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KillHour
Oct 28, 2007




H110Hawk posted:

To be clear you should 100% do this and post about it. I am dyeing to see the outcome.

FTFY

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kid sinister
Nov 16, 2002


Flipperwaldt posted:



I've got this narrow slot filled with dead bamboo rhyzomes. I manually pulled out a small amount, but it takes an inordinate amount of time and it hurts my hands. I can't get a spade in. What's the right tool here?

How wide is that gap? That might be a job for a hori hori.

KillHour
Oct 28, 2007




Flipperwaldt posted:



I've got this narrow slot filled with dead bamboo rhyzomes. I manually pulled out a small amount, but it takes an inordinate amount of time and it hurts my hands. I can't get a spade in. What's the right tool here?

Fire.

H110Hawk
Dec 28, 2006


Deadite posted:

Does vinyl go on like wall paper? I guess I’m just more comfortable with paint but if I can do paper or vinyl myself then I am open to all of it

It's probably what your moon decal is printed on.

tactlessbastard
Feb 4, 2001

Godspeed, post


Fun Shoe

TooMuchAbstraction posted:

Clean it, sand it, primer, then paint. Sanding scuffs it, giving the primer more surface area to adhere to; primer then lets the paint stick.

What grit do you recommend?

TooMuchAbstraction
Oct 14, 2012

Hubris

Fun Shoe

tactlessbastard posted:

What grit do you recommend?

I'm not an expert, but my impression is that it doesn't really matter all that much. I'd guess anything between 60 and 400 would probably be fine. You're not really aggressively sanding it, you're just wiping across it a couple of times to get some scratches on the metal.

tactlessbastard
Feb 4, 2001

Godspeed, post


Fun Shoe

TooMuchAbstraction posted:

I'm not an expert, but my impression is that it doesn't really matter all that much. I'd guess anything between 60 and 400 would probably be fine. You're not really aggressively sanding it, you're just wiping across it a couple of times to get some scratches on the metal.

Thanks!

Flipperwaldt
Nov 11, 2011

Won't somebody think of the starving hamsters in China?



kid sinister posted:

How wide is that gap? That might be a job for a hori hori.


I keep blunting my tools on the cement or whatever of the foundation. Some sort of saw/knife combo might work. I might have some poo poo steak knives somewhere.


Yeah. The fence next to it isn't my property sadly.

TooMuchAbstraction
Oct 14, 2012

Hubris

Fun Shoe

Flipperwaldt posted:

Yeah. The fence next to it isn't my property sadly.

Get a canvas tarp, soak it in water, drape it on the fence, then fire?

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




I'd go with a gardening trowel, myself.

Slugworth
Feb 18, 2001

If two grown men can't make a pervert happy for a few minutes in order to watch a film about zombies, then maybe we should all just move to Iran!


Additonally, you can/should get a self etching primer for metal. That area looks small enough that spray paint might not be a bad solution. Krylon sells a good metal primer in that case.

eddiewalker
Apr 27, 2004


TooMuchAbstraction posted:

I'm not an expert, but my impression is that it doesn't really matter all that much. I'd guess anything between 60 and 400 would probably be fine. You're not really aggressively sanding it, you're just wiping across it a couple of times to get some scratches on the metal.

OP wants sanding sponges.

220 is kind of Goldilocks for “scratching up a surface for adhesion while removing dried-on roller hairs”

KKKLIP ART
Sep 3, 2004



We want to also paint the 60s as hell all wood cabinets where we are moving. So this is generally the process that I have found and y’all can tell me I am going to screw up super bad:

1. Disassemble doors and hardware and have a system to know what goes where for reassembly
2. Clean with a degreased / TSP really well, let dry
3. Sand with somewhere around 150 to 180, not going ham but taking the shiny finish off the surfaces, vacuum and tack cloth clean
4. Apply a good primer for kitchens (INSL-X prime lock?) with a foam roller, let totally dry and lightly sand with somewhere around 220 grit to smooth
4b. Apply second coat of primer if needed
5. First coat of paint with foam roller, let dry totally and lightly sand with 220ish grit
6. Second coat with foam roller, let totally dry
7. Reassemble

Does this seem like a decent set

We really hate super shiny, we got a sample of semigloss and really aren’t about that life. Would a satin be fine?

Final Blog Entry
Jun 23, 2006

"Love us with money or we'll hate you with hammers!"

If you're buying somewhere that sells Insl-x I would use their Stix for cabinets. Great bonding primer.

Satin is fine but get an appropriate enamel. A lot of companies have acrylic-alkyd hybrids and urethanes that are great hard finishes for cabinets.

KKKLIP ART
Sep 3, 2004



Final Blog Entry posted:

If you're buying somewhere that sells Insl-x I would use their Stix for cabinets. Great bonding primer.

Satin is fine but get an appropriate enamel. A lot of companies have acrylic-alkyd hybrids and urethanes that are great hard finishes for cabinets.

Wow, I'm glad that you mentioned the enamel aspect, nothing I saw mentioned it and I would have been super frustrated about going through that work and effort and it not lasting because it isnt an appropriate paint. If I cant find INSL-X, is there a decent secondary primer? I know that Kilz is sort of the big name brand. I am not sure the original cabinet type and I just see that Stix doesn't block tannin stains.

KKKLIP ART fucked around with this message at 13:13 on May 25, 2020

Jinkeez
Dec 31, 2008


Flipperwaldt posted:



I keep blunting my tools on the cement or whatever of the foundation. Some sort of saw/knife combo might work. I might have some poo poo steak knives somewhere.

They're a little pricey for what amounts to a serrated gardening shovel that you would use one time, but metal detectorists use a knife/saw kind of tool to cut and lever plugs of earth out of the ground, that can be placed back into the hole without ripping up too much of the surrounding grass. Here's a GIS'd pic of one.



I couldn't find a good short video of the process, but there are these knife-style ones, and long shovel-style ones.

Jinkeez fucked around with this message at 13:15 on May 25, 2020

Final Blog Entry
Jun 23, 2006

"Love us with money or we'll hate you with hammers!"

KKKLIP ART posted:

Wow, I'm glad that you mentioned the enamel aspect, nothing I saw mentioned it and I would have been super frustrated about going through that work and effort and it not lasting because it isnt an appropriate paint. If I cant find INSL-X, is there a decent secondary primer? I know that Kilz is sort of the big name brand. I am not sure the original cabinet type and I just see that Stix doesn't block tannin stains.

Whats on the cabinets now? Painted, stained and varnished, or what?

Edit- specifically for the topcoat Ben Moore Advance or Sherwin Williams Emerald Urethane are great options.

Final Blog Entry fucked around with this message at 13:58 on May 25, 2020

KKKLIP ART
Sep 3, 2004



Currently they seem to be stained and they are a bit glossy, so some sort of poly finish maybe.

I think we decided to do Behr Marquee for our interior walls, and it seems like the Benjamin Moore Advanced is the way to go for cabinets.

KKKLIP ART fucked around with this message at 15:43 on May 25, 2020

Final Blog Entry
Jun 23, 2006

"Love us with money or we'll hate you with hammers!"

If they're stained and poly'd then a shellac primer would be a good option if you don't mind messing with something alcohol based. It'll bite to the poly well and it's as good of a stain blocker as you're going to get. If you'd rather use a water based then get a good bonding primer like the Stix, XIM UMA, or Sherwin Williams Extreme Bond. Tannins aren't going to be a concern but if you sand too aggressively you could sand all the way through the poly and could get some bleed through of the wood stain. Just rough it up, don't try so sand it off. You could even do your TSP clean with a fine Scotch Brite pad (I think it's the grey ones) and that would probably rough the surface enough in the process that you wouldn't need to sand after.

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kid sinister
Nov 16, 2002


Flipperwaldt posted:



I keep blunting my tools on the cement or whatever of the foundation. Some sort of saw/knife combo might work. I might have some poo poo steak knives somewhere.

Yep, definitely a job for a hori hori. They're meant for digging and prying in rocks.

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