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funkcroquet
Nov 29, 2004



Der Kommissar posted:

Sonic Youth
Throbbing Gristle

SY: Daydream Nation, Sister and EVOL in that order
TG: Second Annual Report and 20 Jazz Funk Greats

Pibborando San posted:

No one can help me?

A Tribute to Jack Johnson, On the Corner and Agharta are the best of Davis' fusion period besides Bitches Brew, and if you like them, try the Cellar Door sessions box and any number of the other live albums from the early 70s. Herbie Hancock's albums on Warner Brothers (they're in a 2-disc set on CD) are spacey and masterful and similar to Bitches Brew for the most part. For the most part, you can safely ignore Weather Report, Return to Forever and the other pop-fusion bands.

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funkcroquet
Nov 29, 2004



Jive One posted:

This may be a long-shot, but is anyone knowledgeable about traditional/classical Chinese music? By that I mean mostly non-modern music that's regarded over there similar to how European classical music is regarded in the west. Western classical music can be easily learned by structuring it into periods(Medieval, Baroque, Romantic, etc...) and then looking at how things changed from period to period. Does any such structure exist for the development of highly-regarded music in China? Who are the important composers?

Youtube has a few samples of such music but without structure and context they might as well be beautiful novelty songs.

I'm afraid I can't help you with names but as far as I know, Chinese society before substantial Western influence (1800-1900 onward) didn't think of their "composers" the way we venerate Brahms and Beethoven et al; my very limited understanding of pre-modern Chinese "classical" is that socially, composers were looked at like artisans/craftsmen rather than towering artists, and what has been preserved is mostly folk songs and regime-serving pieces, so you might have trouble finding the names of composers who are venerated for both technical and artistic/expressive reasons like Bach in the west. I might be completely wrong about the anonymity issue, though, so someone might be able to correct me.

I do know that you should be able to find a history of Chinese opera with a little research, which has been popular and evolving for a thousand years or more in China.

funkcroquet
Nov 29, 2004



1000 umbrellas posted:

What about Coil?

Just start at the beginning, with 'Scatology' and 'Horse Rotorvator.'

quote:

What about really anything industrial? I'm a huge fan of Nine Inch Nails but I've never really explored the genre at all.

do you like these?:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wCX6KvfIovU
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y8klW9trVTQ

if so, get the albums they are on - 'Zeichnungen des Patienten O. T.' and '20 Jazz Funk Greats', respectively.

funkcroquet
Nov 29, 2004



Juttman posted:

Any Brian Eno other than Here Come the Warm Jets?

I really liked this album, but I've heard his other stuff is hard to get in to.

The other three rock albums from that era ('Taking Tiger Mountain', 'Another Green World' and 'Before and After Science') aren't notably more difficult than the first one - I mean, it's still anchored firmly in pop. 'My Life in the Bush of Ghosts' is wonderful too, basically the flip side of those early 80s Talking Heads records. Maybe the ambient music is difficult if you've never heard any before, but 'Ambient 1' is probably one of the better intros to that genre anyway - that, 'Apollo' and Tangerine Dream's 'Phaedra.'

funkcroquet
Nov 29, 2004



REDICULOUS LOOSER posted:

Please try to buy the CDs if possible to support these wonderful musicians!

Why? Most of them are dead, if you haven't noticed.

funkcroquet
Nov 29, 2004



REDICULOUS LOOSER posted:

Their widows/sons/daughters aren't. They often own the rights and license the music.

Okay, but that's a separate issue entirely. Before you were talking about rewarding the effort of playing and recording and now you're talking about supporting an inheritance, they're both clearly good but one is a much stronger argument than the other and a different one besides, especially if you're remotely critical about IP laws and copyright.

Here's an alternative view: pirate the piss out of albums by dead people so that you can follow the genre to the point where you can give support to the adventurous contemporary post-bop, free jazz and free improv musicians who need it more than copyright holders who had very little to do with the creative acts in the first place, assuming a non-unlimited budget.

funkcroquet
Nov 29, 2004



Amazon Review posted:

At the behest of my roommate, I've really been enjoying Can and Kraftwerk, particularly Can. Any recommendations for lesser known krautrock artists would be greatly appreciated.

dig through this if you have time. http://myweb.tiscali.co.uk/ultimath...autrockers.html most of what sounds good described here actually is good if you stick to 1968-1977ish.

funkcroquet
Nov 29, 2004



Reichstag posted:

Where to start with choral music in general? Any groups to look for recordings from, compilations, etc?

I enjoy Palestrina's Missa Pro Defunctis and Motets, and some of the Red Army Choir's recordings, but don't know where to go next.

Don't have time to type up an essay so I can't be as helpful as I'd like but here's an abbreviated brain dump:

Palestrina was a relatively late Renaissance composer. If you especially like that style of polyphony go back a little to the Franco-Flemish School (wiki them I guess), des Prez, Dufay and Ockeghem are the most famous people there. Check Ockeghem's Missa prolationum. Also check the late English Renaissance composers, William Byrd and Thomas Tallis (youtube 'Spem in alium', play it loud).

Moving forward, Bach has days and days worth of vocal music, I would eventually get to the oratorios and passions but check the B minor Mass first. Also Handel's Messiah. I know fuckall about baroque choral music besides that.

Classical/Renaissance: big points here are the Mozart, Berlioz, Brahms and Verdi Requiems (go youtube the Dies Irae from the Verdi with Pavarotti singing, gogogo NOW), Beethoven's Missa Solemnis is predictably great and so are the Bruckner masses and motets, there's also choral symphonies of which Mahler wrote a few. Lots of other Brahms secularish choral music and a capella group pieces too. Almost all of Schoenberg and Webern's choral pieces are worth checking out too, just pull up a composition list and throw some darts.

if you want anything more modern than that, find a way to bug me later and I'll give you more recs.

funkcroquet fucked around with this message at 18:55 on Jan 26, 2010

funkcroquet
Nov 29, 2004



People will tell you either the late 50s/early 60s material or the late 60s/early 70s material. I like the latter more. Heliocentric Worlds, Magic City and Atlantis should be easy to find (if nothing else, almost all of it's on emusic).

funkcroquet
Nov 29, 2004



Jarl posted:

Ludwig van Beethoven. There seems to be a lot of versions and orchestras. Are there any recordings that just eclipse the rest?

Furtwängler and Klemperer, but I guess if you haven't heard the syms at all you'd probably want a slightly higher-fidelity set first. Böhm's DG set is real good, in that case

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funkcroquet
Nov 29, 2004



Citizen Rat posted:

I am certain that this has been asked before, but the subject is overwhelming to me. But where do I start with modern jazz? Went to some clubs that presented themselves as "modern jazz" when in Moscow and really enjoyed it, but I've been having problems finding something similar in the States.

Stock recommendations for post-bop, which is what the orthodoxy is usually talking about when it refers to itself as "modern jazz", are Miles Davis's albums between ESP and Nefertiti/Sorcerer, Coltrane's albums between Giant Steps and A Love Supreme, and Bill Evans' albums up until 1964 or so.

Then branch out into other sessions that the dudes from those albums played on and continue following connections from there.

If that's not the aesthetic you heard and liked, you might be talking about free jazz, old jazz/rock fusion of the mostly good kind, slightly later cheesy R&B/jazz fusion (mid-70s to 80s stuff), or more recent fusion like the super cornball M-Base type stuff, but no way of knowing without more detailed examples.

funkcroquet fucked around with this message at 00:16 on Dec 15, 2015

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