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BlackMK4
Aug 23, 2006

wat.

Megamarm

Motronic posted:

So is that actually a conical washer, or does it have a pronounced lip on it that happens to fit exactly with whatever mount it receives? Because if it's that, those are likely not commonly made parts and could be all the way to custom for that assembly.

You probably could figure out a way to jig something up to kinda sorta draw out fender washers to fit depending on what you have laying around the shop (that must include a press).

IOwnCalculus posted:

Is the idea that they slot into those rounded out spaces in those brackets? I'm inclined to agree that those look like custom-machined pieces.

If they were thin I'd think maybe belleville washers but those are usually for adjusting tension, not locating.

I haven't actually held the original ones in my own hands, but I was hoping/assuming that they were some kind of off the shelf conical washer that was tacked to the bolt head with a captive metal spacer covering the threads on the bolt that the other bracket slipped over.

Ah well, I think you're right about the fender washer and press idea. I'll see what I can come up with. . I guess it isn't that big of a deal either way, more of a convenience factor than anything.

BlackMK4 fucked around with this message at 23:34 on May 30, 2020

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Achtane
Apr 2, 2008


Thanks dudes re: engine hoist stuffs!
I'll have to do a little looking but it certainly seems safest to go with a high powered jack. Not that I plan on lifting ridiculously heavy poo poo, but you never know.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





BlackMK4 posted:

I haven't actually held the original ones in my own hands, but I was hoping/assuming that they were some kind of off the shelf conical washer that was tacked to the bolt head with a captive metal spacer covering the threads on the bolt that the other bracket slipped over.

Ah well, I think you're right about the fender washer and press idea. I'll see what I can come up with. . I guess it isn't that big of a deal either way, more of a convenience factor than anything.

When you're dealing with what appears to be a reasonably high-end aftermarket part, custom-machined components aren't too uncommon. I had to pay Novak $24 for some hardware for a cable shifter because their design depends on some custom stepped bushings and rod ends that I couldn't find anywhere else.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


That's one reason I'm allergic to aftermarket car parts where I can parts bin something from somewhere else. Half the time I'm stuck waiting for the manufacturer (hope they are still in business) or an online vendor like McMaster for parts instead of being able to get it anywhere.

Achtane posted:

I grabbed a heavy duty engine hoist off the side of the road (and mostly fit it into the back of my 1995 Corolla, which made for the scariest drive home of my life). Looks like it's in good shape, minus the jack thing, which is missing.

I see that there are replacement jacks for hoists online, but my possibly stupid question is this:
The hoist is rated for 2000LB.
So do I just get a 2000LB jack to fit onto it? Or is it like...since the boom extends out, do I actually need a jack rated higher than that to compensate for the fully extended boom? Am I being dumb?

As noted you probably want the 3 ton at least. Bear in mind you need to measure the extended and collapsed lengths you'll need for full extension and lowered boom, too, or you might install the jack and realize you're screwed.

This is not my tool, but I'll be able to use it as soon as it's up and running. Man I can't wait. 22ish X travel, 16ish Y, can't remember Z but it's decent, with rotary 4th axis and 16 slot tool changer. I just helped my hangar-mate move it into position and get it set up and test powered yesterday. It's 35 years old but works great.

Dacheat
Feb 21, 2003


I'm looking to track down the tools/know how to be able to crimp my own stainless braided hoses (think brake hoses, fuel lines etc). Any thoughts?

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

High Energy, Good Feeling!



I would recommend just using your local hydraulic shop, there's some cheap hydraulic swaging tools out there, but I wouldn't trust them, and for the real-deal big hydraulic crimpers you're looking at $$$$$.

The process is pretty easy though, the fitting slides up in the hose, you slide your swaging sleeve over the top, then crimp it in place. You can also use something like this they only work on the exact hose they're designed for, and they're not cheap.

Dacheat
Feb 21, 2003


Elviscat posted:

I would recommend just using your local hydraulic shop, there's some cheap hydraulic swaging tools out there, but I wouldn't trust them, and for the real-deal big hydraulic crimpers you're looking at $$$$$.

The process is pretty easy though, the fitting slides up in the hose, you slide your swaging sleeve over the top, then crimp it in place. You can also use something like this they only work on the exact hose they're designed for, and they're not cheap.

Thanks, that explains a lot. and this is not something i'd cheap out on (probably would go mid-range)

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sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...

Fallen Rib

Dacheat posted:

I'm looking to track down the tools/know how to be able to crimp my own stainless braided hoses (think brake hoses, fuel lines etc). Any thoughts?

This is a bad idea unless you're doing volume, because

Elviscat posted:

I would recommend just using your local hydraulic shop, there's some cheap hydraulic swaging tools out there, but I wouldn't trust them, and for the real-deal big hydraulic crimpers you're looking at $$$$$.

The process is pretty easy though, the fitting slides up in the hose, you slide your swaging sleeve over the top, then crimp it in place. You can also use something like this they only work on the exact hose they're designed for, and they're not cheap.

of exactly this. We used the fittings with pre-attached crimp sleeve, which is preferable in most cases.

Dacheat posted:

Thanks, that explains a lot. and this is not something i'd cheap out on (probably would go mid-range)

Smart idea. It'll be cheap to have a shop do them, assuming they're well-equipped.
I've run hundreds of hydraulic hoses and use a manual pump crimper to put the ends on them. It sucks rear end, take forever, and is not fun even with the "proper" tools. We were working in a boat, where the lines often ran through spaces without enough room for the fittings, so we were pretty much stuck doing it this way. I do not recommend it.
Parker 387TC hose and Steel fittings sealed with glue-lined heatshrink or Petro-tape all the way...

Measure everything twice, take good notes, and go to a line shop. They'll knock them out with great results for less than you'd expect.

sharkytm fucked around with this message at 16:03 on Jun 2, 2020

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