to print about 9 or 10 posters on quality paper and have them framed?

Going along with what the Ritz fellow said, quality and price will largely depend on what is available to you locally. Any way you cut it, it's not going to be cheap. For example, for the non-franchaise photo/print shop I printed for we charged $12.50/sq ft for printing on good, archival quality paper (up to 33" wide). A cheap glass frame PLUS mounting job for, say, an 12x16 would run at least $30, realistically more like $60. I don't know if these rates are comparable to what is local to you, or really anywhere else for that matter.

If you want these prints to be recognizable from anywhere closer than 7' away they should be at least 150dpi, preferrably 300 or more (depending on the quality of print shop/equipment that prints your poster). If you have a print shop with skilled technicians (or at least stupid technicians with the right software), you can get by with less.

You confuse me. On one hand, you seem like youre trying to set up a real quality piece, on the other hand, you're GIS'ing what you plan on framing? With the warning that the prices I estimated may be atypical, you should still realistically balance how much quality/complexity you want versus how much money you will spend. And if you plan on busting a nice wad of cash on this, your raw material would be much more valuable coming from somewhere other than GIS. (deeeeeper quaaaiidd, digggg deeeepppahhh)

plasticus
Aug 23, 2007


Carpet & Carpet Padding

Alright, short version of the project is that I'm finishing a room in my basement with some buddies, starting this weekend. I'm a complete rookie when it comes to home improvement. One of my friends is an electrician, and the other has done a fair amount of drywalling and plumbing.

I was pulling up the carpet last night, and the pad underneath was in pretty good condition. The carpet had been laid using pin strips (?) and a carpet stretcher. However, I just bought new carpet (pretty cheap stuff) that has a pad attached to it. So should I just double up on the pads? I think that having two pads would make it seem more comfortable, but I won't do it at the expense of having wavy carpet.

If I do use both pads, should I change the way I install it? My plan was to just tape down the new stuff to the concrete floor. If it makes a difference, the old pad appears to be a synthetic fiber(it's black, you can see the individual fibers if you look closely, and it has a ridged/wavy pattern), and the new carpet has a rubber backing. Can I tape the old pad to the concrete floor, then tape the new carpet & pad to the old pad underneath? Would a glue work better in this case?

Thanks for any advice in advance!

Sapper
Mar 8, 2003




Dinosaur Gum

plasticus posted:

Carpet & Carpet Padding
If I do use both pads, should I change the way I install it? My plan was to just tape down the new stuff to the concrete floor. If it makes a difference, the old pad appears to be a synthetic fiber(it's black, you can see the individual fibers if you look closely, and it has a ridged/wavy pattern), and the new carpet has a rubber backing. Can I tape the old pad to the concrete floor, then tape the new carpet & pad to the old pad underneath? Would a glue work better in this case?

Oh God, don't tape the carpet down. It'll just yank up in a heartbeat. Get yourself a cheap knee kicker, or even rent or borrow one, and reuse the existing tackless strips if they're not too beaten up.

Since the padding is already attached to the carpet, you should remove the old pad, otherwise the floor will feel "soggy" from having too much padding underneath, like walking in mud.

Definitely don't tape the carpet down. I looked it up, and gluing is okay, although I don't have much faith in the pad part holding up will If that's what you go with, take everything up, and you'll have to clean the concrete using a mop, hot water, and muriatic acid to neutralize the alkali salts that can weep out of the concrete over time due to moisture. Otherwise the glue won't hold very well, and moisture will condense on the concrete and ruin the floor very quickly.

Edited as I google up more information, my experience with concrete is limited to wood floors and tile.

Sapper fucked around with this message at 16:24 on Jan 9, 2008

RobertKerans
Aug 25, 2006

There is a heppy lend
Fur, fur aw-a-a-ay.

Blowupologist posted:

So you have a wall switch that turns your oven on and off? What about the switch controlling the burner itself?

No, the dial controlling the specific hob doesn't matter, the element just comes on every time I turn the power on to the entire oven.

Zionist_en_fuego
Jul 8, 2004

ونحن سرقوا الفلافل

Dads posted:

You confuse me. On one hand, you seem like youre trying to set up a real quality piece, on the other hand, you're GIS'ing what you plan on framing? With the warning that the prices I estimated may be atypical, you should still realistically balance how much quality/complexity you want versus how much money you will spend. And if you plan on busting a nice wad of cash on this, your raw material would be much more valuable coming from somewhere other than GIS. (deeeeeper quaaaiidd, digggg deeeepppahhh)

The truth lies somewhere in the middle. On the one hand, i underestimated the costs involved, especially because I've decided to print things on canvas. On the other hand, GIS is an amazing resource for really really cool images which would make great posters (like the macOS blades of grass wallpaper for the bathroom etc...). - And i'm not looking for "real quality", just nicer than the "what i learned in college..." type posters my old flatmate used to have.

I think in order to save some money, i'm going to abandon the segmented photo idea, and just go with a 'theme' of multiple posters. I have images that are 2500x1650 (jpg) which I feel is a little on the small side but they look so drat cooooool. I should be looking for files in the 4000x3000 range and up, right?

Thanks by the way for the great responses, if I go through with this project, do you think it would warrant it's own thread? Or an interior design megathread perhaps?

Zionist_en_fuego fucked around with this message at 17:58 on Jan 9, 2008

Beer4TheBeerGod
Aug 23, 2004

"I'm cisgender heterosexual white American male.

Fuck you for telling me what "my part" is."

- B4TBG on why they can't be criticized by minorities for being wrong because


Exciting Lemon

RobertKerans posted:

No, the dial controlling the specific hob doesn't matter, the element just comes on every time I turn the power on to the entire oven.

Sounds to me like a problem with the switch then, especially if the other burners function properly.

Happiness Commando
Feb 1, 2002
$$ joy at gunpoint $$



Where can I buy clear paint? I want to mix it with phosphorescent powder and paint some crazy poo poo on my bedroom walls

Beer4TheBeerGod
Aug 23, 2004

"I'm cisgender heterosexual white American male.

Fuck you for telling me what "my part" is."

- B4TBG on why they can't be criticized by minorities for being wrong because


Exciting Lemon

IfIWereARichMan posted:

Where can I buy clear paint? I want to mix it with phosphorescent powder and paint some crazy poo poo on my bedroom walls

My understanding is that Future Floor Finish is a clear acrylic compound. I use it when painting my miniatures.

PipeRifle
Oct 4, 2004

we have catte



plasticus posted:

Carpet & Carpet Padding

Alright, short version of the project is that I'm finishing a room in my basement with some buddies, starting this weekend. I'm a complete rookie when it comes to home improvement. One of my friends is an electrician, and the other has done a fair amount of drywalling and plumbing.

I was pulling up the carpet last night, and the pad underneath was in pretty good condition. The carpet had been laid using pin strips (?) and a carpet stretcher. However, I just bought new carpet (pretty cheap stuff) that has a pad attached to it. So should I just double up on the pads? I think that having two pads would make it seem more comfortable, but I won't do it at the expense of having wavy carpet.

If I do use both pads, should I change the way I install it? My plan was to just tape down the new stuff to the concrete floor. If it makes a difference, the old pad appears to be a synthetic fiber(it's black, you can see the individual fibers if you look closely, and it has a ridged/wavy pattern), and the new carpet has a rubber backing. Can I tape the old pad to the concrete floor, then tape the new carpet & pad to the old pad underneath? Would a glue work better in this case?

Thanks for any advice in advance!

I used to work for a carpet installer, and I can also verify that taping is a really bad way to go. I'm not familiar with the type of carpet you're using (padding attached AND a rubber backing?) but it doesn't sound like it would stretch very well if it's all put together already.

Go with glue: any carpet sales warehouse should tell you how and which glue to get, since they probably sell it themselves at jacked-up prices. Look around after that. In my experience it was laid on with a trowel like any linoleum glue or Spackle. If you want it to look really nice I'd invest in a rental roller, which is basically a mini-steamroller (a heavy as gently caress metal cylinder attached to a handle) to roll out any bulges or weird spots.

If you could possibly link me to the type of carpet you got, too, that might help me make a diagnosis. If you've already got tack strip down on concrete, I'd personally consider buying stretchable carpet and using the old pad, as getting tack strip into concrete is a bitch and a half if you decide to do it later.

ForeverFlashlight
Jun 14, 2005
Keeps going and going...

To the guy looking to fill up his walls, Google search "Rasterbator" It's pretty much perfect for getting large art onto walls with the bonus of built-in hipster filtering.

Sapper
Mar 8, 2003




Dinosaur Gum

Blowupologist posted:

Sounds to me like a problem with the switch then, especially if the other burners function properly.

Probably a bad potentiometer in the dial, allowing the circuit to be closed all the time. You can probably get a replacement pretty easily, and if you're lucky the wires will be screw mounted on it, not soldered. Either way, you'll have to pull the instrument panel for the stove apart, which shouldn't be too difficult.

You may even be really lucky (so to speak...) and just have something shorting across the in-out wires on the dial. If you turn the knob for that burner, does it change the temperature any? If not, either the whole dial is shot, or there's a short. A short could easily cause a fire.

plasticus
Aug 23, 2007


PipeRifle posted:

Words

Based on some stuff Sapper said, I talked to my guys that are helping me out last night. Despite tape working well for one of them in his basement, we're going to try out gluing this carpet down, and we're going to get rid of the old pad. I actually like the feel of the new carpet WITH the old pad (I walked on it with carpet samples), but attaching one pad to another pad to the cement floor sounds shady the more I read responses here.

To try to further explain the carpet I bought... the rubber backing IS the pad. Like I said, I'm no expert here. Perhaps when most people say pad, they're specifically talking about a separate foam pad. I don't know. But this carpet has a 3/8" rubber back, which to me is a pad. Please tell me if I'm misinformed on this -- I'd like to have my lingo correct! It's cheap stuff, and I assume it's there for both cushioning, and it feels like it's supposed to be non-slip so you could conceivably just throw it down in a low-traffic area if you didn't care about quality. I also know that this stuff won't stretch well at all -- or that's what I've been told by a few guys who know more than I do -- so I do not think that stretching is an option.

In retrospect, had I known the pad still there was in good shape, I probably would have gotten a nicer carpet without the rubber backing and re-used the pad. Oh well, I'll work with what I've got. Thanks to you guys that have replied.

RobertKerans
Aug 25, 2006

There is a heppy lend
Fur, fur aw-a-a-ay.

Sapper posted:

Probably a bad potentiometer in the dial, allowing the circuit to be closed all the time. You can probably get a replacement pretty easily, and if you're lucky the wires will be screw mounted on it, not soldered. Either way, you'll have to pull the instrument panel for the stove apart, which shouldn't be too difficult.

You may even be really lucky (so to speak...) and just have something shorting across the in-out wires on the dial. If you turn the knob for that burner, does it change the temperature any? If not, either the whole dial is shot, or there's a short. A short could easily cause a fire.

Thanks, I'll have a fiddle around with it today and find out. The temperature doesn't seem to change, but I'll find out for sure then.

Sound Mr. Brown
Feb 21, 2005

The love of learning, the sequestered nooks,
And all the sweet serenity of books.

Quick question: what is the technical name for sliding doors? "Cavity sliding doors" seems to be what they call them in Commonwealth countries, but I can't get any links on US websites. Wondering if it's something I'll have to rig myself or if there are any dealers offering solutions. I don't want "French doors" or "removable walls" or "sliding glass doors" or other large patio installments.

More detail: I am thinking about a front door that slides into the wall on a rail and runners rather than swinging open in order to maximize space in a very small area. Needs to be lockable, weatherproofed, and heavy duty enough to serve as a replacement to a regular front door. They have them everywhere in Japan so I know someone has got to be making them in the States, but no luck yet. Help!

ail
Jul 8, 2003

by The Finn


I'm working on my bathroom.

What is the secret to getting a clean, solid paint line on a 45 degree meeting point where the two meeting walls are a different color? I have that weird bumpy spatter texture on my sheetrock (common in California) which makes getting a clean line harder. Just taping it off?

What is the secret to getting really accurate measurements? I'm replacing baseboards and installing a mid-high wall moulding and need precise measurements to guarantee accurate joints.

jwx10
Apr 8, 2003

by Tiny Fistpump


ail posted:

I'm working on my bathroom.

What is the secret to getting a clean, solid paint line on a 45 degree meeting point where the two meeting walls are a different color? I have that weird bumpy spatter texture on my sheetrock (common in California) which makes getting a clean line harder. Just taping it off?

What is the secret to getting really accurate measurements? I'm replacing baseboards and installing a mid-high wall moulding and need precise measurements to guarantee accurate joints.

In my experience with getting a good paint line is to take your time applying the tape and then take a clear caulk that can be painted and apply to the side of the tape that you are painting. I use a dab on my finger and then run along the tape. After the caulking dries (quick because it should be a thin amount) you are free to paint.

When you remove the tape after this prep work you will have a perfectly straight line. It takes some time to position the tape but the crisp lines are worth it.

Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



Sound Mr. Brown posted:

Quick question: what is the technical name for sliding doors? "Cavity sliding doors" seems to be what they call them in Commonwealth countries, but I can't get any links on US websites. Wondering if it's something I'll have to rig myself or if there are any dealers offering solutions. I don't want "French doors" or "removable walls" or "sliding glass doors" or other large patio installments.

More detail: I am thinking about a front door that slides into the wall on a rail and runners rather than swinging open in order to maximize space in a very small area. Needs to be lockable, weatherproofed, and heavy duty enough to serve as a replacement to a regular front door. They have them everywhere in Japan so I know someone has got to be making them in the States, but no luck yet. Help!

They are called "Pocket Doors".

Sound Mr. Brown
Feb 21, 2005

The love of learning, the sequestered nooks,
And all the sweet serenity of books.

Thumposaurus posted:

They are called "Pocket Doors".

Aaagggh thank you so much! That is it exactly.

pass the butter
Mar 22, 2006

OH MY GOD


Not sure if this applies, but...

I got a new watch for christmas. It is an auto winder, and it runs out of springy power if I don't wind it every morning.

I know there are auto watch winding cases out there, but, I am a woodworker, I would be much happier building my own box for it - but I need the guts that slowly spins the watch around. I can't seem to find a good source for odd parts like that. Anyone have any leads on something of that nature?

The new watch is a skeleton style, which means you can see all the gears cruising around. So I intend to build a box in a similar fashion.

Ambrose Burnside
Aug 29, 2007

pensive


How can I affix brass to painted aluminum? It'll be a rather small and detailed logo, and I want it to eventually be removable without having to get in there with a chisel.

Beer4TheBeerGod
Aug 23, 2004

"I'm cisgender heterosexual white American male.

Fuck you for telling me what "my part" is."

- B4TBG on why they can't be criticized by minorities for being wrong because


Exciting Lemon

Ambrose Burnside posted:

How can I affix brass to painted aluminum? It'll be a rather small and detailed logo, and I want it to eventually be removable without having to get in there with a chisel.

Is it something that will be moved a lot, or subject to a fair amount of stress? If not, you could use double-sided tape. A drop of superglue would also work, although there's no guarantee it wouldn't peel the paint.

Basically any low-grade adhesive will work. Silicone RTV, superglue, etc. Just be sparing with your adhesive.

Ambrose Burnside
Aug 29, 2007

pensive


Blowupologist posted:

Is it something that will be moved a lot, or subject to a fair amount of stress? If not, you could use double-sided tape. A drop of superglue would also work, although there's no guarantee it wouldn't peel the paint.

Basically any low-grade adhesive will work. Silicone RTV, superglue, etc. Just be sparing with your adhesive.

It'll be taking a lot of abuse (as in, it'll be grafted to the side of a paintball gun I'll be hefting through brambles and covering in mud), but I might want to remove it later, too. I was hoping for something you could easily remove with solvent.

Oh well... if it might damage the paint, I'll just attach them to a removable/replacable bit, like a barrel.
Just a Warhammer 40K pet project of sorts- I want to add brass aquilas-

like that, but smaller-

Onto the body or barrel of this-


A lot of people add stupid paintball company stickers and stuff like that to their markers, and I was going for something different but still cool.

MidasAg
Oct 28, 2007
The Man of Silver

OK, I just installed a new Price Pfister Classic 3 or 4 hole faucet in my kitchen sink. It works great, but the sprayer doesnt work. It appears that there is some water in the tube, but it wont spray. I bought an identical faucet to replace parts, but I'm not looking forward to that. Is it possible that I just have lovely water pressure, and it wont work, or do I just need to suck it up, and start replacing it?
Thanks

Beer4TheBeerGod
Aug 23, 2004

"I'm cisgender heterosexual white American male.

Fuck you for telling me what "my part" is."

- B4TBG on why they can't be criticized by minorities for being wrong because


Exciting Lemon

Ambrose Burnside posted:

It'll be taking a lot of abuse (as in, it'll be grafted to the side of a paintball gun I'll be hefting through brambles and covering in mud), but I might want to remove it later, too. I was hoping for something you could easily remove with solvent.

Oh well... if it might damage the paint, I'll just attach them to a removable/replacable bit, like a barrel.
Just a Warhammer 40K pet project of sorts- I want to add brass aquilas-

like that, but smaller-

Onto the body or barrel of this-


A lot of people add stupid paintball company stickers and stuff like that to their markers, and I was going for something different but still cool.

Well you have a couple of challenges ahead of you. For starters you'll probably want to bend the brass piece around a wooden dowel that's the same diameter as the barrel. That way you can ensure the piece stays flush with the barrel.

As far as actually adhering it is concerned, I can't think of a way to adhere it that will later be easily removed. You could try superglue and then later use acetone, but the solvent may damage the paint as well. Personally I would just accept that my barrel is going to permanently be property of the Emperor and use epoxy.

Sapper
Mar 8, 2003




Dinosaur Gum

Flyboy925 posted:

OK, I just installed a new Price Pfister Classic 3 or 4 hole faucet in my kitchen sink. It works great, but the sprayer doesnt work. It appears that there is some water in the tube, but it wont spray. I bought an identical faucet to replace parts, but I'm not looking forward to that. Is it possible that I just have lovely water pressure, and it wont work, or do I just need to suck it up, and start replacing it?
Thanks

Open up both hot and cold full bore, and then try spraying. If it still doesn't work, take the sprayer off the end of the hose and see if water comes out at a good pressure. The sprayer itself is most likely the hosed part.

theparag0n
May 4, 2007

INITIATE STANDING FLIRTATION PROTOCOL beep boop

Grimey Drawer

Ambrose Burnside posted:

Oh well... if it might damage the paint, I'll just attach them to a removable/replacable bit, like a barrel.
Just a Warhammer 40K pet project of sorts- I want to add brass aquilas-

like that, but smaller-

Onto the body or barrel of this-


A lot of people add stupid paintball company stickers and stuff like that to their markers, and I was going for something different but still cool.

Double sided tape can stick stuff pretty strongly as long as you use enough of it and it sits flat enough.

MidasAg
Oct 28, 2007
The Man of Silver

Sapper posted:

Open up both hot and cold full bore, and then try spraying. If it still doesn't work, take the sprayer off the end of the hose and see if water comes out at a good pressure. The sprayer itself is most likely the hosed part.

When I looked at the new replacement faucet mixer, and the tags were backwards. I switched the faucet and sprayer nozzles, and it works now. Thanks for the input though

Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



3M makes a double sided tape that is used for sticking molding and emblems onto cars it is about as thick as scotch tape and super strong. You should be able to find it at an auto parts store.

Ambrose Burnside
Aug 29, 2007

pensive


Thumposaurus posted:

3M makes a double sided tape that is used for sticking molding and emblems onto cars it is about as thick as scotch tape and super strong. You should be able to find it at an auto parts store.

If it works for cars it'll probably work for me- thanks. If I like it I'll probably glue them on anyways, but it's good to know a viable removable alternative.

Deacon of Delicious
Aug 20, 2007

I bet the twist ending is Dracula's dick-babies


I need suggestions for getting around not having a router. I'll have a rectangular hole in a piece of wood, and I need to make recessions on two of the sides for a mounting plate. The recessions need to be about 2"x1/2"x1/3". I don't have a router and I don't know anyone who does, and all I need are these two little recessions. The only thing I can think of is carefully using a sanding block or a file. Anyone have any ideas?

monkeybounce
Feb 9, 2007


Deacon of Delicious posted:

I need suggestions for getting around not having a router. I'll have a rectangular hole in a piece of wood, and I need to make recessions on two of the sides for a mounting plate. The recessions need to be about 2"x1/2"x1/3". I don't have a router and I don't know anyone who does, and all I need are these two little recessions. The only thing I can think of is carefully using a sanding block or a file. Anyone have any ideas?

I'm a little confused, but I think what you're saying is you have a hole in wood and need to notch it out another 2"?

If that's the case, you can use a jig saw to knock out the notches.

Kind of like this:
Linked since no longer helpful to the poster, but maybe to someone

It may take some sanding out and a steady hand, but it should work for you.

monkeybounce fucked around with this message at 17:10 on Jan 19, 2008

Deacon of Delicious
Aug 20, 2007

I bet the twist ending is Dracula's dick-babies


Sorry, I could have been clearer. Here's a crappy MSPaint to illustrate:


I have a piece of wood with a hole like in the top picture. I want to route away some of the wood in the red area in the middle picture so it would like the bottom picture from the side. It's sad because I know the correct answer is "Use a router. Doofus." But that's not an option for me.

Beer4TheBeerGod
Aug 23, 2004

"I'm cisgender heterosexual white American male.

Fuck you for telling me what "my part" is."

- B4TBG on why they can't be criticized by minorities for being wrong because


Exciting Lemon

Deacon of Delicious posted:

I have a piece of wood with a hole like in the top picture. I want to route away some of the wood in the red area in the middle picture so it would like the bottom picture from the side. It's sad because I know the correct answer is "Use a router. Doofus." But that's not an option for me.

I'm not sure if there's a reasonable way to do that without a router. Is it necessary that they be a single, solid piece? Depending on the application you could look at cutting out the whole area, and then nailing or gluing in a couple strips of wood.

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Death Pants
Aug 6, 2003

It took me 4 years to hit the HOT Tag

well the hits just keep on coming. While doing laundry tonight my electric dryer decided it no longer wanted to dry the clothes but rather just tumble them around for an hour or so. When I asked the dryer if it was still under warranty it laughed and then threw a sock at me. As happy as I was to have the missing sock back, I'm still upset that it no longer wants to do it's job.

So how hard is it to diagnose and fix these things and or would it just be better to suck it up, get a payday advance and call a repair man.

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