Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us money per month for bills, and since we don't believe in showing ads to our users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
 
  • Post
  • Reply
ease
Jul 19, 2004

HUGE

Looks like you could paint with it, and use it to inflate an air mattress too.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

FireTora
Oct 6, 2004



A friendly tip from me. If you ever need a valve spring compressor that isn't this style.

Order one online a week ahead of time. I tried 3 Sears, 2 Kragens, 1 monument, 1 pepboys and Harbor freight and none of them had the other styles. So now I must put off finishing putting my bike back together for another weekend while i wait for my new tool to arrive.

grover
Jan 23, 2002

PEW PEW PEW







FireTora posted:

A friendly tip from me. If you ever need a valve spring compressor that isn't this style.

Order one online a week ahead of time. I tried 3 Sears, 2 Kragens, 1 monument, 1 pepboys and Harbor freight and none of them had the other styles. So now I must put off finishing putting my bike back together for another weekend while i wait for my new tool to arrive.
PROTIP: Autozone and advance auto parts have free loaner tools. Nice high quality ones, too You put down a deposit for the value of the tools, and get refunded when you return them.

Tony Macaroni
Sep 9, 2008

by Fragmaster


Harbor Freight's brake caliper tool made changing my rear pads a peice of cake, took only 20 minutes per side.

ease
Jul 19, 2004

HUGE

I have a husky 26 gallon oiless compressor, 1.5hp. Someone is offering to trade me a 240v 6hp craftsman 33 gallon that is just a little older. Think I should go for it?

FireTora
Oct 6, 2004



ease posted:

I have a husky 26 gallon oiless compressor, 1.5hp. Someone is offering to trade me a 240v 6hp craftsman 33 gallon that is just a little older. Think I should go for it?

If it doesn't have any issues it'll give you a lot more air than your current one can.

Edit: looks like it does 15.0 SCFM at 40 PSI, 11.5 SCFM at 90 PSI

grover
Jan 23, 2002

PEW PEW PEW







The big question is: how will you use it? Your little one is weak, but can plug into any outlet. The 240V one is a better, more powerful unit, but restricted to 240V outlets. It'll also make the lights in your house dim a little whenever it kicks on, heh.

EvilDonald
Aug 30, 2002

I'm the urban spaceman, baby.

Tony Macaroni posted:

Harbor Freight's brake caliper tool made changing my rear pads a peice of cake, took only 20 minutes per side.

I like this brake caliper tool, myself:

http://tinyurl.com/6gc39v

ease
Jul 19, 2004

HUGE

Have you ever done rear disc brakes? On most foreign cars (not sure about US) you need to push in and rotate at the same time because of the screw type e-brake mechanism.

On the compressor thing, yeah I'm going to do it. Mine only gets 6 and 9 SCFM. I have 240 outlet in my garage I wired up for testing a hot tub that I no longer use

ease fucked around with this message at 23:50 on Oct 26, 2008

Tony Macaroni
Sep 9, 2008

by Fragmaster


ease posted:

Have you ever done rear disc brakes? On most foreign cars (not sure about US) you need to push in and rotate at the same time because of the screw type e-brake mechanism.

Exactly, some people say you can do it with needle nose pliers but it takes forever and a lot of cursing.

B4Ctom1
Oct 5, 2003

OVERWORKED COCK


Slippery Tilde

sharkytm posted:

PainterofCrap posted:

$60 yard sale score.



Recommendations for 1/2 airline? I plan on piping with galv down to my garage.
Use "L" Copper, not galvanized steel. The price is a little higher, but you won't get steel rusty bits in your air tools and most importantly, any paint job you do, and its easier to work with, just solder it, no need for pipe tape or threaded fittings or having to thread pipe. I'm running my air lines this weekend (hopefully), and I'll take pictures if you are interested.

Copper is outrageously priced these days. It also involves heating and soldering the pipes. edit: also copper does rust too, but too a lesser extent. The smallish amount of copper oxide is much easier to filter out but it still gets into in paint and tools.

The "new school" way of plumbing garage air lines is nylon lines push-lock connectors.


Eastwood sells a ridiculous priced kit for like $200 but gently caress all that. Most industrial parts houses can get you just the pieces you need for much less. All you need to install is a cutter and a cordless screwdriver to mount the hardware to the walls wherever you will need it.

B4Ctom1 fucked around with this message at 18:08 on Oct 27, 2008

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


B4Ctom1 posted:


The "new school" way of plumbing garage air lines is nylon lines push-lock connectors.


Eastwood sells a ridiculous priced kit for like $200 but gently caress all that. Most industrial parts houses can get you just the pieces you need for much less. All you need to install is a cutter and a cordless screwdriver to mount the hardware to the walls wherever you will need it.

Did that poo poo actually get cheaper? We plumbed our compressor through 3 outlets in the garage and two down to the basement all in copper a few years ago. Last I saw that poo poo was still loving astonishingly expensive.

Tomarse
Mar 7, 2001

Grr

Hypnolobster posted:

Did that poo poo actually get cheaper? We plumbed our compressor through 3 outlets in the garage and two down to the basement all in copper a few years ago. Last I saw that poo poo was still loving astonishingly expensive.

Ive just done my bathroom plumbing using push fit connectors and plastic pipe because it was cheaper and easier than copper.
It seems that the main company that make the plumbing speedfit connectors (in the UK anyway) also do compressed air ones and they are similar prices to the plumbing stuff. So this should mean it is cheaper.

UK shop - http://www.tom-parker.co.uk/product...s_categories=11

Rated for 10bar according to the specs on the manufacturers site, so plenty for use on a compressor at home.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



Fallen Rib

B4Ctom1 posted:

Copper is outrageously priced these days. It also involves heating and soldering the pipes. edit: also copper does rust too, but too a lesser extent. The smallish amount of copper oxide is much easier to filter out but it still gets into in paint and tools.

The "new school" way of plumbing garage air lines is nylon lines push-lock connectors.


Eastwood sells a ridiculous priced kit for like $200 but gently caress all that. Most industrial parts houses can get you just the pieces you need for much less. All you need to install is a cutter and a cordless screwdriver to mount the hardware to the walls wherever you will need it.

Copper prices have come down some, and will continue to tumble as the commodity market gets nailed. I own FCX stock, so I know alllll about it.
I checked out push-lock nylon lines, but they aren't rated for pressure continuously (most I've seen here are 5bar burst pressure) if they are inexpensive plumbing parts. The expensive stuff is pressure rated. That stuff you linked to is pressure rated. However, a 10' stick of 1/2" Type L copper is about 13$ here in the US. A 3m (10' appx) piece of the plastic pipe is 7 Euro, which puts it pretty close to 9$. Considering the big jump in the fitting prices (2E for a straight connector, 3E for a 90* bend), copper will still be cheaper.

grover
Jan 23, 2002

PEW PEW PEW







That technology was originally developed for beer lines, and has been adapted all over the place. We used a similar product for air-blown fiber optic cabling; it was rated up to 200psi and holds incredibly firm. The fiber optic stuff was all ridiculously expensive, but there's really no reason it shouldn't be dirt cheap. And man, it's works great and it's sooo easy.

Big K of Justice
Nov 27, 2005

Anyone seen my ball joints?


Pushlocks are great for air lines that don't get moved around too much, ie secured in place to a machine or frame or wall.

I tried a bunch on CTI systems on HMMWV's / H1 and had to switch back to normal Deforming NPT connectors since we'd get air leaks on the hub lines whenever we bent them around to remove wheel assemblies.

You can get your air line and connectors setup from mcmaster.com for cheap.

/edit

As for nylon air lines, go for it, never had problem with the hoses supporting that much PSI over time. One of my buddies with with a compressor system like that in his tool truck. Just make sure the lines you get are supported for the pressure.

EvilDonald
Aug 30, 2002

I'm the urban spaceman, baby.

ease posted:

Have you ever done rear disc brakes? On most foreign cars (not sure about US) you need to push in and rotate at the same time because of the screw type e-brake mechanism.

Nope. Sounds needlessly complicated. [/luddite]

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



Fallen Rib

EvilDonald posted:

Nope. Sounds needlessly complicated. [/luddite]

Its a good system, the ebrake cable just twists the piston, so it screws the pads onto the caliper. Better than a separate ebrake shoe, for sure.

ease
Jul 19, 2004

HUGE

grover posted:

air-blown fiber optic cabling

Not to derail, but airblown FO ?? Is that kinda like how a electrician will suck his pull line through conduit with a vacuum?

Whats the point, so you can just blow another cable through if you ever need to add another?

Suniikaa
Jul 4, 2004

Johnny Walker Wisdom

ease posted:

Not to derail, but airblown FO ?? Is that kinda like how a electrician will suck his pull line through conduit with a vacuum?

Whats the point, so you can just blow another cable through if you ever need to add another?

Because it's faster and pulling on fiber = bad

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cable_jetting

Edit: Jetting story. When my father was working cross Canada installing fiber, one day they were doing a bridge and the jetter wasn't working right. They tied a plastic bag to the fiber and set up a shop vac at the other end then went for lunch. Worked Beautiful.

Suniikaa fucked around with this message at 01:42 on Oct 28, 2008

EvilDonald
Aug 30, 2002

I'm the urban spaceman, baby.

Suniikaa posted:

Edit: Jetting story. When my father was working cross Canada installing fiber, one day they were doing a bridge and the jetter wasn't working right. They tied a plastic bag to the fiber and set up a shop vac at the other end then went for lunch. Worked Beautiful.

Yeah,they make these doojiggers for pulling wire like that. If you have a long conduit to pull through you tie your fish line to this stopper thing and shove it in there, then put a shop vac on the other end to suck it through. I hear they work pretty well.

grover
Jan 23, 2002

PEW PEW PEW







ease posted:

Not to derail, but airblown FO ?? Is that kinda like how a electrician will suck his pull line through conduit with a vacuum?

Whats the point, so you can just blow another cable through if you ever need to add another?
Actually, it's a lot like it. In an air blown fiber install, a series of boxes are installed, with empty hollow multiduct tubes between the boxes, usually in a large generic grid-like network. The installer then goes from box to box, connecting tubes in each box with those little push couplings, until a single pipe is made from point A to point B. They then stick an air compressor on one end and literally blow the fiber through the tube Laminar flow in the tube pushes the fibers so they float in the middle of the cable, and they use a special coating on the fibers so the air grabs them and pulls them along. A special pull-head slowly meters out the fiber, controlling the speed of the blow. It's actually pretty slick, and the fiber will go go right around 90 bends.

The advantage is in flexibility, since places are constantly changing configuration, and this really cuts down on the labor associated with fiber optic installation. Especially with very long runs (1000'+) in buildings, which tend to have a high failure rate of conventional cable due to rough handling.

http://www.blolite.net/
http://www.futureflex.com/

grover fucked around with this message at 02:00 on Oct 28, 2008

ease
Jul 19, 2004

HUGE

^^ - Ah, thats pretty cool.

I heard on stern, and from an old timer, about people working in buildings who'd take a piss in the unwired conduits on new construction sites, rather than go use a portapotty a few floors down. Sometimes poor unsuspecting electricians get a face full of fermented piss when they'd go to put the vacuum on.

ease fucked around with this message at 01:54 on Oct 28, 2008

Christobevii3
Jul 3, 2006


Bosch 10.5V lithium ion impact driver for $12 at lowes! I guess they "updated" it to say 12v on the -2 version, so its 10.8v nominal 12v peak.

http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?acti...01BF&lpage=none

Kynetx
Jan 8, 2003


Full of ignorant tribalism. Kinda sad.


Christobevii3 posted:

Bosch 10.5V lithium ion impact driver for $12 at lowes! I guess they "updated" it to say 12v on the -2 version, so its 10.8v nominal 12v peak.

http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?acti...01BF&lpage=none

Lowes posted:


The page you requested cannot be found.

Click here to visit our homepage.

This error has been automatically logged and will be corrected as soon as possible.

Suniikaa
Jul 4, 2004

Johnny Walker Wisdom

Kynetx posted:



Looks like they took it down, it worked last night. They must have gotten wise to their error.

Tony Macaroni
Sep 9, 2008

by Fragmaster


If you read the huge slickdeals thread it turns out it was a price mistake and the item id was actually for a pack of jigsaw blades. When people went to pick it up they were handed the pack of blades, I don't think anyone actually got the driver.

ease
Jul 19, 2004

HUGE

I was thinking about those air line kits... and then looking at my extra 50' hose that I rarely use, and then I looked over at my jar of big wire staples with plastic guards... so why not just do this on the cheap with T's and a quick connect wherever you want access to it.

You can get 50' coils of airhose for like 20$

Uthor
Jul 9, 2006

Gummy Bear Heaven ... It's where I go when the world is too mean.

My dad picked up a 6 gallon DeWalt compressor (I can't to find it online) for some reason. I mean, he doesn't have a need for one other than filling tires, but whatever. I think it's 1.5 hp.

Anyway, is that big enough for anything useful? I'm pretty sure it's good enough to run a nailer or a stapler. I'm assuming grinders and such are out of the question. Would it be able to handle an impact wrench? It'd be nice to get a cheap one for at least removing lug nuts.

Sterndotstern
Nov 16, 2002

by Y Kant Ozma Post


Uthor posted:

Anyway, is that big enough for anything useful?

Staplers and nail guns for sure. Will drive an impact gun as long as you don't mind letting it catch back up with you every so often. Air hammer and air ratchet for sure, handy when working on cars. Blow guns, I have no idea how I ever washed my car at home without one.

ease posted:

so why not just do this on the cheap with T's and a quick connect wherever you want access to it?

I'm thinking the same thing -- I just enclosed my carport and will be adding a retractable ceiling-mounted air hose. I plan to just run a hose from the compressor, up through my attic, to the ceiling-mounted hose. I'll let you know how that works out.

Sterndotstern fucked around with this message at 20:08 on Dec 4, 2008

frozenphil
Mar 13, 2003

YOU CANNOT MAKE A MISTAKE SO BIG THAT 80 GRIT CAN'T FIX IT!


Uthor posted:

My dad picked up a 6 gallon DeWalt compressor (I can't to find it online) for some reason. I mean, he doesn't have a need for one other than filling tires, but whatever. I think it's 1.5 hp.

Anyway, is that big enough for anything useful? I'm pretty sure it's good enough to run a nailer or a stapler. I'm assuming grinders and such are out of the question. Would it be able to handle an impact wrench? It'd be nice to get a cheap one for at least removing lug nuts.

As Stern said, it will do most of the stuff a weekend mechanic needs. As far as impact wrenches go, a good electric impact will handle lug nuts all day.

ease
Jul 19, 2004

HUGE

Sterndotstern posted:

Staplers and nail guns for sure. Will drive an impact gun as long as you don't mind letting it catch back up with you every so often. Air hammer and air ratchet for sure, handy when working on cars. Blow guns, I have no idea how I ever washed my car at home without one.


I'm thinking the same thing -- I just enclosed my carport and will be adding a retractable ceiling-mounted air hose. I plan to just run a hose from the compressor, up through my attic, to the ceiling-mounted hose. I'll let you know how that works out.

I did that right after I posted it actually. It's only going from one side of my garage to the other but works great. Instead of putting the hose inside the wire thingys, I nailed them in, and used zip ties to secure the house to them.

two_beer_bishes
Jun 27, 2004


My parents are getting me a new air compressor for my birthday and I've picked this one. I will be getting a nice assortment of air tools including an impact wrench. I talked to a guy at Northern Tool today and he said it would be fine for tools but I would "need to do one wheel at a time before letting the compressor refill". I don't ever plan on taking an impact wrench to my wheels, but will I seriously only have a few seconds at a time that I could use an impact wrench?

Edit: I found a better spec'ed compressor at Menards today, how is the Sanborn brand?

two_beer_bishes fucked around with this message at 21:28 on Dec 6, 2008

ryurgin
Nov 29, 2008


Required tools for me to even consider touching any vehicle:

This thing is powerful enough to remove most lugnuts. On a 3/8's drive impact. It's a beautiful thing. My snap-on man hates me because I break more 19mm 3/8's impacts than anyone else he services.

http://buy1.snapon.com/catalog/item...ore&dir=catalog


Everything is better when you have air.

http://buy1.snapon.com/catalog/item...ore&dir=catalog

You'd be surprised how much of a difference a really good light makes for not pissing you off.
http://buy1.snapon.com/catalog/item...ore&dir=catalog

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



Fallen Rib

Well, I've decided to go ahead and upgrade my toolboxes for Christmas. I'll be picking up the 42" HF toolbox, which I've read is really really nice. I've got a 15% off coupon, and its on sale, so it'll be less than $350.
Rollaway: http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ct...temnumber=90320
Reviews: http://weldingweb.com/showthread.ph...596&mode=linear

AnomalousBoners
Dec 22, 2007

by Ozma


two_beer_bishes posted:

My parents are getting me a new air compressor for my birthday and I've picked this one. I will be getting a nice assortment of air tools including an impact wrench. I talked to a guy at Northern Tool today and he said it would be fine for tools but I would "need to do one wheel at a time before letting the compressor refill". I don't ever plan on taking an impact wrench to my wheels, but will I seriously only have a few seconds at a time that I could use an impact wrench?

Edit: I found a better spec'ed compressor at Menards today, how is the Sanborn brand?

That guy is an idiot and Campbell Hausfeld is an entry level brand. Just get whatever is cheapest, you wont be using it much compared to a real shop. I can take all four wheels off with a 20 gallon before refilling. Also why would you never use an impact gun on your wheels?

TheComingCurse
Sep 12, 2003


two_beer_bishes posted:

My parents are getting me a new air compressor for my birthday and I've picked this one. I will be getting a nice assortment of air tools including an impact wrench. I talked to a guy at Northern Tool today and he said it would be fine for tools but I would "need to do one wheel at a time before letting the compressor refill". I don't ever plan on taking an impact wrench to my wheels, but will I seriously only have a few seconds at a time that I could use an impact wrench?

Edit: I found a better spec'ed compressor at Menards today, how is the Sanborn brand?

I would suggest getting a belt driven compressor over a direct drive unit, since the belt driven ones are quieter. I've got a 25 gallon tank on mine and I can use my impact without trouble. It even keeps up decently with my die grinder.

BrokenKnucklez
Apr 22, 2008

by zen death robot


two_beer_bishes posted:

My parents are getting me a new air compressor for my birthday and I've picked this one. I will be getting a nice assortment of air tools including an impact wrench. I talked to a guy at Northern Tool today and he said it would be fine for tools but I would "need to do one wheel at a time before letting the compressor refill". I don't ever plan on taking an impact wrench to my wheels, but will I seriously only have a few seconds at a time that I could use an impact wrench?

Edit: I found a better spec'ed compressor at Menards today, how is the Sanborn brand?

I am pretty sure that the compressor parts from Sanborn and Campbell Hausfeld are the same or close. Still entry level. To be honest, I think your better off finding the best one of the best price. More importantly, check your CFM @ 90 PSI. That is where a majority of air tools operate, and that will determine how long you can run say a die grinder with out waiting for the compressor to fill. Also seconding the idea of a belt drive, much quieter. Though I haven't had much experince with oil less... any thoughts?

usurper
Oct 19, 2003

Sup

I've been buying a few tools from ToolKing.com - decent prices and some of their refurb'd stuff can be a great deal on less-used power tools. They also started putting out a woot-like daily deal system here:

http://www.tooliday.com/

I've picked up a few things - there has been some great deals on items. I've had great service from ToolKing as well. Quick shipping and great service department.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



Fallen Rib

BrokenKnucklez posted:

I am pretty sure that the compressor parts from Sanborn and Campbell Hausfeld are the same or close. Still entry level. To be honest, I think your better off finding the best one of the best price. More importantly, check your CFM @ 90 PSI. That is where a majority of air tools operate, and that will determine how long you can run say a die grinder with out waiting for the compressor to fill. Also seconding the idea of a belt drive, much quieter. Though I haven't had much experince with oil less... any thoughts?
oilless are loud as gently caress. My Craftsman is oilless, and its awful to work around.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply