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COOL CORN
Jun 1, 2003

If we vanished tomorrow, no organism on this planet would miss us.
Nothing in nature needs us.




Buglord

Emetic Hustler posted:

I am interested in familiarizing myself with the Melvins. Since they been around for 35+ years and have a pile of records, all probably sounding different, and have influenced plenty of later bands that I've listened to. Where to start? I am probably more partial to the experimental/alternative side than the punk stuff.

Recommendations from oldest to newest:

Bullhead was wildly influential on a lot of stoner rock bands that came later (and the band Boris even took their name from a song on this album!) but it's admittedly a little meander-y.
Houdini is definitely the most accessible album of their early period and a great place to dip your toes in.

Most of the albums of the 90s and early 2000s will sound like some combination of those two. If you want to see how they progressed over time, skip to (A) Senile Animal. That's the first album where they added half of the band Big Business to their lineup, which gave them a much more "rock-forward" sound. I think it reigned in Buzzo's proggy tendencies.

And then you can skip forward another decade and listen to the Bulls and the Bees EP, which I think is a good exemplar of their current sound, which is a bit faster than their old sludgey stuff.

Those are (for me) the milestone albums, but there's a TON of other stuff, so dig in and enjoy

COOL CORN fucked around with this message at 13:15 on Dec 31, 2019

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El Gallinero Gros
Mar 17, 2010



Stag is also good if you want experimental stuff

Junpei
Oct 4, 2015

Pictured: Me being confused by SA.

And also just by things in general.

Okay, so... Usher. I know most of the big hits (Yeah!, DJ Got Us Fallin' In Love, Scream, Confessions Part 2, More), but is there anything worth doing a deep dive on?

Kvlt!
May 19, 2012

I am the Bong and I am here to do the Bong's Work


Controlled Bleeding and Coil?

hatelull
Oct 29, 2004



Kvlt! posted:

Controlled Bleeding and Coil?

For Coil, you might start with the more accessible material. Love's Secret Domain is a stellar record and bounces around between the alternative/industrial dance of the early 90's and some more electronica oriented sound. Go backwards to Horse Rotovator and Scatology if you like what you hear.

For more experimental "magik" fare, maybe skip forward to Musick to Play in the Dark (2 volumes). This will be more ambient droney flavors. Finally, a few of their latter era releases are worth hearing particularly their last studio album The Ape of Naples and The New Backwards.

There are some deep dives that might pique your interest as well. Time Machines is a straight up drone record meant to create "temporal slips." If you're a Nine Inch Nails fan, Recoiled is a four track EP that further deconstructs a few Downward Spiral tracks, similar to the remix of theirs that appeared on Fixed.

hatelull fucked around with this message at 20:58 on Jan 6, 2020

Fors Yard
Feb 15, 2008

Aside from getting shot in the head, David, what have you done with yourself?


Turbinosamente posted:

Mostly listen to electronic (lately early stuff from the 60s/70s) and rock with forays into heavy metal and more recently psychedelic/acid rock.

Tangerine Dream might be of interest (if that hasn't been covered already by your 60s/70s electronic). Phaedra, Rubycon, Ricochet and Stratosfear are them at their best (in my opinion). The albums before are a lot more experimental but any of those are good places to start.

Junpei
Oct 4, 2015

Pictured: Me being confused by SA.

And also just by things in general.

Joan Jett. (both with the Blackhearts and solo). All I know is I Love Rock And Roll and Bad Reputation.

ultrafilter
Aug 23, 2007

It is time for your viscera to see the light of day!

Joan Jett started out in a band called The Runaways along with fellow 80s star Lita Ford. They had a minor hit with "Cherry Bomb" but I don't think there's much else worth listening to unless you really like that.

As far as her solo career goes, her first two albums "Bad Reputation" and "I Love Rock and Roll" are maybe worth checking out, but honestly I think this is a case where a best of compilation is your best bet.

algebra testes
Mar 5, 2011




Lipstick Apathy

The Germs GI for a look into her production career.

XBenedict
May 23, 2006

YOUR LIPS SAY 0, BUT YOUR EYES SAY 1.



ultrafilter posted:

Joan Jett started out in a band called The Runaways along with fellow 80s star Lita Ford. They had a minor hit with "Cherry Bomb" but I don't think there's much else worth listening to unless you really like that.

You're just going to glaze over future Bangle Micki Steele?

I think you're selling The Runaways a bit short. The eponymous album is pretty solid.

Terminally Bored
Oct 31, 2011



Runaways s/t LP is Kim Fowley's best work.

Turbinosamente
May 29, 2013

Lightning!


Fors Yard posted:

Tangerine Dream might be of interest (if that hasn't been covered already by your 60s/70s electronic). Phaedra, Rubycon, Ricochet and Stratosfear are them at their best (in my opinion). The albums before are a lot more experimental but any of those are good places to start.

No they haven't, thanks for this. Normally almost borderline too chill for me, but after the past couple of weeks I could probably use the relaxing music.

A human heart
Oct 10, 2012



Kvlt! posted:

Controlled Bleeding and Coil?

Controlled Bleeding's main characteristic is that they've varied wildly in sound and style over the years, so there's not really a definitive album as such. The most famous stuff is probably the harsh noise material from the 80s which you can find on albums like Distress Signals, Knees and Bones and a few later archival releases like Bladder Bags And Interludes. In the late 80s they did some weird sort of dark ambientish material, I'm not very familiar with this period. In the early to mid 90s they did some more rock oriented gothy dance stuff, including some releases on Wax Trax. The most recent albums are kind of like weird proggy noise rock but I haven't really checked much of that out either, and there are also random one off albums in their discography that don't sound like much else, like for example Dub Songs from a Shallow Grave which is sort of a mixture of industrial sounds and dub influences.

Junpei
Oct 4, 2015

Pictured: Me being confused by SA.

And also just by things in general.

Since these two bands are linked: Joy Division and New Order

algebra testes
Mar 5, 2011




Lipstick Apathy

Junpei posted:

Since these two bands are linked: Joy Division and New Order

New Order would be Singles. A lot of their best work they released independent of their albums so that would be the start. Power, Corruption & Lies is their most revered work but any of those first three albums (including Movement and Low-Life) are solid.

Joy Division is Serious Business and I don't know enough to help.

Ninja edit: the songs Love Will Tear Us Apart, Transmission, She's Lost Control and Dead Souls are my go to Joy Division songs but I think they are spread around various singles collections and albums.

algebra testes fucked around with this message at 05:28 on Jan 17, 2020

ultrafilter
Aug 23, 2007

It is time for your viscera to see the light of day!

Joy Division only has two actual albums. What do you miss if you just listen to those?

My Lovely Horse
Aug 21, 2010




3/4 of those go to songs, for one thing

Unknown Pleasures is as good a point to jump in as any. It's iconic, easy to procure, and if you don't like Unknown Pleasures you won't like much of what else Joy Division have to offer.

If you do, get Closer and a Best Of collection like Substance or the 2008 Best Of Joy Division. If you're still hungry for more then, go on Discogs and see what you're missing from the early singles, cause you'll be 90% of the way to a complete collection. Unless you want to get deep into like alternate takes and demos but eeeh (although the TV version of She's Lost Control, from a show named Something Else, is extremely good, check that out on youtube).

One slightly obscure release is a self-titled compilation from when they named themselves Warsaw. It's more straight punk than their later typical sound but there's good stuff on there.

hatelull
Oct 29, 2004



Junpei posted:

Since these two bands are linked: Joy Division and New Order

Easy answer: Both bands put out a compilation titled Substance. Start with those. If you like what you hear, dig into the studio albums. Easy for Joy Division, since as they mentioned they only had two LPs. For New Order, all the early records up to an including Technique are bangers. They lose the plot ever so slightly with Republic, which correlated with the demise of Factory Records and the band fracturing due to inner turmoil. They wouldn't put out another record for 8 years, and everything released since has been supremely derivative.

Toe Rag
Aug 29, 2005



algebra testes posted:

Joy Division is Serious Business

Can you elaborate on this opinion? It reminds me of an article I saw around the 30th “anniversary” of Ian’s death (which for some reason we commemorate) about the “enduring influence” of Joy Division on literally everything artistic, from photography to literature, as if Joy Division were the most important band of the last 40 years, and I’m not sure they are.

Don’t get me wrong: Joy Division is excellent and everyone should listen to them, but there is a really weird beatification of Ian and gross glamorization of his depression and suicide, and as a result, the elevation of Joy Division. They were a really good post punk band, but I think that’s about it.

Terminally Bored
Oct 31, 2011



Toe Rag posted:

Can you elaborate on this opinion? It reminds me of an article I saw around the 30th “anniversary” of Ian’s death (which for some reason we commemorate) about the “enduring influence” of Joy Division on literally everything artistic, from photography to literature, as if Joy Division were the most important band of the last 40 years, and I’m not sure they are.

Don’t get me wrong: Joy Division is excellent and everyone should listen to them, but there is a really weird beatification of Ian and gross glamorization of his depression and suicide, and as a result, the elevation of Joy Division. They were a really good post punk band, but I think that’s about it.

Not sure if they were the most important (who was?) but their influence really was huge. They are a post-punk band people will know even if they never heard of Mekons or The Fire Engines and think The Fall really was MES with someone random on bongos. Lots of JD stuff remains iconic to this day: the album covers, the sparse production, Curtis delivery. There were tons of bands since that rode on that aesthetic alone, some still do.

DasNeonLicht
Dec 25, 2005

"...and the light is on and burning brightly for the masses."

Fallen Rib

I really wish there was some way people could still listen to this program that aired on the BBC last year for the 40th anniversary of the release of Unknown Pleasures. As someone who takes Joy Division entirely too seriously, I was ecstatic to hear listeners describe in the most sublime terms how deeply they felt the band's album captured the bleak otherworldliness of the Manchester and greater post-industrial Britain in 1979. From this beautifully written contemporaneous review:

Jon Savage posted:

Joy Division's spatial, circular themes and Martin Hannett's shiny, waking-dream production gloss are one perfect reflection of Manchester's dark spaces and empty places: endless sodium lights and hidden semis seen from a speeding car, vacant industrial sites — the endless detritus of the 19th century — seen gaping like rotten teeth from an orange bus. Hulme seen from the fifth floor on a threatening, rainy day... This is not, specifically, to glamourise; it could be anywhere. Manchester, as a (if not the city of the Industrial Revolution, happens only to be a more obvious example of decay and malaise.

I think that aesthetic either resonates with you or it doesn't. And if it does, it's hard to escape the synchronicity. I tried to capture the words of Peter Saville, who designed the album's cover, on the program at the time:

https://twitter.com/sodiumlitskies/...925455631462402

And not just British contemporaries of Joy Division, but it was incredible to hear the host read messages from people all over the world of different generations who wrote about how much the album and band meant to them. As an extremely lonely and anxious kid in college, I spent many weekend afternoons on my bed listening to the album and trying to understand it. Not to stretch the metaphor too far, but it really is a certain kind of dark matter with an inexplicable gravity that draws people to the mythos.

El Gallinero Gros
Mar 17, 2010



Terminally Bored posted:

Not sure if they were the most important (who was?) but their influence really was huge. They are a post-punk band people will know even if they never heard of Mekons or The Fire Engines and think The Fall really was MES with someone random on bongos. Lots of JD stuff remains iconic to this day: the album covers, the sparse production, Curtis delivery. There were tons of bands since that rode on that aesthetic alone, some still do.

Specifically, his gran?

A human heart
Oct 10, 2012



what exactly is 'spatial, circular themes' supposed to mean?

Terminally Bored
Oct 31, 2011



El Gallinero Gros posted:

Specifically, his gran?

Read The Big Midweek if you haven't already. Legit one of the best music autobiographies out there.

Or the recent Have A Bleedin Guess, Paul Hanley is great too.

El Gallinero Gros
Mar 17, 2010



Terminally Bored posted:

Read The Big Midweek if you haven't already. Legit one of the best music autobiographies out there.

Or the recent Have A Bleedin Guess, Paul Hanley is great too.

I haven't but I've heard Smith's quote about "If it's me and yer gran on the bongos, it's the Fall", which is really funny and a touch egocentric

Terminally Bored
Oct 31, 2011



El Gallinero Gros posted:

I haven't but I've heard Smith's quote about "If it's me and yer gran on the bongos, it's the Fall", which is really funny and a touch egocentric

That's what I was referring to when talking about JD. Smith loved saying that even though it was completely untrue. Smith's solo album (and stuff like Papal Visit) is easily the worst Fall-related release.

Ras Het
May 23, 2007

when I was a child, I spake as a child, I understood as a child, I thought as a child - but now I am a man.


It's pretty obvious that MES wasn't trying to do something Fall-like with the solo records or the records with that Ed whatshisname so I don't know how they invalidate the fact that Fall was a band built around him

Terminally Bored
Oct 31, 2011



The last incarnation was, sure. They basically all agreed they will do everything MES says and not protest even when he did his awful amplifier knob turning shtick on stage.

But other than that people either learned how to work around his bullshit (infamous idea by Smith to master a track from a cassette that made Leckie abandon the band after Bend Sinister) or did their own thing entirely like writing their own songs for which Smith only contributed lyrics and vocals (despite the credits saying otherwise, again - read Have A Bleeding Guess where Hanley explains how that worked and how he got to the real song credits). He was the only constant member, but The Fall was way way more than him alone.

Junpei
Oct 4, 2015

Pictured: Me being confused by SA.

And also just by things in general.

Two incredibly sarcastic female British pop stars: Sophie Ellis-Bextor and Lily Allen. The former, I know "If This Ain't Love" and "Murder On The Dancefloor", the latter, "Smile" and "gently caress You".

Pitwar
Jul 19, 2008

Who's your mate?!


Junpei posted:

Two incredibly sarcastic female British pop stars: Sophie Ellis-Bextor and Lily Allen. The former, I know "If This Ain't Love" and "Murder On The Dancefloor", the latter, "Smile" and "gently caress You".

As far as Sophie Ellis-Bextor goes, she was in a band called Theaudience early in her career. They had one self titled album which is pretty good.

The standout hit from that was A Pessimist Is Never Disappointed.

Teach
Mar 28, 2008



Pillbug

Junpei posted:

Two incredibly sarcastic female British pop stars: Sophie Ellis-Bextor and Lily Allen. The former, I know "If This Ain't Love" and "Murder On The Dancefloor", the latter, "Smile" and "gently caress You".

If you like that kind of thing but with an edge, you could try Black Box Recorder, especially their first album, England Made Me. Just the most deliciously sweet, cut-glass English vocals from Sarah Nixey, singing fairly dark lyrics. Music by Luke Haines (The Auteurs) and John Moore (JAMC). (First album also includes a cover of Up Town Top Ranking, originally by Althea and Donna.)

Child Psychology - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HN8CPj9AkX4
Girl Singing In The Wreckage - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1SAiznIILmE

"Life is unfair, kill yourself or get over it"

regulargonzalez
Aug 18, 2006
UNGH LET ME LICK THOSE BOOTS DADDY HULU YES YES GIVE ME ALL THE CORPORATE CUMMIES ADBLOCK USERS DESERVE THE DEATH PENALTY, DON'T THEY DADDY?
WHEN THE RICH GET RICHER I GET HORNIER


Does Pat Benatar have more to offer than her radio hits?

Junpei
Oct 4, 2015

Pictured: Me being confused by SA.

And also just by things in general.

LL Cool J. All I know is "Mama Said Knock You Out" and "Rock The Bells". Anything else worth looking at?

JollyBoyJohn
Feb 13, 2019



Junpei posted:

LL Cool J. All I know is "Mama Said Knock You Out" and "Rock The Bells". Anything else worth looking at?


His big other hit single was "Something like a Phenomenon" but I'm also a fan of "Deepest Blue (shark fin)" from the Deep Blue Sea soundtrack

XBenedict
May 23, 2006

YOUR LIPS SAY 0, BUT YOUR EYES SAY 1.



The “Bigger and Deffer” album is pretty good. You can look forward to classic rhymes like this:

”J” posted:

I know a fat girl, she wears a orange skirt
You give her twenty dollars and you can do work
She'll take food stamps and a traveller's check
Because her hair and her face and her life's a wreck

Franchescanado
Feb 23, 2013


If it wasn't for disappointment,
I wouldn't have any appointment.





Grimey Drawer

I know no one's requested this, but I've had two separate friends ask me for a playlist to get them into The Beatles.

So I've made a 50+ song playlist mostly of lesser-known songs and deeper cuts (without being too insular) with a few of the big recognizable hits to balance it out.

"Beatles Sold" on YouTube playlist and here is "Beatles Sold" on Spotify

Hope it helps anyone too afraid to ask.

XBenedict
May 23, 2006

YOUR LIPS SAY 0, BUT YOUR EYES SAY 1.



Franchescanado posted:

I know no one's requested this, but I've had two separate friends ask me for a playlist to get them into The Beatles.

So I've made a 50+ song playlist mostly of lesser-known songs and deeper cuts (without being too insular) with a few of the big recognizable hits to balance it out.

"Beatles Sold" on YouTube playlist and here is "Beatles Sold" on Spotify

Hope it helps anyone too afraid to ask.

Not bad, but it needs 100% more "Baby You're a Rich Man" and "Rain"

Franchescanado
Feb 23, 2013


If it wasn't for disappointment,
I wouldn't have any appointment.





Grimey Drawer

XBenedict posted:

Not bad, but it needs 100% more "Baby You're a Rich Man" and "Rain"

You know what. You're right and they've been added.

hatelull
Oct 29, 2004



Without cheating and simply posting the entire medley from Abbey Road, I think “You Never Give Me Your Money” and “Carry That Weight” are sorely lacking in your list.

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Franchescanado
Feb 23, 2013


If it wasn't for disappointment,
I wouldn't have any appointment.





Grimey Drawer

hatelull posted:

Without cheating and simply posting the entire medley from Abbey Road, I think “You Never Give Me Your Money” and “Carry That Weight” are sorely lacking in your list.

You Never Give Me Your Money is for-sure on there, but I’ll add Carry That Weight!

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