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cryme
Apr 9, 2004

by zen death robot


Mr. Pither posted:

How 'bout W.A.S.P. and Kyuss?

Can't help you with W.A.S.P., but for Kyuss you need Welcome to Sky Valley, then Blues for the Red Sun, then ..And the Circus Leaves Town, then any of their split/EP material. Avoid Wretch until you've exhausted everything else.

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Captain Slaveman
Nov 25, 2007



Where do I start with Bob Dylan?

Xynobia
Mar 17, 2007


Roasted Donut posted:

Dance of December Souls is their debut, and without a doubt their best work to date. Their second album, Brave Murder Day, is also good. If want something good that's more recent, Viva Emptiness and The Great Cold Distance are both quality, but much different from their roots.

I agree with the second part here, definitely. Unless you're a pretty big death metal fan already, the first two albums may fall on deaf ears at first. Viva Emptiness was my intro to the band, which then lead me to discover their older/heavier albums, which I enjoy a lot more now. But I'd say start with Viva or Great Cold Distance and work back, not forward.

If you're already really into death metal, disregard this.

Stan Baniszewski
Jul 3, 2007


Captain Slaveman posted:

Where do I start with Bob Dylan?

1) Blonde on Blonde
2) Highway 61 Revisited
3) Bringing It All Back Home
4) Blood on the Tracks
5) The Basement Tapes
6) Desire
7) The freewheelin' Bob Dylan
8) Another Side of Bob Dylan
9) John Wesley Harding
10) The Times They Are A-Changin'

hatelull
Oct 29, 2004



JoeRules posted:

What's a good starting point for The Afghan Whigs?

Honestly, that depends on what you seek. 1965 is sweaty dirty sex in a back alley of the French Quarter pre-Katrina. With lines like "you can gently caress my body baby/but please don't gently caress my mind", Dulli channels some serious motown. Gentlemen will probably have the song you might recognize if you were into college rock back in the 90's. "Debonair" got a lot of radio play and is fairly characteristic of the Subpop sound. Therefore, it's probably the most accessible. My personal favorite is Black Love. This is film-noir put to music. "Honky's Ladder" got a bit of play, but overall this record was incredibly dark and even the one single was probably to "edgy" for play at the time. Still, when the dude sings "got you were i want you motherfucker/i got five upon you now" he generates a persona of not loving around. Dulli was always portrayed as a rakish rear end in a top hat. The kinda dude that would fill you up with drugs and booze and then go gently caress your girlfriend while you sit drooling at the ceiling in the other room.

If you're not sure of taking on a whole album, they recently released a quite excellent greatest hits compilation, Unbreakable. This contains tracks from all the albums I mentioned above, plus their first two studio albums Up In It and Congregation and a track from their motown covers ep Uptown Avondale. Up In It is noisier Sub-pop fare, while Congregation mapped out the framework for their affair with soul and r+b. Plus, the compilation has two new (unreleased) tracks that are worth hearing.


Also, check out Blackberry Belle from the Twilight Singers and the upcoming Gutter Twins release for more Dulli goodness (with Mark Lanegan to boot).

hatelull fucked around with this message at Feb 23, 2008 around 20:50

The Bacon God
Oct 20, 2007

Himmelschreibende
Herzen

sky-writing hearts


a sharp thing posted:

Get "Music for Airports."

Ambient 1 is Music for Airports. I've been wondering if anyone could suggest a good introduction to Don Caballero. I've heard a few songs that I can't remember the names of, but I don't have any full albums. Actually, any listening suggestions that sound like them would be welcome also.

HP Hovercraft
Dec 31, 2005

one thing a computer can do that most humans can't is be sealed up in a cardboard box and sit in a warehouse

The Bacon God posted:

Ambient 1 is Music for Airports. I've been wondering if anyone could suggest a good introduction to Don Caballero. I've heard a few songs that I can't remember the names of, but I don't have any full albums. Actually, any listening suggestions that sound like them would be welcome also.
Don Caballero 2 is your best starting point. After that move on to What Burns Never Returns and then American Don.

Don Caballero 2 is probably their harshest sounding album, it's pretty heavy at times, but if you don't enjoy that don't let that keep you from checking out American Don, as it's much more melodic and beautiful. What Burns Never Returns is a nice medium between these two sounds.

As far as other bands that sound like Don Cab, I would recommend early Hella, Oxes, Breadwinner, Sleeping People, Tera Melos, and Dazzling Killmen.

stiknork
Aug 3, 2006



Where should I start with Explosions in the Sky?

J A V A
Feb 25, 2007

I could think about computer programming forever up here. aw crud.

Any Husker Du recommendations?

JoeRules
Jul 11, 2001


stiknork posted:

Where should I start with Explosions in the Sky?

I'm not a diehard, so someone may offer a different opinion, but I would have no problem at all starting with All of a Sudden I Miss Everyone. It's their most recent, it's incredibly solid, and it sucked me in the first time I heard it.

kirkjames
Jul 23, 2005



Toyotadon posted:

Any Husker Du recommendations?

Is there really any other way to get into them other than Zen Arcade?

NON
Jun 5, 2003

GAY

Celois posted:

I would recommend Songs of Faith and Devotion and definitely Violater. After that Music for the Masses is also a good album. These are probably among their best albums. From there, I would probably just take up their other albums and pick off some of the songs you like. For example, Exciter is not that great of an album, but Shine is a very good song off that.

Whatever you do, don't touch Speak and Spell--everything Vince Clarke touches turns to poo poo like an anti-midas touch.

Well, your poor opinion aside on Vince Clarke...

I would start with Violator as suggested, then Black Celebration...then Playing the Angel (their newest), then Speak and Spell to see where they started.

echinopsis
Apr 13, 2004



Lipstick Apathy

I hope it's cool to put down a genre here not an artist..

I'm into thrash metal, ideally sepultura's "beneath the remains" and I've read that thrash came from metal and hardcore punk. When I look into more metal, it just all seems so drat cheesy, and not really like what I want to be listening to. So if hardcore punk is the other side.. What are some good bands to check out?

rivals
Apr 5, 2004

REBIRTH OF HARDCORE PRIDE!

stiknork posted:

Where should I start with Explosions in the Sky?

Those Who Tell The Truth Shall Die...

Devil Wears Wings
Jul 17, 2006

Look ye upon the wages of diet soda and weep, for it is society's fault.


Another vague genre post, I know. But, where would I start with '70s (or '70s-style) funk? I've heard a lot that I like in the genre lately, but I don't know any band or album names.

cryme
Apr 9, 2004

by zen death robot


Toyotadon posted:

Any Husker Du recommendations?

Zen Arcade and New Day Rising are probably all you need.

Bobby The Rookie
Jun 2, 2005



cryme posted:

Zen Arcade and New Day Rising are probably all you need.
Not by a longshot, but those are the two best starting points.

ackapoo
Nov 15, 2007

fun leads to abortions!


stiknork posted:

Where should I start with Explosions in the Sky?

All of a Sudden I Miss Everyone is a good start. Then I would get into The Earth Is Not A Cold Dead Place, also a great album of theirs.

Pibborando San posted:

On a similar note, Thievery Corporation. Where to begin?

Start with The Richest Man In Babylon, it is their most accessible album I've seen. Then go with The Mirror Conspiracy > Sounds from the Thievery Hi-Fi > The Outernational Sound (probably one of their best compilation albums).

---

I'd like to get into Boards of Canada. I've already obtained The Campfire Headphase, so I don't know where to go from there. Any ideas?

Domukaz
Jul 29, 2007

by Ozma


ackapoo posted:

All of a Sudden I Miss Everyone is a good start. Then I would get into The Earth Is Not A Cold Dead Place, also a great album of theirs.


Start with The Richest Man In Babylon, it is their most accessible album I've seen. Then go with The Mirror Conspiracy > Sounds from the Thievery Hi-Fi > The Outernational Sound (probably one of their best compilation albums).

---

I'd like to get into Boards of Canada. I've already obtained The Campfire Headphase, so I don't know where to go from there. Any ideas?

Your next Boards of Canada album should probably be Music Has the Right to Children. But I've only got that and Geogaddi, so take that with a grain of salt.

This is going to sound stupid, but where should I start with the Rolling Stones?

Willie The Disk
Feb 1, 2008

btw the pumpkin is gay

mandruku posted:

So if hardcore punk is the other side.. What are some good bands to check out?

You need to obtain these albums...

Damaged by Black Flag
Minor Threat by Minor Threat
Bad Brains and/or Rock for Light by Bad Brains
Dance With Me by TSOL
Plastic Surgery Disasters by the Dead Kennedys
Complete Discography by the Germs
EP-LP by the Subhumans

Although those are more traditional Hardcore Punk albums... IMO. I Against I by Bad Brains is kind of like Punk/Metal fusion, so check that out too.

Stan Baniszewski
Jul 3, 2007


Domukaz posted:

Your next Boards of Canada album should probably be Music Has the Right to Children. But I've only got that and Geogaddi, so take that with a grain of salt.


They are both definitely better than "The campfire headphase".


Domukaz posted:

This is going to sound stupid, but where should I start with the Rolling Stones?



Anything from "Aftermath" (1966) to "Exile on Main St." (1972).
I couldn't rank them in any order, because they are all amazing.

Edit: you can also start with this excellent compilation containing all the singles from their best period:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Single...he_London_Years

Stan Baniszewski fucked around with this message at Feb 27, 2008 around 09:57

19charactersorless.
Apr 26, 2006

If these guys do their job I might have my eyes back in as soon as Monday.

Where do I start with... Afrobeat?

I got interested in it after hearing some Boredoms live concerts, if that's any help...

Willie The Disk
Feb 1, 2008

btw the pumpkin is gay

19charactersorless. posted:

Where do I start with... Afrobeat?

I got interested in it after hearing some Boredoms live concerts, if that's any help...

Well I know the best, and that's a Mr. Fela Kuti. Fela Kuti is amazing. Get Zombie, Expensive poo poo, and Confusion. He's so good. Beyond Kuti I don't really know much afrobeat, but that's definitely a drat good place to start.

Ras Het
May 23, 2007

when I was a child, I spake as a child, I understood as a child, I thought as a child - but now I am a man.


Boredoms, afrobeat = ???

Anyway, beyond Fela, there's lots of great afrobeat comps but most of them are out of print so you kinda have to rely on blogs or P2P to find them. "Nigeria 70 - The Definite Story of the Funky Lagos" is an essential two-disc comp, as are "Afro Baby - The Evolution of the Afro Sound in Nigeria" (still on print) and "AfricaFunk - Return to the Original Sound of 1970s Funky Africa". Then there's "Ghana Soundz" volumes 1 & 2 and Moussa Doumbia's "Keleya" for great stuff outside Nigeria. Most of the artists never released their albums outside Africa so the most convenient way to approach afrobeat is with comps like those. And if you just like the sound but don't care about the politics, there's a great one called "Nigeria Special" released last month, and a double CD of Orlando Julius' early afrofunk albums called "Super Afro Soul".

For modern afrobeat there's the (predominantly white, for shame) Antibalas Afrobeat Orchestra who are pretty experimental and heavy at times so that might be a good way to start too.

Xynobia
Mar 17, 2007


cryme posted:

Zen Arcade and New Day Rising are probably all you need.

Flip Your Wig is mandatory listening too, pal. But I'd start with New Day Rising (a little poppier) or the aforementioned Zen Arcade (more hardcore).

Poopsichord
Aug 8, 2005

POPOPOPOPO

Where can I start with Man or Astro-man?

19charactersorless.
Apr 26, 2006

If these guys do their job I might have my eyes back in as soon as Monday.

HAI posted:

Boredoms, afrobeat = ???

+ really useful information

re: boredoms, yeah in recent live shows the syncopation of the drummers and the keyboards/singing of yoshimi were described to me by two japanese music freaks as 'like afrobeat', hence my fascination.

Thanks for the tips, got a hold of Nigeria 70 and it's exactly what I was looking for!

Col.Kiwi
Dec 28, 2004
And the grave digger puts on the forceps...

cryme posted:

for Kyuss you need Welcome to Sky Valley, then Blues for the Red Sun, then ..And the Circus Leaves Town, then any of their split/EP material. Avoid Wretch until you've exhausted everything else.
To provide an alternative viewpoint, I'd suggest starting with Blues for the Red Sun. It flows very well and IMO it's not only the best possible introduction to Kyuss it's the best possible introduction to stoner rock. From that point I'd check out Welcome to Sky Valley and after that you're either hooked or you probably just don't like Kyuss. Wretch is harder to get into and should be heard after you're already into the band, but I definitely don't think it's inferior - only less accessible.

Welcome to Sky Valley is a fabulous album but I tend to shy away from reccomending it as someone's first Kyuss album like many people do because I think it's a little more homogenous than some of their other works. It has more of a particular feel throughout the album, Blues for the Red Sun is a bit more varied in showing different styles.

KarateExplosion
Sep 15, 2007



Where do I start with the blues? Like, blues with lots of really twangy guitar and lots of wah?

All this jazz talk is making me want to check it out too, I might have to get some of those Miles Davis cds you guys have been talking about.

Willie The Disk
Feb 1, 2008

btw the pumpkin is gay

KarateExplosion posted:

Where do I start with the blues? Like, blues with lots of really twangy guitar and lots of wah?

I don't really know much blues with a wah wah pedal... but I can tell you some good blues with harmonicas that kinda go wah.

Anyway, Howlin' Wolf is important, and pretty darn good too. Led Zeppelin, The Doors, Jimi Hendrix, Tom Waits, etc. all covered a Howlin' Wolf song here or there. Killin' Floor is amazing. The Chess Box set has most of the Wolf you'd want.

I'm a big fan of Robert Johnson too, and I'd highly recommend him. If by twangy guitar you mean old beat up guitar, yeah, Robert Johnson. Really desolate, sell your soul to the devil music. Just a sad, sad black man with a beat up guitar. Died at 27. And there's only 1 hour and 46 minutes of Robert Johnson recorded, most of it's the same chord progression, and it's all amazing.

Son House. I've had trouble finding a lot of his stuff, but he's something special. Like a more powerful Robert Johnson. A Best Of collection would do pretty good.

Howlin' Wolf is Chicago Electric Blues, and Robert Johnson and Son House are the Delta Blues. There's some sort of a start.

Also, the White Stripes are really based on this type of the music, for the most part. If you haven't looked past their radio hits, do so now. Grab De Stijl and their self titled.

Willie The Disk fucked around with this message at Feb 29, 2008 around 04:50

KarateExplosion
Sep 15, 2007



Willie The Disk posted:

I don't really know much blues with a wah wah pedal... but I can tell you some good blues with harmonicas that kinda go wah.

Anyway, Howlin' Wolf is important, and pretty darn good too. Led Zeppelin, The Doors, Jimi Hendrix, Tom Waits, etc. all covered a Howlin' Wolf song here or there. Killin' Floor is amazing. The Chess Box set has most of the Wolf you'd want.

I'm a big fan of Robert Johnson too, and I'd highly recommend him. If by twangy guitar you mean old beat up guitar, yeah, Robert Johnson. Really desolate, sell your soul to the devil music. Just a sad, sad black man with a beat up guitar. Died at 27. And there's only 1 hour and 46 minutes of Robert Johnson recorded, most of it's the same chord progression, and it's all amazing.

Son House. I've had trouble finding a lot of his stuff, but he's something special. Like a more powerful Robert Johnson. A Best Of collection would do pretty good.

Howlin' Wolf is Chicago Electric Blues, and Robert Johnson and Son House are the Delta Blues. There's some sort of a start.

Also, the White Stripes are really based on this type of the music, for the most part. If you haven't looked past their radio hits, do so now. Grab De Stijl and their self titled.

Actually just yesterday a friend recommended a few Led Zepplin songs, saying they were really bluesy, and I looked down and saw Otis Rush and Howlin' Wolf listed as their original artists. So I looked both of those guys up and immediately started to like them. Now I've got an Otis Rush and I think a Howlin' Wolf cd in the mail already. Sounds like I'm on the right track. Chicago Blues seems pretty cool.

I'll have to check out Robert Johnson. I've heard a lot about him, but I haven't really listened to any.

Domukaz
Jul 29, 2007

by Ozma


KarateExplosion posted:

Where do I start with the blues? Like, blues with lots of really twangy guitar and lots of wah?

All this jazz talk is making me want to check it out too, I might have to get some of those Miles Davis cds you guys have been talking about.

A really good Miles CD is Kind of Blue, but I guess that goes without saying. It's really tasteful and well-played music. However, that's also an "obligatory" album--my personal favorite is actually A Tribute to Jack Johnson, which is two slices of jazz-rock as it should have been done.

Check out John Coltrane (Giant Steps and My Favorite Things, A Love Supreme if you like those) and Sonny Rollins (Saxophone Colossus in particular), too. Both were saxophonists who played with Miles at some point in their careers. Almost any Miles sideman's bandleader work is going to be good, in my experience.

Dave Brubeck's Time Out is good as an intro to cool jazz, as far as I know. I've never heard much good about cool jazz. Can anyone fill me in?

Anyway, jazz is a massive, massive genre and getting a good introduction to it is going to take a long time, never mind getting the ability to really appreciate it. Good luck, should you decide to take the plunge.

johnelway7
Sep 25, 2004


agro_cragg posted:

Sorry to be a snob, but I'm kinda hurting for cash right now. I can only buy one or two albums at this point. Are there just a couple of early Misfits albums that could set me on the right path?

The liberry will beer froot.

moosey
Apr 23, 2006

by Fistgrrl


Where do I start w/ Talking Heads

I LOVE 77, and Speaking In Toungues wasn't that bad. I want more songs like "No Compassion" and "The Book I Read"!

NAS
Love Illmatic like most do, wasn't thoroughly impressed by Hip Hop Is Dead. Where to next?

Lil Wayne?
Tha Carter 2 was cool, where do I go with all these mixtapes and poo poo?

John Prine, Ghostface Killah, Dinosaur Jr., The Clash.....feel free to help me out with any of those too. Hope some other people benefit from these!

RobertKerans
Aug 25, 2006

There is a heppy lend
Fur, fur aw-a-a-ay.

Poopsichord posted:

Where can I start with Man or Astro-man?

If there is any chance at all you can see them, go and see them. This is unlikely, though, as past the few shows they did in 2006, there hasn't been much seen of them. Seeing them on the EEVIAC tour was just about the best gig I've ever been to, and listening to the albums is better with context

So start with Is It...Man or Astro-Man?, their first release, which is a live recording. Then Intravenous Television Continuum and EEVIAC: Operational Index and Reference, both of which are great.

Then Destroy All Astromen!! is another live album, though not quite as good as their first. Then...well, it starts to get slightly repetetive. There's still great stuff on their other albums, but there don't seem to be enough new riffs to go around. Much as I love MoA-M?, I would be happy just having those first three albums, plus A Spectrum of Finite Scale. The earlier ones are more straight ahead space-surf music, and the later ones get more experimental as they start building their own samples rather than just taking it all from NASA or B-movies.

A Spectrum of Finite Scale is possibly the best album, but it was limited to 1000 copies, so it's hard to get hold of, and it's a lot more experimental than the rest of their stuff - to quote "done by members of the Astro Staff Live Division, in isolation or in pairs". It's much slower than everything else, without as much surf rock, and pretty trippy.

EDIT: no, EEVIAC's their best album, after just having a listen to it. Also the packaging is great, card cut like computer punch-cards with technical drawings of ancient computers. The artwork throughout all of their releases is awesome, but EEVIC's pretty special.

RobertKerans fucked around with this message at Mar 1, 2008 around 15:55

ultrafilter
Aug 23, 2007

It is time for your viscera to see the light of day!

moosey posted:

Where do I start w/ Talking Heads

I LOVE 77, and Speaking In Toungues wasn't that bad. I want more songs like "No Compassion" and "The Book I Read"!

The first four albums (77, More Songs about Buildings and Food, Fear of Music, and Remain in Light) are all excellent. Songs is the closest to 77 stylistically. Don't miss out on The Name of This Band is Talking Heads either--it's a 2-disc live album covering the first three albums and definitely worth hearing.

After that, the albums tend to attract a wider variety of opinions. Stop Making Sense is essential both as an album and a movie. I'm not wild about Speaking in Tongues, but Little Creatures is one of my favorites. I didn't like True Stories until I saw the movie (rent before you buy) but now I do. Naked is for completists only.

There's also a 2-disc greatest hits collection, Sand in the Vaseline, that covers their entire career chronologically and will give you a pretty good idea of what each album sounds like. There are also a few songs on there that I don't think are available anywhere else.

Uncle Meat
Feb 8, 2008

I will eat your children.

Where do I start with rockabilly a la Th' Legendary Shack Shakers?

Fast and/or dirty (with punklike or bluesy influences) is my kind of rockabilly.

Dr. Platypus
Oct 25, 2007


Gogol Bordello. I've listened to some of their songs on their Myspace and Youtube, but am looking to go a bit deeper. I'm only looking to pick up one or two albums at this point.

Willie The Disk
Feb 1, 2008

btw the pumpkin is gay

Uncle Meat posted:

Where do I start with rockabilly a la Th' Legendary Shack Shakers?

Fast and/or dirty (with punklike or bluesy influences) is my kind of rockabilly.

Um, have you heard of Psychobilly? Look into the Reverend Horton Heat. He's probably the artist closest to rockabilly who's labeled psychobilly. Fast, hard, and talented like no other. Then after that, psychobilly's stuff like Mad Sin and Demented Are Go. Not my cup of tea, but some people love it.

I think The Monsters are insanely good, and not just dirty, they're trashy. Sounds more like punk, but it's still based mainly in rockabilly goodness. I highly recommend them. They have some mp3s on their site.

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Pulling Teeth
Jan 13, 2008
My Cadillac got that bass

Devil Wears Wings posted:

Another vague genre post, I know. But, where would I start with '70s (or '70s-style) funk? I've heard a lot that I like in the genre lately, but I don't know any band or album names.

Well, I guess you can't go past Parliament and Funkadelic for a start. I don't like either of them very much, but they are both George Clinton and he's probably the most revered figure in 70s funk. Then you have James Brown's later stuff, which got deeper and funkier as it went along. You should also check out The Commodores, Earth Wind & Fire, Kool & The Gang, most of the poo poo that came out on Atlantic after 1970, later stuff by The Temptations, early Prince, The Meters, Cymande...the list goes on. Listen to the big groups of the genre first and go from there.

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