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Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

High Energy, Good Feeling!




on the topic of Dremel clone, I have a B&D knockoff that has a motor on a swivel mounted base, with a felxible driveshaft to a little handpiece, and it's loving great, shitloads of torque, and the handpiece is so small it'll fit anywhere.

Don't know the price unfortunately, since it's a hand-me-down from my dad.

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Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

High Energy, Good Feeling!




mod sassinator posted:

Not sure I would trust the ratcheting open end wrench design not to round stuff off and make a mess of bolts. Better to just get proper ratcheting wrenches even if they cost a little more. For just doing a radiator swap you probably don't need fancy ratcheting wrenches though. If you have those annoying hose clamps you might want one of these remote hose clamp pliers: http://www.amazon.com/ABN-Flexible-...se+clamp+pliers I haven't used one but folks here say they are amazing, and after doing some cooling system work without them I can see where they would be incredibly useful.

I've used those "ratcheting" type wrenches quite a bit for work,they're really not as terrible rounding-wise as they seem, but the "ratchet" feature is stupid and makes tightening a bolt under ideal circumstances like 3% faster. I'd just by a regular ol' wrench.

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

High Energy, Good Feeling!




I think I have that exact set, they're ok, on the nicer end of the Chineseum spectrum, shrink works great, but the terminals are a bit anemic.

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

High Energy, Good Feeling!




Lowes has some good deals on big Craftsman sets with no bullshit filler right now.

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

High Energy, Good Feeling!




Or a crescent wrench, or a pair of channel-locks, it only needs to go in once, and maybe come out once more

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

High Energy, Good Feeling!




If you've ever had to torque 20+ bolt flanges, in 20%torque increments for gasket relaxation, that thing would be a loving godsend, or for something like multi-jackbolt tensioners.

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

High Energy, Good Feeling!




Does it not also tighten the bolt for you? Why is it so big then?

And yeah, I was talking about industrial applications.

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

High Energy, Good Feeling!




Platystemon posted:

Father’s Day sales are imminent.

I've seen a lot of tools with "SPECIAL VALUE!" Printed on the side for FD, specifically Dewalt's big miter saw, I'd bet a silver nickel a lot of these sales have tools built down to a lower price point.

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

High Energy, Good Feeling!




Microns, as in 1/1,000,000th of a meter? Or 1/1,000th of a millimeter? Are you sure that's the right unit? If it is, 1/100th of the width of a human hair is likely in the acceptable error range.

What kind of micrometer is it? Digital, Dial? Do you have a link to the ad, or a model number?

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

High Energy, Good Feeling!




Kreez posted:

It's the 208MDZ. It has a rounded anvil but is otherwise nothing fancy.
http://www.starrett.com/metrology/product-detail/208mdz

The graduations are 10μm each, and with the barrel closed the line is at half a graduation. My tightest tolerance I need to hit for the job is +/-25μm, so the meter being off 5μm isn't the end of the world (especially if it's a constant +5μm), but if the error grows as the measurement gets bigger that's a problem obviously. Every other micrometer I've ever used (which is not many, and they've always belonged to someone else) has zeroed out at the 0 line impeccably, but maybe that's just luck.

I'm hunting around to find someone with a set of reliable feeler gauges or something I can test it out on. But if a supposedly brand new Starrett micrometer arriving 5μm out of spec is unheard of and likely a sign that it's maybe a factory reject that "fell" out of the reject bin and onto Amazon, I'll return it and buy from a reputable tool shop (for way more than I found it on Amazon for).

Sorry about the units, I remember someone once telling me that in the English language machining world the only metric unit of measurement used by grizzled greybeards is the micron, supposedly a non-SI unit that is 10μm, which I always thought was pretty stupid. I was trying to be all smart and pretend I know the lingo, but a quick check on the internet shows zero evidence that there is any colloquial unit of measurement equal to 10^-5m, let alone it being called a micron. So either that guy was a moron, or more likely I'm a moron and misunderstood him.

edit: I know I can adjust the zero, but my main concern is now just whether or not the unit not coming zeroed is a major red flag.


Yeah, that style of mic should be absolute zero when zeroed, with a high-quality piece of measurmentation like that 100% return it, I bet if you call Starrett directly they'll exchange it or adjust it for you, and then you can be sure you have the real deal. I'm sure you could just adjust everything by the zero-error, but Starrett should stand behind their products.

The units thing is a pretty easy mistake to make, see loving "mils"

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

High Energy, Good Feeling!




slidebite posted:

That should zero. Since it's resolution is a .010mm I would call that 10 micrometers resolution.

No, it only has 1 micrometer of resolution, because he only has one of them.

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

High Energy, Good Feeling!




Some electronics hacking and a stick welder!

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

High Energy, Good Feeling!




mod sassinator posted:

30A at 14 volts is a good amount of power. Not an extreme amount, but nearly 400 watts continuously is something that needs a bit more thought in its design to handle. Consumer stuff isn't going to add the heavier duty wiring, heat management, etc. to do that.

Why don't you just use a large car battery and charge it 'offline' disconnected from everything with any old dinky trickle charger? Are you really pulling 30 amps continuously at rest with just ignition and such on? That seems pretty extreme--if it's just some computer modules, lights, and a fuel pump pressurizing the lines, etc. I have a hard time seeing that all use ~400 watts of power.

edit: Also why not pull out fuses for things like headlamps? Let the computers think they're turned on but save yourself actually burning them out and wasting the power.

It's probably for the Mercedes suspension calibration, which uses (a) hydraulic pump(s?) to throw the car around in bizarre ways, that can hurt or mangal people in the vicinity, and I imagine draws quite a bit of power.

https://youtu.be/36UcvXlv5QE

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

High Energy, Good Feeling!




I have a $15 closeout special Skil 4 1/2" grinder, and it's ground hundreds of feet of steel, aluminium, concrete, and sometimes wood and plastic over the last 8 years, it's gotten to the point where I'm using it for 10 foot long diamond blade concrete cuts with water lubrication to try and kill the drat thing because I can afford nice tools now and want a better grinder, but I can't justify it because this stupid POS will cut anything.

Also, grinders are one of the few tools left that will outstrip your charging capacity during use, if you're not a coneseur of big batteries and multiple charging stations.

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

High Energy, Good Feeling!




cakesmith handyman posted:

In a bind I've filed grooves into a nut to turn it into a disposable do-or-die er, die.

I've done the same to get steel air and plumbing fittings into brass castings that I've drilled out.

Works once!

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

High Energy, Good Feeling!




I haven't been an electrician in a decade so I'm curious, does Klein still make the Journyman screwdrivers? I still have a set, they're nicer than Wihas, but not quite as nice as Weras, Klein's regular screwdrivers are pretty junky, their regular Linemans and dikes are just o.k., but the 2000 series are my gold standard for lineman pliers, they're made of rock hard tool steel that can cut all day, but they're still huge and hefty so they're good for beating locknuts off still, unlike other high quality cutty tool companies. Knipex loving rock for dikes, need to cut 0000 copper but you left your cable cutters in the truck? Just use like 4 cuts with your diagonal cutters!

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

High Energy, Good Feeling!




I have a heavily forested 2 1/2 acres, and I'd spring for a gas chainsaw, the care and feeding is a little bit of a pain, but I don't think a cordless would have handled the 4 apple trees and a giant 40' Alder that fell during a snow storm and blocked my street during a snow storm that also caused a power outage.

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

High Energy, Good Feeling!




^Milwaukee is supposedly the only battery chainsaw from the major makers that has a decent chain tensioner and bar fastening system, if you're not already in the ecosystem it may not be worth it.

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

High Energy, Good Feeling!




Cat Hatter posted:

Yes, so long as you aren't putting too much strain on it and you're aware that when the bolt/nut catches on something the drill will try to twist itself out of your hands.

In the case of that particular drill-driver, with all the strength of a newborn kitten.

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

High Energy, Good Feeling!




A lot of people like those little drill-drivers for interior screws fwiw.

If you're trying to bust nuts with a power tool it better be an impact, I completely agree using a big drill, like a 20V on the slow speed setting, is just gonna gently caress smash your knuckles.

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

High Energy, Good Feeling!




Rhyno posted:

ANy particular brands I should avoid in extension cords? Looking for the best quality + maximum length.

They're all about the same, the more pliable and thicker the insulation the longer they'll last, if you want a nice one get one with SJOOW stamped on the outside, it means it's a silicone jacket.

Load matters a lot, if you're running a big chop saw or something at 100' you want at least a 12gauge, a welder at 50' you want 10 gauge, weedwacker you want 16 or 14 for better pliability etc.

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

High Energy, Good Feeling!




boxen posted:

And not in a "THAT'S loving AWESOME" direction.

Buncha Debbie Downers I say.


That's why you need the mini oxy-acetylene rig, so you can sneek that poo poo in.

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

High Energy, Good Feeling!




Specifically I think the jiggler ones will only work on a single cylinder engine, since 1-stroke=1-jiggle.

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

High Energy, Good Feeling!




I just don't think the jiggle/rpm/cylinder holds up in multi-cylinder engines, due to harmonics, opposed-pistons etc. Whereas 1-spark always = 1/(n*x) where x is 2 for wasted spark and 1 for not of the total rpm.

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

High Energy, Good Feeling!




meatpimp posted:

I was going to make a joke about an acoustic spectrum analyzer and look for harmonics, but god drat, there really is cell phone apps that supposedly do just that: https://play.google.com/store/apps/...mgauge&hl=en_US

Oh man, working in an industry that has a painful history of exploding tens of millions of dollars worth of spinny bits, this is the only speed measurement technology we use any more, I had no idea the chineseum versions were so cheap, yeah, use this if you can.

Strobotachs are the funnest way to measure speed, because strobe lights are fun, but they're expensive, and ghosting and doubling are a bitch.

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

High Energy, Good Feeling!




Uthor posted:

Pro tip: when torquing small screws, make sure that your torque wrench is actually in-lbs and not ft-lbs.

Luckily it broke a 1/4" above the block and I could easily extract it. Especially since I was bolting into an AL manifold.

"No stop!" I scream as the screw retaining a $50,000 circuit card becomes one with the rail it goes into.

This is indeed, a pro tip.

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

High Energy, Good Feeling!




Colostomy Bag posted:

Sorry for being obtuse, but could you explain more on this situation.

Shock-rated instrumentation cabinet for a nuclear reactor, I was the supervisor for the plant as a whole, but not the card replacement being done, I walk by and notice that the torque wrench the workers are using is a little big for fidgety electronic stuff, and walk up to stop them, right as the eee-eeeek of the threads galling together sounds, and the whole hold-down bolt starts twisting, they had grabbed a ft-lbs wrench, their torque spec was in in-lbs, so they applied 12x the required torque.


They also forgot to put a chip in the card, so it had to be extracted, queue a like 100 hour job stripping every other card in the cabinet, and taping off the data bus connections so that metal shavings from drilling and retapping the hole couldn't get in.

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

High Energy, Good Feeling!




Yeah, it's an unteachable skill as far as I can tell, it makes managing a fleet of guys right out of school who are trusted to use tools for complex jobs pretty challenging, one of those guys will set the torque on the wrench, then just go whole hog, thinking "it's not supposed to torque anymore" once it reaches the setpoint, or they'll have the dial torque wrench needle bound up on the stop, and they'll wonder why it's still indicating 0 when they have 100 ft/lbs on the fastener.

And then there's trying to teach them how to safety-wire....

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

High Energy, Good Feeling!




Just put one of those ISO oils in it, if it's the right viscosity it'll be fine.

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

High Energy, Good Feeling!




I have a Horror Fright $500 TIG/SMAW welder, and it's pretty awesome, good controls, dual voltage, all the components are decent quality and quite rugged, time will tell if it has some fatal flaw, welds pretty good for now though.

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

High Energy, Good Feeling!




Big Hilti or Bosch roto-hammer set to hammer only with a big flat tip blade, and a big hammer.

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

High Energy, Good Feeling!




trouser chili posted:

Any opinion on this dude? I’ve got some money burning a hole in my pocket and I’m really wanting to learn.

I really like the Vulcans for the value, they have good granularity on the controls, hf start, and other nice functions, the torches and clamps are surprisingly nice. Used welders are too expensive, too broken, not on the market long enough, or stolen. If you want a nice import welder Everlast makes nice stuff too. I have a Hobart Mig to supplement the Tig/stick.

It really depends on what you want to do, for gluing together carbon/alloy steels Mig is quickest and easiest, good quality flux wire is low maintenance and easy as pie, here's some cable railing posts I made with Mig.

https://i.imgur.com/caAVJjI.jpg

After the "grinder" portion of "grinder or paint makes me the welder I ain't"



Took the time to chamfer and gap all the joints, so I got fusion through 100% of the metal.

Finished:

Tig is really fun, and it's the most versatile method, and you can weld anything (except Al, if you have DC only) it's very forgiving with settings, and you can always re-run the arc over the bead to pretty stuff up. It's easy to get started but difficult to master.

Here's some Tig on an old trailer we cut up and welded back together in a different way.




Stick is pretty much the only viable process for heavy/structural welding, and is really loving hard.

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

High Energy, Good Feeling!




You can stick weld pretty effectively with a car battery, if you want to, for some reason.

But yeah a standard "tombstone" or "buzzbox" is just a big transformer with a variable tap, and I think some kind of rectification, you would be hard pressed to DIY something for less money.

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

High Energy, Good Feeling!




I'd imagine you'd fry the alternator quick fast and in a hurry if the car was running. Maybe you could cycle the engine to charge the battery between beads?

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

High Energy, Good Feeling!




If the weather's decent and I have time tomorrow I might try it.

E: I could do it with the Propulsion battery on the Leaf, the charger can supply more current than my welder can take. I might end up vaporizing a couple rods before I get the knack though.

Elviscat fucked around with this message at 05:02 on Feb 11, 2020

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

High Energy, Good Feeling!




One Weird Trick Welding Companies Hate!

Weld stuff with your car's battery!

J/K, it doesn't work very well.

3/32 6011 Lincoln rod
#6 Harbor Freight jumper cables/stinger/ground clamp assy. Approx. 8' long.
Duralast GOLD brand battery in a 2002 Ford Ranger.
Some lovely steel I have lying around.

WELD

Ok, it doesn't work worth a poo poo, can't draw a stable arc, all that smoke is from the flux burning up. I thought about surface prep and whatnot, but figured if you were trying this you probably wouldn't have a angle grinder or whatnot anyways.

Here's a better view, when I decided PPE requirements were lower.

https://youtu.be/a2WYZk1Xw0M


Here's some chickens helping me put stuff away.



Anyways, I moved on to trying to use the 300-odd volt Leaf battery, once I got past the electric shock radiating up my arms through the damp leather gloves I had a much different result.

E: oh yeah, also managed to touch that glowing hot electrode with a bare thumb, oops.

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

High Energy, Good Feeling!




Yeah, looks like most welders put out about 60V open circuit, then drop down to 20-30 once the arc's established.

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

High Energy, Good Feeling!




HF's Pittsburgh Pro line is a great value, and their extending 1/2" ratchet is an awesome compromise between a "please come loose" form factor and "you WILL come loose" leverage, I've hopped up and down on mine with my big 250 lb rear end trying to break loose rusted on fasteners in the NE and it's held up fine. Tolerences and durability on all the sockets I've found acceptable, better than HD/Lowes/Part store house brands.

Would I trade the Proto and Snap-on poo poo I use at work for them? No, but they're fine for the hobbiest.

If you want to compromise, buy the long 1/2" Snap-on ratchet to keep with your kit, that's my favorite ratchet in the world.

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

High Energy, Good Feeling!




I have snapped several bolts in non-torque critical applications because I have a tendency to grab the big snappy 1/2" and an adapter instead of the garbo big-tooth SK 3/8ths ratchets, because all 5 of our 3/8ths Proto ratchets grew fuckin' legs and walked out of our toolbox.

I have also spent hours with a large socket on the Snap-on just spinning it around and around, not like at a time, but collectively.

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Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

High Energy, Good Feeling!




The Door Frame posted:

Here's one that I feel foolish asking about, but how on earth do I find out the reputability and reliability of not Miller/Lincoln/Hobart welding brands/machines?
Every review is stacked with Amazon affiliate links or is another Harbor Freight clickbait video and it's frustrating to know so little when you're looking at >$2k machines

I'm finding some Everlast TIG welders that are perfectly in my price range, with good enough duty cycles and the necessary features of high AC output and >60hz pulsed DC, but I don't know if there's a good reason that it's nearly $1000 less than a comparable Miller machine. Besides the obvious fact that one is blue and one isn't (or red or orange)

Everlast is a pretty good brand, even semi-professionals like Abom79 use them and seem to like them.

Try welding forums if you want to see a combination of people saying they're the best welders ever, and people saying they're junk and will explode on your second weld

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