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Deadite
Aug 30, 2003

A fat guy, a watermelon, and a stack of magazines?
Family.


Yeah I know, but itís really a room that only I ever go into so no one will see my secret shame.

Iím not going to defend the color, I know it would be crazy

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Subjunctive
Sep 12, 2006

careful now


Cybernetic Crumb

Deadite posted:

I was going to paint a room that color

Love it.

Final Blog Entry
Jun 23, 2006

"Love us with money or we'll hate you with hammers!"

Deadite posted:

I was going to paint a room that color so this is disappointing, but it does explain why none of the big paint brands have bright colors available

The bright greens on the paint companies color charts are going to be way brighter and more vibrant on the wall than you think by looking at a swatch. I have seen many a customer pick what they think is a "soft" yellow or green or what ever and then get it on their walls and go OH gently caress WHAT HAVE I DONE

Your brain interprets 2 square inches a lot different than it does 400 square feet of walls

Final Blog Entry fucked around with this message at 14:19 on May 23, 2020

The Dave
Sep 9, 2003



Yeah itís one thing to have a bright green room. My gyms colors are black and neon green and theyíre main walk is painted to match.

But I honestly think you would start to get physically sick if you figured out how to get something that bright on walls.

Chichevache
Feb 16, 2010

One of the funniest posters in GIP.

Just not intentionally.


You can't fix bad taste.

mutata
Mar 1, 2003

You walk in with the Turnips, you leave with the Bells.



I wonder if there's a company that's made a "greenest green" paint the way there's hyperbright magenta or vantablack or whatever.

Like this: https://youtu.be/_NzVmtbPOrM

H110Hawk
Dec 28, 2006


Green screen green is probably available and close to what you have in mind. It's super high saturation and brightness. I would be wary of anything above 1 step off matte for sheen. Make sure to get a good primer coat on there and take your time on the tinted coat. It will likely need twice as much as you think it will. What color light is going into the room? Can we see a picture?

Deadite
Aug 30, 2003

A fat guy, a watermelon, and a stack of magazines?
Family.


The Dave posted:

Yeah itís one thing to have a bright green room. My gyms colors are black and neon green and theyíre main walk is painted to match.

But I honestly think you would start to get physically sick if you figured out how to get something that bright on walls.

I realize that this is only going to dig me in deeper, but the whole room wasnít going to be that color. One wall was reserved for a mural sized photo of the moon like this one.



The more I talk about this the more I realize my taste may be heavily influenced by Francis Dolarhydeís house in Manhunter

mutata
Mar 1, 2003

You walk in with the Turnips, you leave with the Bells.



I've certainly seen plenty of neon green spraypaints out there too. How seemingly luminant it is will depend on ambient lighting and such. There's also whatever they paint road signs with.

You should paint with a retroreflective paint of some kind like on road signs.

Personally, I'm all for you really loving UP a room neon green style.

Final Blog Entry
Jun 23, 2006

"Love us with money or we'll hate you with hammers!"

Like H110Hawk said, it's gonna take a bit of paint, those bright rear end colors don't hide for poo poo and 2 coats might be optimistic. Prime the walls gray first, it's the best base for going over with bright greens, yellows, reds, etc. A lot of paint manufacturers also have chromatic tint bases that start as yellow or red before adding colorants, if you end up with a green that can be made from a yellow tint base it will hide waaaay better than having it tinted in someone's clear/neutral/accent tint base.

H110Hawk
Dec 28, 2006


Final Blog Entry posted:

Like H110Hawk said, it's gonna take a bit of paint, those bright rear end colors don't hide for poo poo and 2 coats might be optimistic. Prime the walls gray first, it's the best base for going over with bright greens, yellows, reds, etc. A lot of paint manufacturers also have chromatic tint bases that start as yellow or red before adding colorants, if you end up with a green that can be made from a yellow tint base it will hide waaaay better than having it tinted in someone's clear/neutral/accent tint base.

Yeah it's going to be a lot of paint. I think we went through the better part of a gallon of green screen painting one 12x12 wall. That was likely due to poor priming and technique but I was in middle school. 2 coats is where you will start finding how committed you are to your scheme.

To be clear you should 100% do this and post about it. I am dying to see the outcome.

H110Hawk fucked around with this message at 15:48 on May 23, 2020

TooMuchAbstraction
Oct 14, 2012

Hubris

Fun Shoe

You might look into if there are fluorescent paints you can get (that absorb UV and re-emit as visible light). I feel like that's your best shot at getting a really bright green going.

KKKLIP ART
Sep 3, 2004



I want to talk paint. We are buying a house and all the walls in the house are the taupiest taupe that has ever existed. I keep seeing conflicting ideas on preparation and paint type. In the kitchen I know we are going to clean all the walls with TSP, but what about sanding the walls? Should I get a sanding pole and sand down all the walls? What grit should I use? Because the walls are lighter, what about priming? Any brand paint suggestions? We were thinking the Benjamin Moore Regal but are open to suggestions.

H110Hawk
Dec 28, 2006


My wife brings up: what about custom wall paper or vinyl? That gives you one coat application and guaranteed color.

Deadite
Aug 30, 2003

A fat guy, a watermelon, and a stack of magazines?
Family.


H110Hawk posted:

My wife brings up: what about custom wall paper or vinyl? That gives you one coat application and guaranteed color.

Does vinyl go on like wall paper? I guess Iím just more comfortable with paint but if I can do paper or vinyl myself then I am open to all of it

Final Blog Entry
Jun 23, 2006

"Love us with money or we'll hate you with hammers!"

KKKLIP ART posted:

I want to talk paint. We are buying a house and all the walls in the house are the taupiest taupe that has ever existed. I keep seeing conflicting ideas on preparation and paint type. In the kitchen I know we are going to clean all the walls with TSP, but what about sanding the walls? Should I get a sanding pole and sand down all the walls? What grit should I use? Because the walls are lighter, what about priming? Any brand paint suggestions? We were thinking the Benjamin Moore Regal but are open to suggestions.

The TSP should only be necesaary if any walls of the kitchen are grimy or greasy from cooking. Dont bother sanding unless the existing paint is semigloss or shinier, just make sure they're clean and dry. Even then I'd probably just wipe down with a liquid deglosser instead unless it's like high gloss. Spot prime stains or patches as needed, full prime is generally a waste of time and money on previously painted interior walls unless you're going to or from something really dark or bright or the previous owners smoked in the house. Just do two coats of topcoat even if one looks ok, it will clean and touch up easier for you later. "One Coat" paint isn't a thing IMO, regardless of what any can says. "Paint and primer in one" is also marketing bullshit that Behr started years ago and then every other manufacturer had to follow suit. Paint is paint and primer is primer, if you need a primer for adhesion, stainblocking, etc., you need to use an appropriate primer. You'll do well with any of the better products from Ben Moore or Sherwin Williams.

Edit- don't skimp on your applicators, if you're spending $40-50+ a gallon on premium paint you can afford the $6 roller cover instead of the $2 one, it makes a big difference.

Final Blog Entry fucked around with this message at 16:25 on May 23, 2020

KKKLIP ART
Sep 3, 2004



Final Blog Entry posted:

The TSP should only be necesaary if any walls of the kitchen are grimy or greasy from cooking. Dont bother sanding unless the existing paint is semigloss or shinier, just make sure they're clean and dry. Even then I'd probably just wipe down with a liquid deglosser instead unless it's like high gloss. Spot prime stains or patches as needed, full prime is generally a waste of time and money on previously painted interior walls unless you're going to or from something really dark or bright or the previous owners smoked in the house. Just do two coats of topcoat even if one looks ok, it will clean and touch up easier for you later. "One Coat" paint isn't a thing IMO, regardless of what any can says. "Paint and primer in one" is also marketing bullshit that Behr started years ago and then every other manufacturer had to follow suit. Paint is paint and primer is primer, if you need a primer for adhesion, stainblocking, etc., you need to use an appropriate primer. You'll do well with any of the better products from Ben Moore or Sherwin Williams.

Edit- don't skimp on your applicators, if you're spending $40-50+ a gallon on premium paint you can afford the $6 roller cover instead of the $2 one, it makes a big difference.

This is all good to know. Iím not sure the gloss level of the existing paint because it seems nobody has a consistent gauge on what is or isnít. Itís probably eggshell but Iíll just do a deglosser just in case.
Any specific recommendations on deglossers?

Anne Whateley
Feb 11, 2007
i like nice words


Neon has been such a trend for awhile now that you shouldn't have to do weird specialty craft paint. Sherwin-Williams has a fluorescent green. Benjamin Moore has a neon green that just needs some more white. I think it's a bad idea, obviously, but it should be attainable. Think of, like, wacky pediatricians or pediatric dentists whose offices are full of this stuff.

taqueso
Mar 8, 2004









Fun Shoe

Urethane automotive paints (ie House of Kolor) can make that color green.

FilthyImp
Sep 30, 2002

Nope



Dude's gonna pioneer an all-room digital space Twitchstream with that paint.

With the kids being around all day, our floors are taking a beating. Is there anything to put on engineered bamboo to give it some shine and scuff protection?
Everything I've read says mild soap and a little water but I'm at the point i'll be rubbing walnuts over everything to keep them from looking gross.

Final Blog Entry
Jun 23, 2006

"Love us with money or we'll hate you with hammers!"

KKKLIP ART posted:

Any specific recommendations on deglossers?

Most retailers are probably just gonna have one brand or variety that they carry so you're not likely to have options unless you're shopping around. Biggest difference is going to be is wether it's solvent- or water-based. The solvent based ones are probably more effective but then you've got the odor that goes along with it and some people are sensitive to that. I think most places have moved to just carrying water based ones anyways though. Read the instructions, most of the deglossers will say that you've got a time window within which you should paint after using it or it's not effective so don't degloss one day and paint the next. They kind of work by softening the paint so you can get a mechanical bond with the new paint, after a while the paint sets back up and you'd have to wipe the walls down again.

Deadite
Aug 30, 2003

A fat guy, a watermelon, and a stack of magazines?
Family.


Anne Whateley posted:

Neon has been such a trend for awhile now that you shouldn't have to do weird specialty craft paint. Sherwin-Williams has a fluorescent green. Benjamin Moore has a neon green that just needs some more white. I think it's a bad idea, obviously, but it should be attainable. Think of, like, wacky pediatricians or pediatric dentists whose offices are full of this stuff.

Yeah I didnít think it would be hard to find since I swear Iíve seen businesses painted with that color, but when I go look at swatches I canít find the brightness that I want. Like the poster who said his gym uses neon green, the gym must have gotten that paint from somewhere and it seems unlikely that they were making special orders just for paint.

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




Final Blog Entry posted:

The TSP should only be necesaary if any walls of the kitchen are grimy or greasy from cooking. Dont bother sanding unless the existing paint is semigloss or shinier, just make sure they're clean and dry. Even then I'd probably just wipe down with a liquid deglosser instead unless it's like high gloss. Spot prime stains or patches as needed, full prime is generally a waste of time and money on previously painted interior walls unless you're going to or from something really dark or bright or the previous owners smoked in the house. Just do two coats of topcoat even if one looks ok, it will clean and touch up easier for you later. "One Coat" paint isn't a thing IMO, regardless of what any can says. "Paint and primer in one" is also marketing bullshit that Behr started years ago and then every other manufacturer had to follow suit. Paint is paint and primer is primer, if you need a primer for adhesion, stainblocking, etc., you need to use an appropriate primer. You'll do well with any of the better products from Ben Moore or Sherwin Williams.

Edit- don't skimp on your applicators, if you're spending $40-50+ a gallon on premium paint you can afford the $6 roller cover instead of the $2 one, it makes a big difference.

You know more about paint than me but I'd like to add a few other points.

I'm not sure how much this applies to the drywalling approach of the US, but in the UK we typically do a full plaster skim coat before painting. This has two effects on painting:
1. Assuming you've let it dry properly for a few days before painting, it will absorb a lot of water, so I tend to start with a "mist coat", which is a watered down coat of whatever paint you're using for the real coats. Usually 1:10 water:paint, but it's written on the tubs. This acts as something of a primer coat, and I only use actual primers when there's specific spots that need it as you say, such as on exposed metal or stains.
2. Plasterers pride themselves on the smoothness of their finish, with a marble finish being their gold standard. This is nice and all, but I've found myself sanding down this final skim to ensure good grip, because where I've not done that the paint comes off much more easily, all layers at once, down to the plaster.

The latter speaks to something you haven't covered so much above, which is the toughness of the final finish. I don't remember where I got the advice, but I was told that the key to a really strong finish (like you can run a hand over it or knock it a bit without damage) is multiple thin coats rather than one thick coat. This is another black mark in the "one coat" paints, which my mother swears by but I don't touch.

I've also been told by Dulux (and I'm guessing this is the same for other brands) that their "consumer" lines of paint contain a lot more binder because it makes it easier to apply, at the cost of final strength and finish. They have "trade" lines with a different mix that I get on with well.

All-in tends to be 1x mist coat, then however many further full coats are required to get the coverage desired, usually 2.

Jaded Burnout fucked around with this message at 17:06 on May 23, 2020

Final Blog Entry
Jun 23, 2006

"Love us with money or we'll hate you with hammers!"

That's very interesting, and sounds like quite the process to repaint walls! I live in Florida and so deal with very few walls that are anything besides drywall with orange peel texture which comparatively seems a hell of a lot more straightforward, usually "open paint, open beer, paint walls"

Final Blog Entry fucked around with this message at 17:33 on May 23, 2020

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




Final Blog Entry posted:

That's very interesting, and sounds like quite the process to repaint walls! I live in Florida and so deal with very few walls that are anything besides drywall with orange peel texture which comparatively seems a hell of a lot more straightforward, usually "open paint, open beer, paint walls"

Honestly I'm not sure what the best practice is for repainting as I've only done new plaster, I suspect it'd be a lot closer to yours.

The "orange peel texture" thing is very american; any sort of wall texture has been considered off-trend here since before I was born.

Final Blog Entry
Jun 23, 2006

"Love us with money or we'll hate you with hammers!"

We need our orange peel here because no one knows how to drywall and it hides all the imperfections. It's laughable the finishes I've seen people call "Level 5" which would be the drywall equivalent of the flawless smooth sanded plaster over there that you mentioned

KKKLIP ART
Sep 3, 2004



I would 100% love a totally smooth finish but as stated nobody can really do drywall well here and I sure as hell cant so orange peel it is.

ntan1
Apr 29, 2009

sempai noticed me


KKKLIP ART posted:

I want to talk paint. We are buying a house and all the walls in the house are the taupiest taupe that has ever existed. I keep seeing conflicting ideas on preparation and paint type. In the kitchen I know we are going to clean all the walls with TSP, but what about sanding the walls? Should I get a sanding pole and sand down all the walls? What grit should I use? Because the walls are lighter, what about priming? Any brand paint suggestions? We were thinking the Benjamin Moore Regal but are open to suggestions.

Sanding the walls prior to putting on primer is specifically to get the drywall texture as smooth as possible, as others have indicated. You should sand the walls if you are re-applying joint compound to create a smooth texture, etc. If your current coat of paint is peeling or low quality, sanding/scraping also helps forces the old paint layer off (although this is more common for the exterior than interior).

Sanding the walls prior to the 1st/2nd coast of paint is done to help erase drip marks/roller texture when painting your walls, and to ensure paint consistency so that spots don't show up. It's somewhat important for a perfect semigloss on a perfectly smooth wall, but not as important for flat paint/texture walls.

1 coat of primer, 2 coats of paint. Use high quality paint if you are living there for a long time. People have their preferences, but I prefer Kelly Moore which is quality wise the same as Benjamin Moore, which is higher than Sherwin Williams and Behr. However, Kelly Moore is a west coast regional brand.

Use higher sheen (semigloss) for the kitchen and flat for parts outside of the kitchen, unless you particularly like the glossy look. Higher sheen tends to be more waterproof and easy to clean.

BonoMan
Feb 20, 2002


Jade Ear Joe

Ask me about the time I painted an 80 x 20 foot wall with green screen paint (which is really not cheap) and then they decided to not use it (it was for a children's TV show and they decided to use projectors outside of the set windows instead).

Turds in magma
Sep 17, 2007
can i get a transform out of here?

Maybe there's a thread on this, but any composter recommendations? Kitchen waste, garden/yard waste, and I'm in the northeast.

Hed
Mar 31, 2004



Fun Shoe

My bedroom was that green color in the house my parents bought. The previous ownersí daughter wanted it.

It was definitely a ďmy eyes are closed but I can still see my roomĒ color.

Itís going to be rad.

PainterofCrap
Oct 17, 2002

Hey bebe





Turds in magma posted:

Maybe there's a thread on this, but any composter recommendations? Kitchen waste, garden/yard waste, and I'm in the northeast.

I built my wife a horizontal drum one, out of a plastic food-grade 55-gal drum (this configuration:)



She had a bit of trouble rotating it, so it was replaced with a static one:



You could build or buy one.

Samadhi
May 12, 2001



PainterofCrap posted:

I built my wife a horizontal drum one, out of a plastic food-grade 55-gal drum (this configuration:)





I have this one at my house. It can be hard to rotate when it is full, but it works well and is very sturdy. It's made by Lifetime and I got it at Costco a couple years back. The only problem I have with it is the quality of the hardware. It's assembled by locking rounded plates together to form the drums. You then put a sheet metal band around them on both sides of each drum and tighten them with a bolt that passes through an eyelet cylinder and then screws into a threaded cylinder, pulling the ends of the bands together.

The metal they use in the bolts is very soft, so it strips very easily unless you are very careful with the tightening. You can use a powered drill to start the bolt, but you want to finish it with a hand screwdriver. The bands can/probably will loosen a bit over time, so if you strip them when you assemble it, it becomes a pain. Luckily, the company sent me a free set of hardware free of charge when I contacted them and it has held up amazingly well otherwise.

Samadhi
May 12, 2001



Does anyone have any experience with the Closemaid stuff Home Depot sells? They have entire assemblies on sale today and I'm not familiar with them at all. This is one I was considering:

Impressions Basic Plus 60 in. W - 120 in. W Dark Cherry Wood Closet System

Flipperwaldt
Nov 11, 2011

Won't somebody think of the starving hamsters in China?





I've got this narrow slot filled with dead bamboo rhyzomes. I manually pulled out a small amount, but it takes an inordinate amount of time and it hurts my hands. I can't get a spade in. What's the right tool here?

tactlessbastard
Feb 4, 2001

Godspeed, post


Fun Shoe

In the interests of restoring domestic harmony, I've decided to paint the drip edge to match the fascia. Is there a trick to painting metal? I've never done it and I don't want it to start peeling off within a year

In other news I got that rotten beam replaced without destroying my carport or killing anyone.

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns






Flipperwaldt posted:



I've got this narrow slot filled with dead bamboo rhyzomes. I manually pulled out a small amount, but it takes an inordinate amount of time and it hurts my hands. I can't get a spade in. What's the right tool here?

A sharper spade or a mattock.

TooMuchAbstraction
Oct 14, 2012

Hubris

Fun Shoe

tactlessbastard posted:

In the interests of restoring domestic harmony, I've decided to paint the drip edge to match the fascia. Is there a trick to painting metal? I've never done it and I don't want it to start peeling off within a year

In other news I got that rotten beam replaced without destroying my carport or killing anyone.



Clean it, sand it, primer, then paint. Sanding scuffs it, giving the primer more surface area to adhere to; primer then lets the paint stick.

TacoHavoc
Dec 31, 2007
It's taco-y and havoc-y...at the same time!

Samadhi posted:

Does anyone have any experience with the Closemaid stuff Home Depot sells? They have entire assemblies on sale today and I'm not familiar with them at all. This is one I was considering:

Impressions Basic Plus 60 in. W - 120 in. W Dark Cherry Wood Closet System

Does Ikea have anything like that? They tend to be my go to for flat-pack stuff like that, since everyone's quality is kinda crappy and they are usually the least expensive.

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Flipperwaldt
Nov 11, 2011

Won't somebody think of the starving hamsters in China?



Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

A sharper spade or a mattock.
I'll see if I can borrow a mattock somewhere, thanks.

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