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Taymar
Oct 11, 2007


I need some jackstands for occasional light use (fluid changes). It's critical that they won't damage the surface they're used on as I'm going to have to borrow someone's driveway to change my oil.

Should I be looking at a certain type of stand, or just put pieces of wood or similar underneath?

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Taymar
Oct 11, 2007


I doubt this will exist, but on the offchance - Anyone know of an inexpensive micro torque wrench?

I bought the smallest one Harbor Freight had (1/4") when it was on sale a while back, but it doesn't go low enough for some jobs I've needed it for.

Ideally I need something that can go to around 12 lb-in, but I'm guessing anything that low with any level of accuracy will be pricey?

Taymar
Oct 11, 2007


Is there anything wrong with setting a cheap clicker torque wrench by the readout on a (more accurate?) beam style one, then using the clicker one for torquing the bolt?

Not an ideal situation by any means, but would this work?

Taymar
Oct 11, 2007


I need a vacuum brake bleeder, and have been advised to get one which runs on compressed air.

I don't have a compressor, and really the only way I'm likely to get one in the near future would be to go with a harbor freight one.

They seem to have a few oil ones for around $100. The brake bleeder I'm looking at is around 150 (vacula).

Is this a horrible idea, and/or is a trigger type vacuum brake bleeder ($60) notorious for being a bad substitute?

Taymar
Oct 11, 2007


sharkytm posted:

Pump-style ones work fine, so long as you keep pumping them to maintain pressure. I've used them a lot. Compressor-fed ones are continuously fed, so they work even better.
Since you don't have a compressor, a hand-pump powered one is fine. Just give it a few squeezes as you are bleeding the brakes.
Protip: Don't forget to securely attach the bleeder hose to the bleeder. Brake fluid is really awful stuff, and can make you pretty sick if it gets all over you, plus it eats paint like nothing else. Teeny-weeny zipties work fine for keeping the hose on.

Thanks for the advice. Would something like this http://www.actron.com/product_detail.php?pid=16292 do the trick? (or any specific brands to look for/avoid?) I will probably only be using it once a year or so.

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Taymar
Oct 11, 2007


I'm an idiot and need to ask this question again because I left out a critical fact.

Looking at vacuum bleeders for a complete brake fluid flush - Are there any larger capacity manual pump ones, or is a compressed air one necessary? I now see that all the hand pump types I've found only hold a few fluid oz of brake fluid, plenty for bleeding but probably nowhere near enough to flush the system. The compressed air systems seem to have a much bigger capacity. I'd also prefer to use a vacuum than a pressure system.

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