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Black88GTA
Oct 8, 2009


I just bought a fiberoptic borescope with 3.5" wireless LCD monitor and SD-card video recording capability.

While on a mundane run to Home Depot to buy an extension cord and bolts, a Milwaukee branded borescope with a small attached screen caught my eye. Looked cool, but I'm not spending $250 on that - even though the number of times something like this would have come in incredibly handy, and the time it would have saved me to have it when I needed it would have made it pay for itself 1000x over by now. Of course since I'm a huge nerd and electronic LCD gadgets get me all , I just couldn't let it go, and kept thinking of times when I would have killed to have access to this type of tool, and how awesome it would be to have on hand for next time...

So, my curiosity now up, I went home and got on the internet in search of a low quality cheap Chinese knockoff version. Lo and behold, I found one at Harbor Freight for $99, detachable wireless monitor and all (which the Milwaukee lacked). Awesome! So, I was gearing up to buy this one, when I caught wind of a version floating around with a larger screen and the ability to record videos to an SD card...

Now the one I was going to get wasn't good enough anymore and I had to find the fancy one for sale. Find one I did - on Ebay with a BIN of $160, which I promptly bought. I have a bad habit of impulse buying tools though, it's starting to get expensive.

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Black88GTA
Oct 8, 2009


Baby Hitler posted:

Their little digital calipers for like $10 are actually pretty decent, also since it can change units instantly. I wouldn't do anything beyond a few hundredths with it, but they are plenty useful.

I checked one of these against a $100 (I think) Mitutoyo we have at work. The HF one was dead on. Only thing with the HF unit is that you have to take the battery out each time you use it, otherwise it'll drain it just sitting.

Black88GTA
Oct 8, 2009


I want to polish up a rough-cast aluminum intake manifold. What sort of (electric) tool would be best to take down the rough casting? No air available here, unfortunately. I was thinking about getting some sort of random orbital sander with emery pads on it, but I don't know how well that would work, or if there is something better I could use. An angle grinder with sanding disc would be too harsh for aluminum, and a dremel is too small to do the whole thing.

I want to turn this


into this



(neither one are my car, pics found on internet)

Any recs?

Black88GTA
Oct 8, 2009


PeaceFrog posted:

Have fun with that. I would grind off the rough details with a grinder, and then start at it with a small detail sander, and progress into hand sanding as it got better, likely using a dremel to get at the pain in the rear end bits. Seems like an awful lot of work for no gain. I'd rather swap in a chrome 350 than sand that to perfection.

E: First I would cut the old motor out with det cord.

Yeah, it may be a lot of work, but it gives me something to do while I'm trapped inside and can't do anything outdoors (rain ). I have a spare intake manifold already out, sitting here doing nothing. The whole car has to come apart this summer anyways, since it blew a head gasket a week ago. May as well have this ready to go when I'm ready to put everything back together.

I have a Dremel already for the detail bits, and a crappy cordless detail sander with a triangle shaped head for nooks / crannies, but I still need to get some sort of sanding / grinding thing to take down the majority of it.

Black88GTA
Oct 8, 2009


Lowclock posted:

I'm guessing that intake manifold probably got thrown in a big media shaker if it wasn't just hella man-hours with grinders and poo poo. Like a much more industrial version of a little rock tumbler. Maybe you can find a machine shop (I used one refinishing bearings) or somewhere that will do that for you. Otherwise, there's tons of good google results for "polish cast aluminum" if you feel like torturing yourself and likely ruining a manifold or two by doing it manually.

That car belongs to a guy on a SVX forum that I frequent. According to him, the heavy stuff was done with an air-powered die grinder and then it was hand finished. No air here, so I have to find an electric equivalent, or something to substitute. Unfortunately, there doesn't seem to be any electric equivalent to an air die grinder. Drills don't spin nearly as fast, and dremels are too small.

So far, I've managed to get the 3 4 "fins" on each side of center taken down flush. with a belt sander

EDIT: I can't count

Black88GTA fucked around with this message at 03:09 on Mar 14, 2010

Black88GTA
Oct 8, 2009


I just ordered $400 worth of tools / equipment from Harbor Freight in preparation for pulling the motor and doing the headgaskets on my SVX this summer. Including a 2-ton foldable engine hoist (on sale for $189.99 ), an engine stand, a mover's dolly, and a mechanic's creeper, with some other small odds and ends thrown in. Total shipping costs for the whole mess to my doorstep came to $11.99. How can you ship ~350 lbs of large, bulky poo poo for $12?

Black88GTA
Oct 8, 2009


ab0z posted:

900% profit margin on the cheap chinese crap you just ordered.

Meh. As long as it lasts me long enough to do my motor, I'm good. I'm not about to drop 3x-4x the cost on "good" stuff that's just going to sit around after this project. vv Maybe if I did this type of thing more often. It's basically the same poo poo I'd get at Autozone or anywhere else locally (but at 2x the HF cost) anyway.

RealKyleH posted:

You didnt get to use the 15-20% in store coupon. Thats where the shipping went.

Dammit. I didn't even know they offered something like this. I haven't had a local HF store to me in over 5 years.

Godholio posted:

I splurged and bought the one that's $10 more. I didn't care about the increased capacity, but it just looks more stable.

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ct...temnumber=32916

This is the one I got. That 3-legged one looks like it's ready to powerbomb your engine to the pavement if the wind catches it funny.

Black88GTA
Oct 8, 2009


I was just given an incomplete set of rather crappy looking Trade Craft brand 19.2v cordless tools, seen here:



There is a small circular saw, two reciprocating saws, and a jigsaw, which look like they have never been used. However, there is no battery or charger. Google tells me that BJ's sold these things a few years ago, but is not telling me where I can get replacement accessories. So, does anyone know where I could pick up a battery / charger for these things relatively cheaply? I need a 19.2v battery pack that will fit the following socket:



Thanks in advance, if anyone knows.

Black88GTA
Oct 8, 2009


BigKOfJustice posted:

Any recommendations for a aluminum service jack? That's serviceable? The 2 companies I buy shop jacks from doesn't have an aluminum model.

I'm looking for something around a 3 ton capacity for desert racing, it seems to be a real toss up between buying and replacing cheap chinese jacks a few times a year or shell out $800-1400 for a high end jack.

There's got to be something between Harbor Freight and Craftsman vs Pace and brunnhoelzl right?

I have the Arcan ALJ3T. I think I paid maybe $150 a couple years ago at Costco for it, although I don't know if they still stock it. I assume they do?

Good pics here (start 5 posts down): http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/...15963&showall=1

Specs here (4th one down): http://www.arcanusa.com/lifting.html

3 ton capacity and 3.75" min height, so it fits under and lifts almost anything (although I have to "coax" it a bit under my speedbump-scraping lowered Prelude). I think it's Chinese, but I haven't had a speck of trouble out of it, and it really does seem pretty sturdy / well made.

Black88GTA
Oct 8, 2009


giundy posted:

Whats the best place I can get some heavy duty torx drivers? T40 specifically for removing a 30 year old differential cover.

Craftsman are decently strong and easily sourced at Sears or K-Mart. Don't bother with the cheap ones, as they like to twist up / snap under load.

Spray the poo poo out of those bolts with PB Blaster a couple days before you attempt the job though. I didn't do that with mine, and nearly stripped out an Allen bolt in my differential this past weekend. They are all now soaking in lots of blaster, which will hopefully loosen them up by this weekend when I try it again.

Black88GTA
Oct 8, 2009


I'm looking for a low-profile transmission jack, and hoping to spend around $200 max. I'm looking for one with a starting platform height as low as possible (the ones I've seen so far seem to be about 5" - 7"), and at least 1200lb capacity. I'm probably going to end up dropping the huge slushbox in the BMW with it, so I'd like a lot of reserve capacity. I've found one that fits the bill here, but after I ordered it, they sent me an email saying that it was backordered until appx June 8. I'd rather not wait nearly a month to get it.

I've found a couple others online that have come close, but rejected them for different reasons - this one sits too high and isn't as heavy-duty as I'd like, and this one is a bit more than I wanted to spend and heavy as poo poo (145 lbs).

I have since looked (online) at Harbor Freight, Sears, Pep Boys, Autozone, Advance, Northern Tool, Amazon, Ace, Ebay, and Craigslist with nothing comparable coming up at that price point. HF had one in their catalog for $180 that would have worked (item #91020), but seem to have deleted it from their site. Right now I'm leaning towards either getting the heavy rear end HF one, or waiting out the first one I posted. Are there any other tool retailers I'm missing that might have something like this?

Black88GTA
Oct 8, 2009


RealKyleH posted:

Read this thread, harbor freight cordless tools suck. I can't think of anyone in this thread who has bought any cordless tool and thought it was worth the money. You can also tread this thread and easily see that I am a fan of harborfreight tools that are good.

EDIT: Dont forget a used $30 good drill at a garage sale is often way better than a $30 new drill.

I will be the voice of dissonance here, and say that I love my HF 19.2v cordless impact wrench. It isn't lovely at all, and hasn't let me down yet.

Of course, it was actually somewhat expensive, and def not one of the $15 throwaway things, so who knows. OP, your best bet is to go to a used tool place and pick up a used corded drill there for cheap. I did this years ago (in the mid '90s), and ended up with a 3/8 Craftsman that works great and is still kicking. I just used it last weekend, in fact.

Black88GTA
Oct 8, 2009


grover posted:

I need a thin ratchet. One that isn't 1/2"+ thick at the head. Anyone make such a beast? I can grind about 1/8" off the socket to make up for some of the thickness, but it's still not enough. I need it because of this $^$#%@##!%$^@ bolt:



My thumb is coming from the only accessible area; there is no access in any other direction to get anything resembling enough torque to break the bolt loose, so open-end wrenches just aren't working. I need to get something that will go up and over the exhaust manifold to allow me leverage, yet not foul the exhaust pipe. gently caress GM, btw. gently caress GM in the rear end until they bleed to death.

Anyone know of any super-thin 3/8" ratchets or breaker bars?

I don't suppose a 1/4" drive would work? if so, I have a little wrench that I got at Home Depot that might fit the bill. It's a reversible ratcheting offset screwdriver / wrench with a 1/4" and a 5/16" end. It came with a 1/4" drive socket attachment that slips in where the bits go (the 5/16" end). The head is about 1cm thick. I can't find it anywhere online (might be NLA? ) but it only cost around $8 IIRC. Husky model #66604. I bought it because I thought that I "might need it someday" and it turned out to be one of the tools I use most.

I could post pics if desired.

Black88GTA
Oct 8, 2009


Can someone educate me on what I'd need to reflow the solder joints on a ram socket in a laptop? I just picked up an IBM T30 laptop off Ebay for my BMW DIS-GT1 clone project (I've already tracked down all of the software for it), and found out that it has the dreaded bad memory slot problem. There are 2x 512MB chips installed, but only one is recognized. Swapping chips yields the same result, so I know they are OK. It seems the only way to permanently fix this issue is to reflow the solder connecting the memory slot to the mainboard.

I currently have at my disposal a Harbor Freight 1500W heat gun, a no-name soldering iron of unknown wattage, a 17w Weller soldering iron, and a 100w Radio Shack solder gun, none of which have temperature control of any sort. Everything I've been reading online says that you need something with adjustable temperature or a solder station, but I'd rather not drop a bunch of money on a solder station that I would hardly ever use. I found this while I was looking, and it seems like it may fit the bill. I know this is cheap China poo poo and probably won't hold up too long, but it seems like it may do the trick this one time, and it has the fine tip I'd need.

Any opinions? Ideas? Tips on how to do this so I don't break things? Stuff I need to get? Easy tricks on how to reflow nearly microscopic solder joints? Can I use a heat gun on this? Is this a completely stupid idea for someone who's never done delicate soldering before? I've soldered tons of stuff before, just never anything this small.

Black88GTA
Oct 8, 2009


nmfree posted:

Just buy a replacement needle tip for the Weller pencil iron you already own, no real point in buying yet another iron. A freestanding magnifying glass would probably help, too, but you could get by without one.

Just remember to take your time, make sure the solder joint is shiny when you're finished, and that ROHS solder melts at a higher temperature than traditional solder so you'll have to keep the iron on the joint a little longer than you're used to before it flows.

Thanks for the tips. I'm seeing if the Ebay seller will honor his 14 day warranty first, but if I do end up repairing it myself, I'll definitely get a new iron tip at the very least. I had already had my eye on one of those "helping hands" dealies with the magnifier and alligator clips on them, since it seems this job would suck without being able to see it clearly.

Would one of those "hot air rework" stations (like this ) be good for this type of project? It seems they are used primarily for placing SMDs without external posts onto PCBs. My thought was to direct the hot air jet onto the existing solder joints to melt and reflow them without even touching them. Is this stupid? Seems like that would be easier to not gently caress up...

Black88GTA
Oct 8, 2009


mod sassinator posted:

I'm not sure how good it is, but I like this cheap Harbor Freight one: http://www.harborfreight.com/6-inch...iper-47257.html It measures stuff well enough for me but I don't have really exacting needs.

I got one of these. Right after I got it, I stacked it up against a $100+ Mitutoyo we have at work, and it was spot on. The only thing that sucks about the HF one is that you have to remove the battery after each time you use it, or it'll drain it just sitting around. Not too big a deal though, there's a little well in the foam surround of the plastic case that the battery fits right into so you don't lose it.

Black88GTA
Oct 8, 2009


grover posted:

Anyone used those endoscopes HF sells? Are they any good?

Edit: these
http://www.harborfreight.com/digita...mera-67979.html
http://www.harborfreight.com/high-r...rder-67980.html

Not something I need every day or for anything specific, but it's something I've wished for several times and not had, and seemed like a nice tool for the toolbag. Would go into the bag with the thermal imager and power quality analyzer. Speaking of which, any feedback on these two, or any other nice-to-have equipment? I wouldn't mind having something I can interface with modern Caterpillar and Cummins diesel engines, too...

I have this one. Bigger screen (which is detachable - huge plus) and the ability to record on a micro SD card.

Been pretty happy with it, although I haven't had much occasion to use it yet.

Black88GTA
Oct 8, 2009


grover posted:

A bunch of cheap plastic toolboxes, sorted by task, may serve you well until you can get your big box out of hock/storage.

This way, you only have to lug around what you actually need for each job.

I used to do something similar to this. I have a whole pile of tool boxes sorted by type (wrenches in one, socket wrenches in another, a "general purpose" box, special tools, etc). Way too much poo poo to lug all of it down a bunch of stairs every time I wanted to do something. I would determine what I'd be most likely to need for whatever job I was doing, then loot the boxes for the needed items. Then I'd throw everything in a 5 gallon bucket or two (free from work), and take those down with me. I always had to run back a few times for things I ended up needing that I didn't put in the bucket though.

Black88GTA
Oct 8, 2009


I just picked up a set of these for scraping head gasket remnants off of my aluminum SVX block. Hopefully they'll do the trick.

Also grabbed this 60 piece Torx assortment since I seem to keep bumping into those stupid E-torx bolts on my BMW. I have no tools to work with these, and couldn't find anything except a basic set of wrenches locally. I had to remove one of the cams in my motor a couple weeks ago, and it was held in with e-torx. I had to go to Home Depot, and all they had that would fit was a set of "universal style" standard wrenches, which I was forced to use for that job.

That said, the set is actually really comprehensive, and appears to be of very good quality. Of course some of it is redundant for me since I had the standard torx and even some of the "security" torx bits already, but I guess it never hurts to have spares or fuckoff huge sizes that I probably won't encounter in my lifetime.

Black88GTA
Oct 8, 2009


e:^^^ I've got something like that I bought probably 10+ years ago. The set is called "The O-Ratchet" and it is awesome for certain jobs.

I have been sort of looking around for a new multimeter to replace my trusty but getting kind of beat Radio Shack fold up one. I was at HF the other day where I stumbled on this one which looked cool so I thought I'd give it a shot. I've only used it a couple times but I already love it. Need to know relative humidity? Or decibel level? Or luminance? Hertz? Temp? I probably will never need any of these things, but it's nice to know that I now have an instrument that will measure all of them for me.

When you select a function, it lights up the sockets you need to plug the test leads into, which is a bit but nice if you don't do this kind of thing every day. Oh, and it makes angry beeping sounds and flashes the correct socket light if you have the leads plugged in wrong. Nice big display with a switchable backlight, too. The probes have these removable little sleeves on the end of them which are open just at the very tip with a little space around it, so you can probe closely spaced pins without the probes slipping off or risking touching the other pins. Came with batteries even, although it says on the site that they're not included. My only gripe so far is how freakin big it is (think original Gameboy), and that there's no "peak hold" function. All in all, not too shabby for $38.

Black88GTA fucked around with this message at 05:07 on May 31, 2012

Black88GTA
Oct 8, 2009


BrokenKnucklez posted:

How accurate is it? The freebie ones they give away are actually not all that bad! I checked them compared to good ones and its with in 5% of the expensive ones. And I figure for automotive use, its good enough.

I compared it a bit with my old one (what I could, anyway), and they both agreed with each other at least. Although I don't know one way or another how accurate my old one is though, so vv

Black88GTA
Oct 8, 2009


Maybe you could get one of these?

My car actually has a little rechargeable flashlight that plugs into its own special socket in the glove box. It may be the worst flashlight I've ever used, but it's good in a pinch.

Black88GTA
Oct 8, 2009


Does anyone have recommendations for a full-featured OBDII scanner that doesn't cost a shitton? Preferably something with its own carrying case (yes it's important, shut up). Never had to deal with OBDII before, I'm used to jumper wires and pedal tricks and then counting flashes and guessing what parts to throw at it to make the bad light go away.

I wouldn't be opposed to a Tech 2 knockoff either, but I don't even know if they make those. Obviously a real deal Tech 2 would be the awesomest thing, but not for the $800+ used ones go for.

Black88GTA
Oct 8, 2009


Lowclock posted:

A cheap android something with Torque and a Bluetooth OBD2 interface seems nice for something generic. What kind of car?

Ehhhh, I'm new to this, thought all OBD2 was the same
This is for the 2003 Escalade I picked up a few weeks ago. I do have an Android I could use, would have to find an OBD2 Bluetooth interface somewhere.

Black88GTA
Oct 8, 2009


I've decided to go the Bluetooth / Torque route for now, since it seems like that may be the best sub-$100 way to do it at the moment. I figured my smartphone screen may be a bit small to cram all that information on at once (especially if I needed to glance at it while driving), so I grabbed this no-name Android tablet, which was one of very few I could find with built-in Bluetooth in the "cheap as poo poo" price range. It's suspiciously full-featured for $70, which makes me a bit nervous but I guess I'll see how it works when it arrives. I also grabbed this guy to go along with it.

Sharky, thanks for the heads up on the Auto Enginuity, it looks amazing (and exactly what I needed) since there are a few systems I wish I could look at that the regular scantools won't touch. (ABS, ride control). I may look into picking one of those up down the road, once I can justify the price tag.

Btw, email sent

Black88GTA
Oct 8, 2009


Raw_Beef posted:

Wait, youve got an affordable scan tool that resets SRS system lights?
They were the bain of my trim shop's operations. Remove a seat and turn the key on (required in some cars to get the column trim off, turning the wheel without the steering lock) and bam you got an SRS light.

Can't you just d/c the battery to get around this? No live electronics at the time of the disconnect means no fault triggers, right? Or does it know even if the battery is out?

Black88GTA
Oct 8, 2009


The Third Man posted:

...I'm making a run out to harbor freight tomorrow afternoon...thinking about picking up a general around-the-house power drill...not crap out on me after a few months of use.

Keep driving until you hit Sears or Home Depot. HF is good for some things, but power tools are not one of them.

That said, I have a couple HF power tools and they still work. Then again, I don't use them often.

Black88GTA
Oct 8, 2009


Does anyone make a fluid transfer pump that isn't a towering inferno of poo poo?

I have three of them here, none of them work. The latest casualty was a piece of poo poo that lasted all of 5 minutes before dying spectacularly in a messy, smelly explosion of Amsoil 75w90 gear lube. I ended up gravity feeding the remainder of the fluid (about 80 percent of it) into the front diff through a broken syringe and a length of tubing.

Black88GTA
Oct 8, 2009


Brigdh posted:

Motive makes one that I happen to like. Its kinda like one one of the brake pressure bleeders with a j-hook on the end.

Do you have a link or a model #? I looked around, couldn't find much. I ended up getting two of the $3.99 specials at HF because I need one right now . Got two because I know at least one of these will not work right.

Black88GTA
Oct 8, 2009


kastein posted:

The HF squishy-bulb-and-two-hoses transfer pumps work great on thin fluids like gasoline, water, ATF, and motor oil, but there's no way I'd want to use them on gear lube or 15W40.

For that, you want something like this: http://www.harborfreight.com/barrel-pump-45743.html

IIRC that is the pump I bought to do the diffs on my M54A2, not sure where it is now. Pumping 10 gallons of 75W140 GL-5 simply wasn't going to happen with anything else.

I'm not even bothering with the squishy bulb type pumps. I grabbed two of these since I had a coupon knocking them down to $3.99/each. They are the same type I had before though - one of them won't build pressure anymore, the other one the plunger all but seized in there. Both are now in the trash. The latest casualty was one of those ones that looks like a lotion pump that you screw onto the bottle.

The barrel pump looks a bit overkill for me, the diffs / transfer case / transmissions I'll be using it for range from 1.5 - 5 quarts. If I could find something like that in a size small enough to fit under a car / be used with quart size bottles, I'd be on it.


This looks pretty nice, kind of pricey though. I may pick one up if I can find a deal on it somewhere. Thanks for the link.

Black88GTA
Oct 8, 2009


ExplodingSims posted:

Maybe I just don't get the Harbor Freight mentality 'cause the nearest one has always been like a hour and a half away, but is gambling and having to drive back to store constantly really better than just coughing up the extra cash for a higher quality tool? I guess it would be good for a tool you only going to use once/rarely, but even then I'd guess you'd be able to get a better deal on used tools on ebay* or something.

*I might be slight biased on this cause like 90% of the tools I own are from ebay. I think I might have an addiction.

For me at least, it kind of happens when I'm in the middle of a project and realize "gently caress, I need [insert odd tool i don't have here] right now, but don't want to spend a shitload of money on it because I'll probably only have a need for it once in a while. The last thing I got from there that fit this category was a $12 puller / installer kit for the PS pump pulley on my truck. FWIW, I haven't had anything from HF break except for a 3-jaw puller that I was (admittedly) abusing pretty hard. I don't think I beat my tools up quite as much as some folks on here though.

And it's usually a difference where the "good" tool is (depending on what you consider to be a quality brand) 2x - 10x the cost of the HF poo poo.

Black88GTA
Oct 8, 2009


Lowclock posted:

Does your father run a shop or something? I just have the cheap harbor freight dial gauge one and it works great.

I have this one and it kind of sucks. It works OK, but you have to hold the air nozzle in place on the tire stem, or it leaks. It would be awesome if the drat nozzle didn't suck so much.

Black88GTA
Oct 8, 2009


Uthor posted:

Is the HF tool "good enough". I really don't do electrical work and don't want to drop $40 on a tool that will just sit in my tool box.

I have this one. I kind of suck at crimping wires, but I can manage good solid crimps with it, even with lovely terminals. Before that, I was using either the stamped steel type (worthless) or mashing it with pliers. Mainly because of this, I always preferred soldering + heat shrink tube on my wire harnesses. I did one this way in 1996 that I'm still using today in my beater, and it hasn't skipped a beat yet. The other thing I dislike about using crimped butt connectors on car stereo harnesses is that you end up with this big bulky pack of them in the middle of the harness that you have to wrap up and stuff out of the way, unless you think ahead and offset them so they don't all end up at the same point in the harness.

If you will be crimping everything though, the best way to do it is to strip enough insulation from the wire to allow you to fold the wire back over the insulation, then feed the insulation + folded over wire into the terminal and crimp on that (if that makes sense). That way, you don't get a wire that breaks off just behind the terminal after a couple weeks.

Black88GTA
Oct 8, 2009


Creepers are great if you've got a high vehicle or a lift, and a smooth surface to work on (garage, shop, nice driveway, etc). They suck for just about everything else. I own three for some reason, and can't remember the last time I used one, other than to wheel my toolbox around on.

I do all of my work in a crappy rutted driveway, on mostly low cars that are up on stands.

e: Cheap rear end foam mats from HF are where it's at. I use these for everything.

Black88GTA
Oct 8, 2009


Viggen posted:

Hasn't anybody heard of cardboard? You slide on it, you spill on it, whatever, just toss it and use another box?

I've used both. Thick, soft foam mats are a hell of a lot easier on your body when you're rolling around under a car for hours working on it than thin cardboard, especially on a paved surface. Also, these are pretty good about spills - they hose off really well. And I paid less than for them. Well worth it, IMO.

Black88GTA
Oct 8, 2009


Disgruntled Bovine posted:

Thanks guys, I'm still not 100% sure what I'm going to buy but I'm leaning towards that second jack I linked (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...d=ATVPDKIKX0DER) If it ever comes back in stock. As for the torque wrench I'm not sure if I'd want to trust a $20 tool with something as important as how tight my wheel bolts are. It doesn't exactly have stellar reviews and I wouldn't expect it to at that price.

I definitely won't be buying an impact as I just don't need it and I don't want to spend the kind of money that would be necessary to get a good one. As for the breaker bar, you have a point, it's just a steel stick, why bother spending a lot on it?

If impact sockets can be too large for the holes in some alloy wheels (which I fear they may be on mine as the holes are rather small) do I really need them if the torque spec for my car's wheels is only 102 ft-lbs?

Lies, the HF torque wrench is when it goes on sale (every other weekend). And it's remarkably good all things considered. Perfect for lugs, actually.

The breaker bar seems simple, but steel quality matters. I've wrenched the head off of crappy ones. The cheap deals are fine for "standard" use, but once you start putting 4' of pipe on them and jumping on the end to break bolts loose, that's what separates the manly Snap-Ons from the poo poo. Cheap ones are fine, as long as you're cool with them possibly breaking when used hard.

No need for an impact socket if you're not using an impact. The standard chrome ones are fine if you're removing / tightening with a standard wrench. Don't use anything less than a 1/2" drive wrench on these though, doing that was how I killed my favorite 3/8" ratchet

Black88GTA
Oct 8, 2009


revmoo posted:

I use this multimeter: http://www.harborfreight.com/5-in-1...eter-98674.html

I really like it. It's the nicest one I've ever used.

I've got the same one, I like it as well. The idiot lights that tell you where to put the test leads are a nice touch.
Plus, I used a coupon to get one of the free HF meters with it when I got it. :xzibit:

Black88GTA
Oct 8, 2009


BrokenKnucklez posted:

In a better help to update my body repair thread, I want to include some common used tools in body repair that most DIY auto repair people commonly have and a few tools that are a "must have".

Any one have any good tool suggestions?

Hammer and dolly set
Suction cup dent puller
Bondo spreaders
e:
Angle grinder
Wire cup brush

I have all of these things, but don't know how to use any of them properly and am basically a chimp with a rock the few times I've tried using the hammer and dolly set. I have successfully popped dents out with the suction cup at least.

Black88GTA fucked around with this message at 06:06 on Feb 14, 2013

Black88GTA
Oct 8, 2009


I've got a 5 gallon one of these:



It's the best thing ever for oil. Even if it's full, it's not unmanageably heavy so you can't get in trouble by being lazy and overfilling it to the point where you can't move it. That metal ring goes around the bottom rim of the lid and the lip on top of the drum and holds the lid in place, which is lined with a thick rubber gasket. These are designed to securely transport fairly nasty poo poo, so you just have to snap the metal thing down to lock it and it won't leak a drop (unless the ring pops off), even if it falls over. There are little holes that line up where the end of the ring snaps down so you can use a little luggage lock or a zip tie to hold it shut. Nice, big wide opening up top too, so the poor slob who has to dump it doesn't have to sit there for 10 minutes while 5 gallons of nasty old oil glugs out and splashes on him. Last time I dropped oil off at the Zone, the guy asked me where I got it and if I could hook him up.

I get them free from work - they become available from time to time, and I try to grab them when I see them.

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Black88GTA
Oct 8, 2009


Deceptor101 posted:

So one of the last things in my "portable tool setup" (not air) I need is a good torque wrench. Currently I'm using this fine specimen which has actually gotten me through quite a bit.

These do still have their uses. You can't measure breakaway torque with a clicker wrench, but you can with that one. I have that exact same one, in fact, bought for just that purpose. I needed to swap input flanges when I did my diff swap, and needed to know the breakaway torque for each so I could put the flanges back on without overtorquing and screwing up the preload.

That said, I'd grab the 1/4" and 3/8" clickers from Harbor Freight. They're cheap as hell and work well. However, for a 1/2" I'd spend a bit more and step up to something like this to get the 250 ft-lb range. The HF 1/2" drive only goes up to 150 ft-lb.

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