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Nigel Tufnel
Jan 3, 2005
You can't really dust for vomit.

CharlesWillisMaddox posted:

Where should I start with Brian Eno's solo work? Or. Where should I continue to? I randomly got Ambient 1 and Another Green World after reading a quick overview of him and enjoyed both of them.

Go for Apollo Soundtracks next. Bit more of a collection of songs rather than an evolving soundscape like Ambinent 1 though. Otherwise, I've heard On Land is the best after Music for Airports but I haven't heard it myself.

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dgt
Jan 25, 2005
hey

HP Hovercraft posted:

I've been wanting to listen to The Cocteau Twins for awhile now but their discography is kind of daunting. Where to start?

Start off with Treasure or maybe Head Over Heels. At least, thats where I started off from. Treasure is usually considered one of their best (if not their best) albums.

As for the OP, start out at the beginning. Get the first three Mothers of Invention albums. They're really among his best material to date. Also: Hot Rats, Weasles Ripped My Flesh, and Joe's Garage are also good places to start. And Sheik Yerbouti if you like hsi comedy stuff.

Boomzilla
Dec 2, 2007



Where should I start with Tom Waits? I bought Real Gone a couple years ago on a whim, and I really like the songs where it doesn't sound like he's barking into a megaphone. "Green Grass" and "Dead and Lovely" are amazing.

Sir Bobert Fishbone
Jan 16, 2006

Beebort


agro_cragg posted:

Where does one start with The Kinks?

Arthur, Village Green Preservation Society, and then Lola Versus Powerman and the Moneygoround, Part One

me your dad
Jul 25, 2006



moosey posted:

Where do I start with:

John Prine?

I got into John Prine about 8 years ago and the album that did it for me was the anthology called Great Days. It's a great two-disc album and is filled with good songs.

http://www.amazon.com/Great-Days-Jo...y/dp/B000003329

I've never felt the need to buy another album of his after having Great Days for so long.

Some of my favorite tracks from the compilation:

Christmas In Prison
Angel From Montgomery (amazing live version with Bonnie Rait)
Unwed Fathers
Storm Windows
Sabu Visits The Twin Cities Alone
Illegal Smile

me your dad fucked around with this message at Feb 5, 2008 around 15:12

Rubber Biscuit
Jan 21, 2007

Yeah, I was in the shit.

CharlesWillisMaddox posted:

Where should I start with Brian Eno's solo work? Or. Where should I continue to? I randomly got Ambient 1 and Another Green World after reading a quick overview of him and enjoyed both of them.

Though I haven't wandered too far down the Eno path, I picked up My Life In The Bush Of Ghosts on a whim, and found it to be brilliant. Though, this is MUCH more dense and energetic than his Ambient work (probably due largely to David Byrne's influence) it's well worth a listen.

Despite being one of the first uses of sampling it hasn't dated at all, and I find it to be as listenable as any rock recording. Even if you're after a more ambient listen, I still highly recommend you give this a try.

CharlesWillisMaddox
Jun 6, 2007

by angerbeet


Boomzilla posted:

Where should I start with Tom Waits? I bought Real Gone a couple years ago on a whim, and I really like the songs where it doesn't sound like he's barking into a megaphone. "Green Grass" and "Dead and Lovely" are amazing.

Rain Dogs and Swordfishtrombones

Willie The Disk
Feb 1, 2008

btw the pumpkin is gay

Boomzilla posted:

Where should I start with Tom Waits? I bought Real Gone a couple years ago on a whim, and I really like the songs where it doesn't sound like he's barking into a megaphone. "Green Grass" and "Dead and Lovely" are amazing.

Rain Dogs is where I started, and it's still my favorite album. Small Change is very good, though it's quite different from Real Gone. Judging by those two songs you mentioned, I would definitely recommend Alice.

Debonaire Boners
Feb 26, 2006

Time was so long ago

dgt posted:

Start off with Treasure or maybe Head Over Heels. At least, thats where I started off from. Treasure is usually considered one of their best (if not their best) albums.

As for the OP, start out at the beginning. Get the first three Mothers of Invention albums. They're really among his best material to date. Also: Hot Rats, Weasles Ripped My Flesh, and Joe's Garage are also good places to start. And Sheik Yerbouti if you like hsi comedy stuff.

Zappa & the Mothers- Yes!Freak Out is one of my all time faves, Classic Zappa. Some trippy poo poo on that album.

'Bout the Twins:

I'd have to respectfully disagree; I think Blue Bell Knoll would be the best starting point. Its right in the juxstaposition of their older sound (a la Treasure and Head Over Heels) and their newer sound ( Heaven or Las Vegas/Four Calendar Cafe/ The Moon and Melodies). I think it gives the best cross-section of how coarse and raw they can sound, yet still captures the etheral beauty they exude in later work.

Also, Robin Guthrie has a whole slew of independent work after and alongside the Twins, some with Harold Budd and Brian Eno. The new Two disc effort by Guthrie/Budd is excellent - After the Night Falls and Before the Day Breaks. Much more of an ambient style, exceptionally tranquil and soothing. Also the Mysterious Skin Soundtrack and Harold Budd's The White Arcades( produced by Eno) , are good Guthrie/Budd Collaborations.

also

Chinaski posted:

13 Songs and Repeater would probably be your best bet and are the two that got me into Fugazi as well. Those two albums have most of the familiar songs and are both great albums. And once you've gotten a feel for their sound, give the soundtrack to Instrument a listen to hear how diverse they are able to sound.

While all Fugazi's albums are excellent, I would lean towards Red Medicine or End Hits as a good Starting Point. Possibly Instrument as a starter as well.

Debonaire Boners fucked around with this message at Feb 6, 2008 around 03:15

Lestargis
Oct 25, 2005


Boomzilla posted:

Where should I start with Tom Waits? I bought Real Gone a couple years ago on a whim, and I really like the songs where it doesn't sound like he's barking into a megaphone. "Green Grass" and "Dead and Lovely" are amazing.

You would definitely like Alice then, which has a lot of songs like those two. From there, follow the other suggestions of Swordfishtrombones, Rain Dogs, and Small Change, all of them are very solid albums.

rebelliousjukebox
Oct 26, 2007


HAI posted:

Ape of Naples is great but pretty loose and druggy. I'd recommend Horse Rotorvator and Love's Secret Domain before it, they're not exactly "catchy" but more immediately accessible.

I'd add Scatology to Horse Rotorvator and LSD, those three are rather inseparable to me and make up the core of the first "phase" of their career - as a trilogy, those three albums are a totally unique and potentially life-changing musical experience, particularly when heard in conjunction with their respective remix albums (Gold Is The Metal, Stolen and Contaminated Songs). Scatology also has way more punk/dance overtones than the rest of their work, it being their first album, though the seriously Weird element of their work is still present in spades.

You might skip over the second phase of their career for now as it can be extremely alienating without being totally aware of the aims and intentions of their music (that and pretty much everything recorded between 1992 and 1999 is tainted and skewed by their coming off more hallucinogens and speed than you or I could possibly imagine doing in our lifetimes) and move right along to Musick To Play In The Dark, Vol. 1 for a taste of their later work.

rebelliousjukebox fucked around with this message at Feb 6, 2008 around 08:12

rebelliousjukebox
Oct 26, 2007


quote:

Where should I start with Brian Eno's solo work? Or. Where should I continue to? I randomly got Ambient 1 and Another Green World after reading a quick overview of him and enjoyed both of them.

If I were just starting to get into Brian Eno, I'd begin with all his albums with Roxy Music before moving on to his "rock" albums (Here Come The Warm Jets, Before and After Science, Etcetera), then hit up his Berlin Trilogy with David Bowie (Low, Heroes, Lodger). He also did a fantastic job producing Q: Are We Not Men? A: We Are Devo! and the No New York comp. He kind of lost his game once the 80s kicked into full gear, though he recently did some great work on last year's Allure EP by Fovea Hex, featuring Robert Fripp; which reminds me, you really need everything those two did together, though there's a lot of it and I don't know if it would be a good idea to hunt it all down before at the very least hearing the Berlin Trilogy and his work with Roxy Music.

rebelliousjukebox fucked around with this message at Feb 6, 2008 around 08:14

JAMOOOL
Oct 18, 2004

I LOVE TWO AND HALF MEN!! YOU 20 SOMETHINGS ARE JUST TOO CYNICAL TO UNDERSTAND IT!!

Sewer Shark posted:

What should I do with The Fall? I have Live at the Witch Trials and liked it but I took a look at their discography and when I saw that they're still going strong I didn't know where to go next.

Nobody agrees on what the best Fall albums are, so the best plan is to pick up the excellent 50,000 Fall Fans Can't Be Wrong comp and pick out your favorite tracks from there. They've never made a bad album, so if there's a certain song (or group of songs) you like, pick up one of those. The Wonderful and Frightening World of the Fall is probably the best place to start if you don't want a compilation. I started with The Real New Fall LP...it's one of their newer ones, but one of the best, containing some great rock tunes and a lot of good electronic effects. And if you like that one and decide to get into the Fall, look forward to becoming broke


Octavio posted:

Rush, Yes and King Crimson are three bands I've wanted to get into for a while. I've heard Tom Sawyer by Rush, I've seen all good people by Yes and 21st Century Schizoid Man and Epitaph by King Crimson. I like all of them =).

I don't know anything about Rush, but King Crimson I'm a big fan of. It's tricky to 'get started' on them because they're really 4 or 5 bands in one. The first incarnation (the one that did the songs you mentioned) is the most famous, and their debut, In the Court of the Crimson King, despite one pretty offputting section, is a major classic and should probably be heard by everyone. They reached another peak in the mid-70's with a harder rock sound, producing another classic album, Red. In you liked that, Lark's Tongues in Aspic is more difficult but also more rewarding and maybe their best album. After that, they broke up for 7 years and became a New Wave band - Discipline is a great album, and a lot more accessible than the stuff mentioned above, but seriously if you're interested in this era of the band, you should get the amazing live set Absent Lovers, which contains pretty much every good 80's track performed way better than in the studio. They broke up again and became another different band in the 90's through today - these discs are good, but nothing really essential.

Yes is a little easier to contain - their classic period is three albums (The Yes Album, Fragile, and Close to the Edge), of which Fragile is the best to start with (it should also contain a couple of recognizable tracks).


CharlesWillisMaddox posted:

Where should I start with Brian Eno's solo work? Or. Where should I continue to? I randomly got Ambient 1 and Another Green World after reading a quick overview of him and enjoyed both of them.

I honestly don't know a lot about his ambient work but I can say that all four of his vocal albums are astounding, especially if you like New Wave. Those are Here Come the Warm Jets, Taking Tiger Mountain, Another Green World, and Before and After Science. Since you've already got AGW, I'd get Before and After Science next, as it combines some of his best vocal pieces with some of his best ambient ones. It was the album I started with after reading up on the guy and I wouldn't have it any other way.


agro_cragg posted:

Where does one start with The Kinks?

The recommendation given already is pretty good and covers most of their good albums, but if you don't mind getting a compilation, get The Kink Kronikles - all the tracks are culled from their best period, and half of the tracks are singles and B-sides that aren't available on the albums. It's amazingly solid and should make you a fan.

rebelliousjukebox
Oct 26, 2007


Der Kommissar posted:

Nobody agrees on what the best Fall albums are, so the best plan is to pick up the excellent 50,000 Fall Fans Can't Be Wrong comp and pick out your favorite tracks from there. They've never made a bad album, so if there's a certain song (or group of songs) you like, pick up one of those. The Wonderful and Frightening World of the Fall is probably the best place to start if you don't want a compilation. I started with The Real New Fall LP...it's one of their newer ones, but one of the best, containing some great rock tunes and a lot of good electronic effects. And if you like that one and decide to get into the Fall, look forward to becoming broke

50,000 Fall Fans Can't Be Wrong is probably the second best Fall Comp you can buy, the first of course being the 6 disc Complete Peel Sessions, which is what I started with. The trouble with that is you get used to the sheen of the Peel Session production values, and the militantly lo-fi nature of most of The Fall's output then becomes rather disorienting - while you can learn to love it, it's better just to jump into the sludge head-first and treat yourself to those more polished versions later. I'm not sure if I would start with The Wonderful and Frightening World Of The Fall, as it's a transitional album, moving away from the total loving genius of Grotesque, Hex Induction Hour, and Perverted By Language - I myself would start with those three instead, though you have to then deal with the issue of everything else being just slightly subpar. After the aforementioned early 80's material, they take a fabulously ironic populist turn over the course of Wonderful And Frightening... and This Nation's Saving Grace and start making pop tunes and even flirt with the whole goth thing for a bit on Bend Sinister, after which they went on to perform with a ballet troupe and cover Victoria by The Kinks - while this doesn't mean the music is any worse, it does mean it's dumbed down a bit, more so after Brix left Mark/The Band and all he could sing about for several albums (Extricate, Shift Work, and Code: Selfish, all of which have recently been reissued and probably constitute my second favorite "phase" of The Fall) was the breakup. He then lost the core of his band in 1998 (after getting locked up in NYC for physically assaulting his bandmates), which was a good thing IMO as they were starting to fray around the edges in their last few years. M.E.S. kind of floundered around for a while, then revamped The Fall into the new powerful Rock Machine heard on Fall Heads Roll, my favorite of the newer Fall material. In typical Smithian fashion he of course sacked that band within a year or two and picked up a bunch of amateurish teenagers from LA to be his new band for Post TLC...and so on and so forth.

Your best bet, if you really want to know what The Fall (my favorite band) is about, is to pick up their first couple albums (from Dragnet up to Perverted By Language, I'd say) and listen to them on repeat for weeks. The following three part essay from K-Punk will help you sort it all out:

Memorex for the Krakens: The Fall's Pulp Modernism Part I
Memorex for the Krakens: The Fall's Pulp Modernism Part II
Memorex for the Krakens: The Fall's Pulp Modernism Part III

rebelliousjukebox fucked around with this message at Feb 6, 2008 around 09:25

Nigel Tufnel
Jan 3, 2005
You can't really dust for vomit.

Sunn O)))

No idea where to start. I think I'd like them though. Is their Boris collaboration highly rated?

Z.S. Ghost
Jan 1, 2008

Odd Fire Wolf Gang


Where should I start with Dire Straits?

The Monarch
Jul 7, 2006



I know this is vague, but how do I get into punk music? I haven't really ever listened to it, but I do like some of Iggy Pop. Thanks.

rebelliousjukebox
Oct 26, 2007


Nigel Tufnel posted:

Sunn O)))

No idea where to start. I think I'd like them though. Is their Boris collaboration highly rated?

Altar isn't a shabby album, but isn't really a good place to start with them and isn't really an accurate representation of what they're about. I'd start instead with the band that laid down the blueprints for Sunn O))) back in the early 90s, Earth. Their first two albums, Extra-Capsular Extraction and Earth II are both mandatory listening if you're looking to get into drone metal - their live album, Sunn Amps and Smashed Guitars is also pretty relevant, naturally. From there, I would look for Sunn O)))'s GrimmRobe Demos, Candlewolf Of Thee Golden Chalice (their peel session), and Flight Of The Behemoth, which is probably my favorite Sunn release and features Merzbow Merzbowing on two of the tracks.

After you've finished your homework with those, you'll be all set to appreciate Sunn's more recent material: White 1, White 2, and Black 1.

Ras Het
May 23, 2007

when I was a child, I spake as a child, I understood as a child, I thought as a child - but now I am a man.


The Monarch posted:

I know this is vague, but how do I get into punk music? I haven't really ever listened to it, but I do like some of Iggy Pop. Thanks.

The Saints - Stranded
Ramones - s/t
The Stooges - s/t
The Clash - s/t
New York Dolls - s/t
MC5 - Kick Out the Jams

The great early names. gently caress the Sex Pistols.

Piece
Dec 18, 2005


Where do I start with Shellac? (Does all of Albini's stuff sound like what I've heard off of 1000 Hurts?)

rebelliousjukebox
Oct 26, 2007


HAI posted:

gently caress the Sex Pistols.

Be careful not to write off Metal Box by Public Image Limited, though. John Lydon's voice is, when it comes down to it, one of the most iconic voices in punk, and Metal Box one of my favorite punk albums ever, even if it's more "post-punk" or whatever.

I'd imagine getting into punk music would be pretty difficult from scratch as you're going to have to listen to A LOT of loving music; I'd take it step by step starting with the albums Hai suggested, which were primarily released in the mid to late 70s, before moving on to the early 80s, when "punk" fractured up into hardcore (Black Flag, Minor Threat, Scratch Acid and The Minutemen are some of the best early hardcore acts) and post-punk (The Fall, The Birthday Party, Joy Division, and Public Image Limited are all essential listening). From there, I'd check out Sonic Youth's Daydream Nation followed by everything ever released by Fugazi.

Piece posted:

Where do I start with Shellac? (Does all of Albini's stuff sound like what I've heard off of 1000 Hurts?)

Don't start with Shellac, start with Big Black, Albini's first band. They've got two albums (in addition to a shitload of E.P.s and singles), Songs About loving and Atomizer, which together are unstoppable and an excellent place to start getting into Steve's poo poo. His next band, Rapeman, only put out one full length, Two Nuns and a Pack Mule, and it's inexpressibly awesome. Shellac is his 3rd band, and their first (and best) album is At Action Park. Terraform is their second LP and it's also very very good, though I definitely wouldn't start with it, as it's a bit more Out There than the rest of their material and takes some time to fully appreciate. 1000 Hurts and their newest, Excellent Italian Greyhound, are more masturbatory than the rest of his work, which is fine as he's getting old, but if you're starting out with that stuff you're going to have kind of a skewed perspective on his music.

rebelliousjukebox fucked around with this message at Feb 6, 2008 around 23:19

Rubber Biscuit
Jan 21, 2007

Yeah, I was in the shit.

Z.S. Ghost posted:

Where should I start with Dire Straits?

You can't really go wrong with Brothers in Arms, which IMO is their strongest release, though more mainstream than others. It's a solid collection of songs and covers a pretty wide scope of their sounds, as well as being just a drat good pop / rock crossover album.

Aside from that i'd recommend Love Over Gold which is a brilliant piece of work. It's a little more proggy, and the songs are much longer than on Brothers In Arms, but they pull it off very well. Telegraph Road in particular is a great piece, and there's also a few shorter, tighter songs placed in for good measure.

All in all, I don't think you can go wrong with either of these two albums, even when just starting out.

JAMOOOL
Oct 18, 2004

I LOVE TWO AND HALF MEN!! YOU 20 SOMETHINGS ARE JUST TOO CYNICAL TO UNDERSTAND IT!!

Alright, I've got a few:

Ken Ishii
New Order (I've got Technique and like it, but not sure what to do from there)
Kompakt material As in, who's the best?
Sonic Youth
Throbbing Gristle

All of these I've been meaning to check out, but don't have a clue where to start.

rivals
Apr 5, 2004

REBIRTH OF HARDCORE PRIDE!

Sonic Youth - Daydream Nation is my favorite.

Pibborando San
Dec 11, 2004

oh yes. two kinds... of dances


Pibborando San posted:

I got Miles Davis' "Bitches Brew" after hearing constant amazing things and it did not dissapoint. However, Davis' discography is longer than many papers I've written so I have no idea where to go next. Tips?

I also heard Kruder & Dorfmeister's "The K&D Sessions" which I liked a lot. What else should I listen to? On a similar note, Thievery Corporation. Where to begin?

I also bought Goldie's "Saturnz Return" on a whim and am kinda indifferent towards it. Is there another album that will blow me away or be more indicative of his sound or do I just not "get" it?

No one can help me?

Theusz Hamtaahk
Jan 8, 2008
Kobaia iss de Hundin

Pibborando San posted:

No one can help me?

For Miles, if you enjoyed Bitches Brew, then maybe some of his other 70s albums would be your speed. In A Silent Way is pretty essential, as is A Tribute to Jack Johnson.

The albums Big Fun and Get Up With It are (if my memory serves me) stuff that Miles recorded during the Bitches Brew sessions. They might be a good direction to go after Silent Way or Jack Johnson.

juan the owl
Oct 26, 2007

THERE'S A MONSTER AT THE END OF THIS POST!!


Pibborando San posted:

I got Miles Davis' "Bitches Brew" after hearing constant amazing things and it did not dissapoint. However, Davis' discography is longer than many papers I've written so I have no idea where to go next. Tips?

For god's sake, get Kinda Blue. Excellent melancholy jazz, I could listen to that album everyday. Sketches of Spain also is pretty highly regarded. e: ^^ Or do what he said.

I've been wanting to get into Louden Wainwright III. So far I've tended to like the sound of his solo acoustic and live stuff the most, but though he's only got a couple acoustic studio albums he's got a LOT of live albums. Where should I start?

Theusz Hamtaahk
Jan 8, 2008
Kobaia iss de Hundin

juan the owl posted:

For god's sake, get Kinda Blue. Excellent melancholy jazz, I could listen to that album everyday. Sketches of Spain also is pretty highly regarded. e: ^^ Or do what he said.

I've been wanting to get into Louden Wainwright III. So far I've tended to like the sound of his solo acoustic and live stuff the most, but though he's only got a couple acoustic studio albums he's got a LOT of live albums. Where should I start?


Kind of Blue is common sense, but he really liked Bitches Brew. The other ones are a bit closer than Miles' hard-bop stuff.

funkcroquet
Nov 29, 2004



Der Kommissar posted:

Sonic Youth
Throbbing Gristle

SY: Daydream Nation, Sister and EVOL in that order
TG: Second Annual Report and 20 Jazz Funk Greats

Pibborando San posted:

No one can help me?

A Tribute to Jack Johnson, On the Corner and Agharta are the best of Davis' fusion period besides Bitches Brew, and if you like them, try the Cellar Door sessions box and any number of the other live albums from the early 70s. Herbie Hancock's albums on Warner Brothers (they're in a 2-disc set on CD) are spacey and masterful and similar to Bitches Brew for the most part. For the most part, you can safely ignore Weather Report, Return to Forever and the other pop-fusion bands.

Hartman
Dec 20, 2005
Blade Runner extrodinare

Sorry if mine is too general, but where do I start with Jazz. I never really was into music growing up, save the oldies station that my parents had on in the car, so can someone give me a few popular artists for each major category (and tell me what those categories are)?

Edit:

voland posted:

Man, there's an ongoing thread on the first page exactly about getting into jazz.

Nevertheless, my answer is Kind of Blue.

I guess I must be blind, I'll just look at that thread, thanks!

Hartman fucked around with this message at Feb 7, 2008 around 17:25

voland
Oct 29, 2007
I put the "sexy" in "dyslexia".

Hartman posted:

Sorry if mine is too general, but where do I start with Jazz. I never really was into music growing up, save the oldies station that my parents had on in the car, so can someone give me a few popular artists for each major category (and tell me what those categories are)?

Man, there's an ongoing thread on the first page exactly about getting into jazz.

Nevertheless, my answer is Kind of Blue.

Ras Het
May 23, 2007

when I was a child, I spake as a child, I understood as a child, I thought as a child - but now I am a man.


Pibborando San posted:

I got Miles Davis' "Bitches Brew" after hearing constant amazing things and it did not dissapoint. However, Davis' discography is longer than many papers I've written so I have no idea where to go next. Tips?

To be honest, I think Bitches Brew is really boring compared to Miles' best live fusion stuff. Only In A Silent Way is worse (so don't get it lolll). Anyway, Pangaea and Agharta were recorded on the same day at some Japanese festival and both are really loving tight, endless grooves and a lot of squeaky noise. Then there's Dark Magus which is like a constant 80-minute mass of sound, really awesome. Then there's Live-Evil which is a bit more sober but still good and Jack Johnson which is slightly better than Bitches Brew and prob right up your alley.

As for similar stuff not by Miles, I'm no expert but Herbie Hancock had a really good thing going from 1971 to 1973 with the albums Mwandishi, Sextant and Crossings. Really spacey and hosed up. After them he released the Řberpopular Head Hunters which is a funky turd. You'll probably like it though, I'm the crazy old man of the jazz lovin' internet with my opinions no one shares.

Warszawa
Aug 2, 2004



CharlesWillisMaddox posted:

Where should I start with Brian Eno's solo work? Or. Where should I continue to? I randomly got Ambient 1 and Another Green World after reading a quick overview of him and enjoyed both of them.
That's basically the perfect place to start

Continue to Here Come the Warm Jets, Taking Tiger Mountain, and Before and After Science for his pop output, go for Music for Films, Apollo, and Thursday Afternoon for ambient work (imho)

Truth be told I get really sick of his pop work because I feel like he can't find direction and purpose by himself, a lot of it feels incredibly shallow to me. I think they're all genius albums, but I like him a lot better when he's working on something ambient or on putting a perfect polish on another group's work.

Ok now somebody tell me how to listen to The Who

Revolutionaut
Oct 27, 2005
The Pumpkin Ghost of Halloween Future

Low. I already have Drums and Guns and The Great Destroyer, so I guess this is more of a "Where do I go from here?" They have a pretty daunting discography.

Brodeurs Nanny
Nov 2, 2006



CharlesWillisMaddox posted:

Where should I start with Brian Eno's solo work? Or. Where should I continue to? I randomly got Ambient 1 and Another Green World after reading a quick overview of him and enjoyed both of them.

Get "Music for Airports."

RollerBob
Apr 25, 2005

just... fuck you

Where do I start with:
Journey?

monstertruckdriver
Jul 23, 2006
give em another 3% and make em water

I realize he's quite prolific and has a ton of bands, but what's a good starting point for Mike Patton?

Xynobia
Mar 17, 2007


Emmitt Nervend posted:

What about Fugazi? It's one of those bands I always hear talked about, and everyone I know of who is into them is REALLY into them.

Chinaski was right about starting with the first two albums...I bought all their albums in order, and even though it's one of the most popular/influential 13 Songs is one of my least-played. Repeater--and the more experimental Red Medicine--on the other hand, I play at least once a month. Repeater's an awesome starting place.

monstertruckdriver posted:

I realize he's quite prolific and has a ton of bands, but what's a good starting point for Mike Patton?

Tomahawk are my favorite Patton project, but Faith No More's Angel Dust is the album that really turned me on to him. It's an amazing album, and showcases his early talents without being completely insane. His Peeping Tom album is similarly accessible and badass. Depending on what your tastes are, I'd go with Mr. Bungle's Disco Volante (experimental rock), Dillinger Escape Plan's Irony is a Dead Scene EP (metal/hardcore) or Fantomas' Delýrium C˛rdia (avant-garde) for follow-up.

Xynobia fucked around with this message at Feb 10, 2008 around 06:25

rebelliousjukebox
Oct 26, 2007


monstertruckdriver posted:

I realize he's quite prolific and has a ton of bands, but what's a good starting point for Mike Patton?

Mr. Bungle. There are three albums: Self-Titled, Disco Violante, and California. It's all downhill from there, though I do like Fantomas if just for the sheer wow factor of Dave Lombardo, Trevor Dunn, and Buzz Osborne playing together. I'd start with The Director's Cut by Fantomas if you're not familiar with what they do (Delirium Cordia is probably their most difficult work and I wouldn't recommend it straight out) and for posterity's sake you should probably get a hold of Angel Dust by Faith No More as well (I'm not a huge fan, but I used to be and you might like them). Tomahawk is his fourth main project, and it kind of sucks, mostly because of Patton's painfully bad lyrics. The rest of his work mostly consists of one-off side projects, his E.P. with Dillinger Escape Plan (Irony Is A Dead Scene) and all his work with John Zorn probably being the cream of the crop.

Oh, and get the song Secrets 4 Sale off Down With The Scene by Kid 606 to hear Patton getting his rap on in fine form.

rebelliousjukebox fucked around with this message at Feb 10, 2008 around 07:08

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Pat Clements
Feb 10, 2008


Warszawa posted:

That's basically the perfect place to start

Continue to Here Come the Warm Jets, Taking Tiger Mountain, and Before and After Science for his pop output, go for Music for Films, Apollo, and Thursday Afternoon for ambient work (imho)

Truth be told I get really sick of his pop work because I feel like he can't find direction and purpose by himself, a lot of it feels incredibly shallow to me. I think they're all genius albums, but I like him a lot better when he's working on something ambient or on putting a perfect polish on another group's work.

Ok now somebody tell me how to listen to The Who
Go with Who's Next first. Excellent, excellent album. At any given moment in time at least one radio station somewhere in the world is playing a song from it, and for very good reason. While some argue over whether it's their best, it's easily their most accessible.

From there, I'd head to Tommy. It's a great concept album (though even Townshend has admitted he doesn't really think the story makes sense), but it's also got some shining tracks like Pinball Wizard that stand up well even viewed out of context.

If you pick any album they released from 1965 to 1974 it's guaranteed to be very good at the minimum. Depending on your tastes you'll like some more than others, but if you like Who's Next and Tommy you'll enjoy at least large chunks of every one.

Don't touch Face Dances, Who by Numbers, It's Hard, and Who Are You until you've exhausted their earlier stuff. They all have some bright points, and some people love them, but they're not particularly accessible and a decline in Townshend's songwriting and the band's tightness is definitely evident.

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