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Kvlt!
May 19, 2012

Now waffles taste good for breakfast but they're not so good to eat in the third period of a hockey game


Where do I start with the Cure if the only album I've listened to is Disintegration (which I liked)?

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El Gallinero Gros
Mar 17, 2010


Kvlt! posted:

Where do I start with the Cure if the only album I've listened to is Disintegration (which I liked)?

Pornography and Head on the Door.

hatelull
Oct 29, 2004



All of the albums up to that point are monsters. If you want a nice drive-thru of the early classic material, Standing on the Beach is an excellent compilation record. Kiss Me, Kiss Me, Kiss Me is the album directly preceding Disintegration and it's got a couple of the most popular overplayed singles but still has some stellar deep cuts. Otherwise, I second the notion of just digging into all the LPs and EPs up that Disintegration. Post '89, your mileage will DEFINITELY vary. Wish wasn't bad, but god drat does it have one of my most hated tracks. All the stuff after that, in my opinion, is less memorable attempts at poppier fare and none of the albums hold as much weight as a whole compared to the earlier material. There's a few standout tracks, but nothing really returns to form until Bloodflowers and by that point I found myself not be super vested in the band.

Stick with the classics. They never go out of style.

Cemetry Gator
Apr 3, 2007

Do you find something comical about my appearance when I'm driving my automobile?


Galore, which collects the singles after Standing On the Beach is good too. And as a bonus, most of the singles released from Disintegration have unique mixes, so you got that to look forward to.

I wish Standing on the Beach would be remastered though. Some of those songs sound absolutely dreadful.

Glare Seethe
May 15, 2004

Tenochtitlan, looking east.


hatelull posted:

Wish wasn't bad, but god drat does it have one of my most hated tracks.

I'm going to guess this is Wendy Time. I kind of adore it, though. But Wish was my first Cure album and I love it forever and ever even if I can understand why some don't think much of it. They kind of went a bit alt-rock there for a while but the songs are just so good. Probably could've dropped Cut, though.

I will second Pornography and Head on the Door as the most obvious albums to move on to after Disintegration.

hexwren
Feb 27, 2008



Pornography isn't the sort of album you just jump into head-first, though, unless that's your approach to everything. It is brutal. I agree that it and Head on the Door are next, but maybe you go for Head, first.

Voodoofly
Jul 3, 2002

Some days even my lucky rocketship underpants don't help

Throw another vote for Head on the Door as the next best entry point. Honestly I'd say it's the best entry point period (and their best album overall).

XBenedict
May 23, 2006

YOUR LIPS SAY 0, BUT YOUR EYES SAY 1.


Kvlt! posted:

Where do I start with the Cure if the only album I've listened to is Disintegration (which I liked)?

There is also strong merit for Three Imaginary Boys.

Schiavona
Oct 8, 2008



Prince?

El Gallinero Gros
Mar 17, 2010



Dirty Mind

Franchescanado
Feb 23, 2013

If it wasn't for disappointment,
I wouldn't have any appointment.


Grimey Drawer


You're pretty much safe to start with Dirty Mind ('80) and then go chronologically until Lovesexy ('88).

Toe Rag
Aug 29, 2005



XBenedict posted:

There is also strong merit for Three Imaginary Boys.

That album is good, but isn't it way different from the rest of their discography? I've never bothered with anything else, because I am under the impression it is all goth rock.

Cemetry Gator
Apr 3, 2007

Do you find something comical about my appearance when I'm driving my automobile?



What do you know of Prince?

So, 1999 and Purple Rain probably have his absolute biggest songs that you'd probably know, but honestly, when he gets inconsistent in terms of quality, he never gets boring. But that really doesn't happen until the 90s.

Henchman of Santa
Aug 21, 2010


Start with Purple Rain and if you like it dive right into the double album magnum opus Sign O the Times

Kvlt!
May 19, 2012

Now waffles taste good for breakfast but they're not so good to eat in the third period of a hockey game


Iron and Wine?

hatelull
Oct 29, 2004



Kvlt! posted:

Iron and Wine?

Our Endless Numbered Days would be my choice, but only because I like the production over the very much "I did this all on a 4-track in my home" sound that The Creek Drank the Cradle has.

From there, go check out The Shepherd's Dog for a slightly more "plugged in" sound. Both of the two early records are arguably gorgeous mostly acoustic albums, while the third LP gets a bit more livelier.

After that, keep going forward for more of the same. Do check out the b-sides collection for some great cover work.

Radio Spiricom
Aug 17, 2009




all the pre-name change lps are canonical (and for a good reason) but i'll actually divert from the rest of the posters and say get the hits / the b-sides before any lp and then pick and choose from there

his work with / for the time, vanity 6, appollonia, sheila e, etc. really shouldn't be overlooked either

Radio Spiricom fucked around with this message at Jun 7, 2018 around 15:42

Southern Heel
Jul 2, 2004



Listening to Scott Ian of Anthrax's biography and he keeps talking about Kiss - I listened to some of Kiss Alive! and a little of the VH1 "When Kiss ruled the World" - where do I start for the good stuff? Disco strictly not desired.

hexwren
Feb 27, 2008



I hate Kiss. And yet, there are some tunes they do where it's like "gently caress, this is really good, why did these assholes have to be the ones that made it."

Alive I and II are solid live compilations of their vital years, albeit live. Well, "live," I want to say there's some studio touch-up on those records. If you want to dig into the studio stuff, the three album run from Destroyer to Love Gun is probably their most consistent, but they've got listenable singles on most of their 70s records, even the lousy ones.

ultrafilter
Aug 23, 2007

It is time for your viscera to see the light of day!

Kiss did some really fantastic songs and it's worth checking out one of their various best of/greatest hits albums. I've never felt the need to dig deeper, so I can't speak to any individual albums.

hexwren
Feb 27, 2008



ultrafilter posted:

Kiss did some really fantastic songs and it's worth checking out one of their various best of/greatest hits albums. I've never felt the need to dig deeper, so I can't speak to any individual albums.

re: their compilations, "Strutter" is a great tune. "Strutter '78" is the disco version that first popped up on a greatest hits record. Be careful which you pick.

Henchman of Santa
Aug 21, 2010


Kiss’ self titled debut is pretty great

Mummy Napkin
Mar 18, 2018

b double e double r u n beer run

I agree that their debut rules. Check out Ace Frehley's solo album too.

Rubber Biscuit
Jan 21, 2007

Yeah, I was in the shit.

So after reading Cosey Fanni Tutti’s autobiography, I’ve realised Industrial Records labelmates Cabaret Voltaire are a blind spot in my early industrial knowledge. Where to begin with them?

Coil too?

A human heart
Oct 10, 2012



Coil have a lot of variety in their material and not everyone likes everything they did. For the early stuff you could try Horse Rotorvator, which is a great album in any case. From the later albums you could try Love's Secret Domain(kind of a riff on early 90s dance music), Time Machines(really great drone album), Musick to Play in the Dark Vol. 1(the start of their 'moon music' period) or The Ape of Naples(one of their last real albums, lots of song based material), depending on your tastes.

ultrafilter
Aug 23, 2007

It is time for your viscera to see the light of day!

Rubber Biscuit posted:

So after reading Cosey Fanni Tutti’s autobiography, I’ve realised Industrial Records labelmates Cabaret Voltaire are a blind spot in my early industrial knowledge. Where to begin with them?

I'm not really familiar with Cabaret Voltaire, but Red Mecca is a pretty famous album and that's where I'd start.

DasNeonLicht
Dec 25, 2005

"...and the light is on and burning brightly for the masses."

Fallen Rib

Rubber Biscuit posted:

So after reading Cosey Fanni Tutti’s autobiography, I’ve realised Industrial Records labelmates Cabaret Voltaire are a blind spot in my early industrial knowledge. Where to begin with them?

Coil too?

I am not the biggest Cabaret Voltaire fan, but I have done a lot of listening to them over the past year, largely because of what a delight Code (1987) is. I approached them as a fan of EBM and darker dance music, and that album really hit the spot for me. I think their long-standing fans were a little upset because they were perceived as going pop (great interview where they push back against that — "disco sold out to us"), but I think anyone will agree that it's some of the finest, slickest industrial funk ever recorded.

Now, while Code might not be a representative album for them, it was good (and accessible!) enough to play over and over until I was thirsty enough for more of their material to start working my way through their catalog backwards — The Covenant, the Sword and the Arm of the Lord (1985), Drinking Gasoline (1985), Micro-Phonies (1984) (famous for the poster on Ferris Bueller's wall), and The Crackdown (1983). Anything earlier than that is a little too experimental for my taste, but Red Mecca (1981) is supposed to be their masterwork — "a taught, dense, horrific slab lacking a lull" — definitely what I'd steer a Throbbing Gristle fan towards.

I'm interested to read what more serious Cabaret Voltaire fans think.

28 Gun Bad Boy
Nov 5, 2009

Never been to Belgium

DasNeonLicht posted:

I am not the biggest Cabaret Voltaire fan, but I have done a lot of listening to them over the past year, largely because of what a delight Code (1987) is. I approached them as a fan of EBM and darker dance music, and that album really hit the spot for me. I think their long-standing fans were a little upset because they were perceived as going pop (great interview where they push back against that — "disco sold out to us"), but I think anyone will agree that it's some of the finest, slickest industrial funk ever recorded.

Now, while Code might not be a representative album for them, it was good (and accessible!) enough to play over and over until I was thirsty enough for more of their material to start working my way through their catalog backwards — The Covenant, the Sword and the Arm of the Lord (1985), Drinking Gasoline (1985), Micro-Phonies (1984) (famous for the poster on Ferris Bueller's wall), and The Crackdown (1983). Anything earlier than that is a little too experimental for my taste, but Red Mecca (1981) is supposed to be their masterwork — "a taught, dense, horrific slab lacking a lull" — definitely what I'd steer a Throbbing Gristle fan towards.

I'm interested to read what more serious Cabaret Voltaire fans think.

Pretty much this. Red Mecca is definitely the full stop on that early Cabs period. The culmanation of their early sound. All very late 70s reel-to-reel, analogue synthy, noisey and Dubby. If you're into that early Industrial Records/TG vibe, check out Red Mecca and the albums before (Mix Up, and Voice of America). I'm sure you'll love them. I'm also a big fan of their EP Three Mantras, which to me is the beginnings of where they would end up taking their sound post-Rough Trade.

Afterwards the Cabs showed why they were so good with their willingness to enage with and mutate in more contemporary sounds, especially from black American dance music, such as Electro as well as showcasing their own mutant synth-pop aspects (it's easy to forget they came out the same scene as The Human League/Heaven 17-BEF etc). The Crackdown is their first post-Rough Trade album and is a nice transistion between their earlier sound. I always say to folk if you're coming in from the earlier Rough Trade stuff and are apprehensive about their later stuff, try The Crackdown first.

Micro-Phonies which to me still probably remains their best work and definitely a must have. Like I said far more Electro influenced in the majority, with tracks like Sensoria being one of - if not the - best thing they every crafted and one of my favourite every sogs. Between the LP and the Drinking Gasoline EP that is peak Cabs for me. The Covenant, The Sword & The Arm of The Lord continues on that tip, though isn't quite as good to me, though I think that's more because it's coming in behind the fantastic Micro-Phonies. It's still a good album though and has some of their classics tunes such as I Want You.

Code is really good, with all the positives mentioned above. It was produced by Adrian Sherwood, so if you know him and his production work of the time, as well as his On-U Sound Records and like what they do might be a nice pick up point. I'd probably say it's their slickest sounding album though, and definitely their grab at expanding their audience. Doesn't really succeed in that respects, but still really good.

After that it really depends on how much you like House music and Techno. Again going back to the Cabs ability to tune in to black America with Groovy, Laidback & Nasty is very, very influenced by the late 80s Chicago House scene with folk like Marshall Jefferson producing the album. I still like the tunes but to be honest it's probably a bit of a mis-step as if they'd ust stayed home in Sheffield and soaked up more of the Bleep influence it'd probably shine out more nowadays and would't sound quite so date. Though on saying that a lot of it goes towards that angle what with Rob Gordon doing a lot of the mixing (especially the bonus 12" that came with the original LP release), and Richard H. Kirk's familiarity with that scene via his Sweet Exorcist outputs.

Afterwards it all veers into very much proto-IDM kind of stuff with the albums Body & Soul (the last album Stephen Mallinder sang on), Plasticity, International Language and The Conversation. The latter few would easily fit on - and be a equal match to - Warp Records circa their Artificial Intelligence-era. So if you like things like early Aphex Twin, early Autechre, The Black Dog etc then check those out if you can find them. Actually Richard H. Kirk would release a couple LPs on Warp during this time which is well worth picking up. Actually as an aside if you like early Cabs check out Kirk's 1980 solo LP on Industrial Records Disposable Half-Truths

DasNeonLicht
Dec 25, 2005

"...and the light is on and burning brightly for the masses."

Fallen Rib

Here's a serious blindspot for me in my command of 1990s bands — where do I start with The Smashing Pumpkins? Looks like they were pretty much on fire from 1991–1995?

Somebody fucked around with this message at Jul 26, 2018 around 13:38

DasNeonLicht
Dec 25, 2005

"...and the light is on and burning brightly for the masses."

Fallen Rib

COOL CORN
Jun 1, 2003




Buglord

I feel like I might be opening a can of worms with this one but... Swans?

Henchman of Santa
Aug 21, 2010


Sorry, quote and edit are right next to each other and I have to actually leave the thread to make a new post if I hit edit first. Still getting used to mod buttons.

DasNeonLicht posted:

Here's a serious blindspot for me in my command of 1990s bands — where do I start with The Smashing Pumpkins? Looks like they were pretty much on fire from 1991–1995?

That’s correct. Siamese Dream is probably the best starting point. It’s not as sprawling as Mellon Collie (which is also fantastic), coming in around a “concise” 65 minutes and with tons of hits on it.

COOL CORN posted:

I feel like I might be opening a can of worms with this one but... Swans?

To Be Kind for the most recent iteration; The Great Annihilator for the 90s version. Someone with more knowledge than me can make suggestions for the abrasive early era.

A human heart
Oct 10, 2012



COOL CORN posted:

I feel like I might be opening a can of worms with this one but... Swans?

Filth, Cop/Young God and Public Castration Is A Good Idea.

DasNeonLicht
Dec 25, 2005

"...and the light is on and burning brightly for the masses."

Fallen Rib

Henchman of Santa posted:

That’s correct. Siamese Dream is probably the best starting point. It’s not as sprawling as Mellon Collie (which is also fantastic), coming in around a “concise” 65 minutes and with tons of hits on it.

Thank you. I'm not sure why I connect them in my mind, but can anyone recommend a good starting point for Placebo as well? I think I'm trying to channel the older alternative kids I looked up to back then.

regulargonzalez
Aug 18, 2006

More pretentious than thou


DasNeonLicht posted:

Thank you. I'm not sure why I connect them in my mind, but can anyone recommend a good starting point for Placebo as well? I think I'm trying to channel the older alternative kids I looked up to back then.

The coolest kids were listening to Faith No More - Angel Dust, which is easily one of the top 5 albums of the early 90s and arguably the best.

hatelull
Oct 29, 2004



DasNeonLicht posted:

Here's a serious blindspot for me in my command of 1990s bands — where do I start with The Smashing Pumpkins? Looks like they were pretty much on fire from 1991–1995?

Seconding the Siamese Dream recommendation, it's arguably one of the best albums of the 90's. Don't sleep on Gish (the first LP and carries more of a late 60's 70's classic rawk psychedelic sound) and the b-sides collection Pisces Iscariot as well. There are some excellent tracks on those records, and Pisces Iscariot holds up well enough to be a full album on its own even if it really is just b-sides and (at that time) unreleased tracks.

After MCIS, Corgan sort of crawls up his own rear end. He put out some middling to pretty great work (Adore is a good record honest) after the 2 disc sprawl that was Melon Collie and the Infinite Sadness but the quality and content is DEFINITELY not of the same caliber.

DasNeonLicht posted:

Thank you. I'm not sure why I connect them in my mind, but can anyone recommend a good starting point for Placebo as well? I think I'm trying to channel the older alternative kids I looked up to back then.

I'd dig in to their first two records. The self titled has some solid bangers ("Nancy Boy", "36 Degrees", and Coming Home"), while Without You I'm Nothing kicks off with the instantly recognizable stoner by way of T-Rex anthem "Pure Morning."

hatelull fucked around with this message at Jul 26, 2018 around 19:26

hexwren
Feb 27, 2008



Basically everyone here is correct about the Pumpkins and Placebo, but my starting point with the latter was Black Market Music, which is fantastic imo

quadrophrenic
Feb 4, 2011

WIN MARNIE WIN


motorpsycho?


shining was apparently influenced by them to create in the kingdom of kitsch you will be a monster and i can't stop obsessively listening to that album

but

man they have a lot of albums and a lot of them are double albums

Glare Seethe
May 15, 2004

Tenochtitlan, looking east.


quadrophrenic posted:

motorpsycho?

Tough one. They are a bit of a chameleon, the kind of band that can (and does) shift into any style whenever they feel like it and do it pretty convincingly too. I haven't listened to them in years and years and completely lost track of them after 2002 or so so hopefully someone else can complement my post, and I also don't know that Shining album you mentioned so can't match up to that necessarily...

I would go with Timothy's Monster for a more lo-fi indie rock/psych thing: Watersound, The Wheel.

Or Trust Us, for a meatier, heavier sound. There's some monster bass on this record: 577, Mantrick Muffin Stomp.

I think they have some later albums that skew more towards metal, and they had a brief 60s psych California sunshine period (Go To California), but that's when I lost track of them so can't speak much about those.

Also their homage to "Jessica" is one of my favorite instrumentals ever and imo surpasses it: Whip That Ghost. The rest of that album wasn't great though.

Glare Seethe fucked around with this message at Aug 12, 2018 around 08:12

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kingturnip
Apr 18, 2008


quadrophrenic posted:

motorpsycho?


shining was apparently influenced by them to create in the kingdom of kitsch you will be a monster and i can't stop obsessively listening to that album

but

man they have a lot of albums and a lot of them are double albums

They don't really have anything overly jazzy, but Timothy's Monster or Blissard are good indie rock picks from their early period.
If you want something heavier, check out either Trust Us (as mentioned above) or Demon Box.
If you want something more West-Coast Psychedelic Pop, you've got Let Them Eat Cake, Phanerothyme or It's A Love Cult.
If you want something proggier, go for Little Lucid Moments or Still Life With Eggplant.

I am also a big fan of their last couple of studio albums - Here Be Monsters and The Tower. In fact, The Tower would be a good point to start instead of Timothy's Monster or Blissard, as it covers most of the (non-metal) ground they've done in their career. Or there's the Supersonic Scientists compilation they put out a couple of years ago which has something from (I think) every album on.
I own basically their entire catalogue, so hit me up with a PM if you want more specific advice

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