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Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

InitialDave posted:

The system, yes, but the master cylinder reservoir, especially if it's a plastic one, isn't going to like high pressures.

They bleed plastic reservoir master cylinder cars on the vehicle assembly line with enough snot to make the tank blow up like a balloon. Sure, your 200k mile shitbox isn't going to take that the same way it did before it was ever even started, but it's really unlikely you'll hurt anything with any pressure you're going to get out of a hand pumped plastic spray bottle.

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Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

meatpimp posted:

Why would you possibly need to pump to that kind of pressure? I've used the Motiv bleeder with less than 10psi and had substantial flow out of the bleeders.

I see you've never bled the clutch on a 944.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

meatpimp posted:

... because we were talking about bleeding brakes?

Same reservoir, same tool. It's not that uncommon to have your clutch master reservoir as part of the brake reservoir.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

porkfriedrice posted:

Can anyone recommend a good entry-level air compressor? I don't need anything huge, just something some possible air tools, filling tires, and also to use with this: http://www.harborfreight.com/air-va...tors-96677.html

As others have said, there is no way you will run that pump with an "entry level" compressor. In fact, that $14.99 POS will need an extra couple hundred dollars worth of air compressor more that what you need for the other things you described that you want to do with it. If it's a one-shot thing, you can likely buy a new pump and sell it for $30 less than you paid for it on CL almost immediately. Especially this time of year.


Drunk Pledge Driver posted:

Maybe I'll have a go at fixing the AC in my Grand National. What are the steps you would generally take? Do you vacuum the H high pressure port and fill the low pressure port with refrigerant? Also what is recommended for refrigerant? I remember someone talking about R12 Freeze or something? Whatever it was it's supposed to be better than R134a and not a pollutant like R12.

If you're starting from an "open" system, replace the dryer, close everything up with new o-rings, and hook up a manifold gauge set. Start the vacuum pump and then attach it to the service line (center hose - yellow). Open both the high and low side and let it vacuum for longer than you think you need to. As the pressure drops, it will look like it's "leaking" because the pressure will go back up - this is good, it's boiling off the moisture and the vacuum pump is dragging it back out of the system. If you run the vac for 30 minutes or so, and then shut down the high and low side valves on the gauge and it holds with 1-2 PSI for 30 minutes, you're probably good. If not, repeat the process a couple more times. If it doesn't hold after that, you're looking at other issues.

Got a vac? Good. Make sure the high and low sides are closed. Car off. Hook up a can of refrigerant. Please use R-12. Go find some, it will make you much happier. You need to take your cert online for $20 so you can buy it in small quantities. Then hook up the can properly, and open up the low side until you get ambient pressure in the system. You'll want to use some of the "first charge" stuff that has oil in it if there is no oil in your system at the moment (like if you've changed the compressor with a new one). Then you can start the car and charge as normal. Second reference today to my tutorial on that.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

porkfriedrice posted:

Would one of those have enough power for that vacuum pump? If not, I might as well just buy the powered pump. The price of the pump will still be cheaper than the price of labor at a shop, I think. (Bad A/C compressor.)

Barely. You may not be able to pull as much of a vacuum for as long as you'd want to. I've never had much luck with the air operated vacuum pumps on anything less than a shop compressor (think 60 gallon 240v Ingersol Rand 5 HP kind of thing, which pusts you really near $1k).

The electric vacuum pumps are just a much better idea. If you aren't going to be using it more than occasionally, here's a really good one for the price. It's worked for me for a year now, and I've vaced systems 4 or 5 times with it. It pulls to 29 inches in under 10 minutes. The HF one I had barely got to 22", but that was several years ago. I'm sure they are sourced from a different sweat shop by now, so who knows.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

Lowclock posted:

Well technically you never HAVE to have an impact on a car at least.

That's not really true. Off the top of my head, I can think of at least one job I've done in the last year where there was no alternative (struts on a 944 - there is no way to hold the strut shaft on most types, so you have to impact it off of the strut tower). I know there's other stuff, but I'm pre-coffee.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

oxbrain posted:

edit: A bad idea that will probably burn down your apartment and kill many children: Find two outlets running on opposite poles of your breaker box and make a custom cord to combine for 220v.

Fire Marshal Motronc is crying.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

Geoj posted:

^
Is a gas powered compressor likewise out of the question? Most tool rental places should have them (assuming you don't want to buy one permanently), as they're fairly popular with roofing and flooring crews working on houses that haven't had their electrical hooked up yet.

Where? I've never seen any contractor not using some small pancake compressor hooked up to a 5k generator that they can also charge their batteries and run their radio off of around here.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

IOwnCalculus posted:

I have one but haven't had a lot of time with it yet. Turns out many of them do have issues communicating with older Ford OBDII vehicles, like my '98 Ranger. Haven't tried it on my MS3 but I did lend it to a friend who used it with his RX8 and it worked out well for him.

So as long as you don't have an older Ford, go for it.

That's more of a software problem than anything. I just had to update my software to scan a Hyundai Santa Fe that just wouldn't connect. The software update added a "slow start" version of one of the protocols it uses and it now connects about 75% of the time.

Standards are awesome. There are so many to choose form.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

mindphlux posted:

I don't know much about engine interfaces - do they all mostly just do this ODB-ii thing?

30 bucks sounds like the price range I was hoping for, I'd probably pay to be able to reset my loving engine light. can you just leave the thing plugged in at all times? would be sort of neat to just like 'doot da doo' pull up android app while driving and be like 'yeah check out my fuel air mix baby'

Yes and yes. They're even powered off of the OBD-II port.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

Lord Gaga posted:

machine shop brands that don't have the marketing

....or lifetime no questions asked warranty

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

Hughmoris posted:

I'm trying to build up a small tool collection to learn to work on my truck and motorcycle. If I can't afford snap-on or mac, is crafsman my next best choice?

Your next best choice is Snap-On or Mac from a used tool place like Re-Tool.

Then Craftsman.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

CornHolio posted:

Do only the more expensive clamps measure DC?

Yes. The cheap ones are just transformers (can only measure AC). The good ones are Hall Effect sensors, like a cam position sensor.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

Powershift posted:

Going through a whole pile of wrenches and sockets that have been sitting in a sea can for ~10 years, the craftsman ones are consistently rusted to poo poo while the westward, jet, and no-name chinese poo poo are mostly ok. From here on out, i think i'm avoiding craftsman like the plague.

...


Unfortunately, most of the bigger wrenches are craftsman, so I'm soaking them in evaporust rather than just tossing them.

Why? Just bring them back to Sears and get new ones.

I used to go through garage sales and flea markets for Craftsman tools (years ago....it seems enough people have caught on to this by now) and by rusty rear end garbage for pennies, and get brand new tools back from the store.

There are things I don't want to buy Craftsman - things like cheeseheads and other drivers or sockets that tend to break or bend and cause me all manner of pain when the fastener gets munged up. But for basic hand tools, they work just fine and are easily replaced for free.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

Viggen posted:

Stores are also wise to this, and all of my local stores for the last decade want proof of purchase.

They also try to give you rebuilt ratchets instead of new ones.

Ask for the manager. It's in the warranty that they have to give you new stuff. They just try to get off cheap when they can. I was told this by a local manager when I asked for one when they tried to give me some rebuilt POS out of a bin for a basically brand new ratchet that poo poo the bed on me.


Powershift posted:

I tried, they said "they're not broken, they're just ugly". They did replace 2 ratches with completely jammed mechanisms, but said they wouldn't do anything about the wrenches.

I've had that happen also. You need to go back when someone else is there, or to a different store. Most employees could care less. I had one guy who dumped an entire box of my crap into the broken bin without looking at it and said "you knew what was in there, right? Good...go shopping."

Don't be a dick to the clerks, look like you might be a real customer who wants other things, don't go when it's slammed and everyone is busy and you'll be treated well.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

PBCrunch posted:

Do any of you have any experience with ratcheting open ended wrenches? I replaced a steering rack the other day and if the ROEWs work they could have made the job easier.

I've used them a few times, but I really don't feel like they bite well, and always worry about munging up wrench flats.

I try to use my gear wrenches in situations like that if at all possible.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

PBCrunch posted:

POWAR.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

ASSTASTIC posted:

The only real disadvantage of por15 imo is that you have to REALLY seal it well and to preserve it you want to put it in the refrigerator.

I used to transfer mine into a glass container so I could get the drat lid off again, but somebody (on here, maybe) mentioned just putting a piece of plastic between the lid and can - genius. I also put mine in a vacuum bag and run it through the sealer and it seems to last just fine.

I hadn't thought about the fridge. I suppose I can spare some beer space in the shop fridge for a couple cans of POR. Its easier than bringing it inside to use the sealer on it.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

BrokenKnucklez posted:

Though I have had excellent luck with the angle grinders, and they are actually lasting longer than expected.

If by excellent you mean "I only stalled it once every 3 or 4 minutes and it didn't explode at all", I agree. But for $15 on sale I really have no room at all to complain. They really could use more power......or maybe I was spoiled by the Milwaukee I was borrowing from a friend before I bought a HF one.


Goldmund posted:

No electric tools. .....air compressor

Best of luck. I've been through 3 of the smallest 240v ones. They like to poo poo rings and/or the reed valve thing at the top. I only have kept going because the first 2 replacement were free. I've yet to get the last one going again, it's it out of warranty.

But the parts I thought I needed were cheap enough....I just don't really know how compressors work well enough to know what is wrong at this point. It ejected its oil, seized the rod/wrist pin, and I replaced them as well as the gaskets up top. It makes some air, but doesn't produce any real pressure. I'm assuming I screwed up the reassembly because of this, but I don't really know. So to hijack, if anyone knows anything about this I'd really appreciate for some pointers.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

oxbrain posted:

What's the brand/model?

I'd say either your rings are shot or your valves aren't sealing or closing properly. The valves are a super simple assembly, just metal flaps covering a hole to only let air through one way. Make sure they're laying flat against their seats at rest and that they aren't rusted shut. Checking the rings is easy enough, just look for obvious cracking or gouging and make sure they aren't loose in the bores.

Basic reed valve head. Intake on the right, exhaust on left.


It doesn't look like they even sell it anymore. It is the 240v model of this.

I figured the rings would be easy enough to figure out. And I don't know if I've actually checked that or not....I just haven't bothered to touch it in a few months since it disgusted me.

The valve(s) on mine are still shiny and new, but I only have one. Maybe it works for both exhaust and intake. I suppose it would have to. I was concerned that I got it on upside down, but think I trie it both ways to no avail.

This motivated me to take it apart again. I try to do that later tonight and take some pictures. Thanks for the pointers!

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

Lowclock posted:

I'm not big on painting, at least in any proper way, and I figured this seemed like a better place than the stupid questions thread. If I'm painting over paint and not bare metal, should I bother with a coat of primer first, or just scuff it and spray?

How bad is the paint underneath, and will you need to fill in any scratches? Also, are you spray bombing or painting with a gun (you can lay it on MUCH thicker with a gun, so you don't necessarily have to worry quite as much about imperfections).

Bottom line, if it's old paint and you dont need to fill anything in and it's close to the right color or the color you are spraying is dark enough to not matter.....just scuff and spray. Otherwise, a rattle can of high build primer left to properly dry, then scuffing that will level out some things for you if necessary.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

kastein posted:

what I'm always afraid of is doing something that will result in bubbling/cracking/crazing. I've seen some pretty horrible results when a car that was spraybombed previously gets painted with proper 2-stage paint and the chemicals react poorly with each other.

This is because the paint underneath wasn't dry yet. And that's being nice about it, because I'm assuming proper surface prep was done first.

Yes, certain types of paints are incompatible. But only their wetting agents. If you let it completely dry (could take months depending on that paint) you will have no compatibility issues.

Lowclock posted:

Oh I'm not painting panels or anything important, just some old wheels that I got for cheap. I'm not so much concerned with getting a perfect surface finish as much as just keeping the poo poo from flaking off in a week. Think I would be ok with "normal" paint, or should I actually bother with "wheel paint"? Painting them black so I don't have to clean brake dust.

I painted over a set of Fuchs that I got with a 944 and put them on daily winter driving duty for the last 3 years (probably 20k miles). They are still just fine. I was painting over the original (powdercoat, I believe). All I did was scuff, clean them very well, make sure they were dry and warm enough (getting tougher this time of year), and spray bombed them with black Rustoleum. I think I did 3 light coats. They still look just fine, even after repeated scrubbings with a brush during cleaning.



Yeah, the lug nuts and center caps can use some help. But the wheels themselves, other than being filthy, look just fine with no flaking/gouges/scratches/whatever. They are still shiny when clean.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

PeaceFrog posted:

sharp bits

If he's spinning them, it's too late for any of the rest of your advice. Get them sharpened, start following PeaceFrog's advice, and you'll be fine. You are trying to find a solution to a symptom, not the real problem.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

Veins McGee posted:

There's 108 pages in this thread so I hope this hasn't been asked before. I'm looking for a welder to do some rust repair in my XJ/CUCV. Is the Lincoln AC-225 a good choice for a novice?

http://www.amazon.com/Lincoln-Elect...r/dp/B0000CBIKA

A stick welder would seem to be a poor choice unless you are doing frame welding. A 110v FCAW/flux core does sheet metal body panels and exhaust just fine. I've got a Lincoln Weldpac 100 (62 AMP) that does just well by me. MIG would be better/cleaner, but it's nice to have the option to use flux core if you're outside on a windy day or in odd positions. Some day I'm going to pick up the conversion kit for mine so I can do both.

I'd only stick welded before this. It's quite a change, but in my opinion, a much better way of doing the things I typically do. Still trying to get used to holding OFF of my work piece, but after just a few times I was welding better/cleaner than I ever had with a stick welder. Note, I'm not much of a welder to begin with, but I can make my way through some body repairs and certainly exhaust/brackets/hangers. I have more clean up to do than a competent welder would, but I eventually get there. If you have more experience welding...especially stick welding....my opinions here might not be valid for you.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

Rhyno posted:

Has anybody bought this yet? I've wanted one since Anthony Sullivan hyped it in infomercials.

http://www.harborfreight.com/5-doub...68316-8065.html

Doesn't that just make a huge kerf for no good reason, other than to people who have very poor saw skills. Looks like all of those kitchen devices (slicers, dicers, etc) designed to replace proper knife skills.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

KozmoNaut posted:

First off, it's been stored correctly at the lowest torque setting.

That is not relevant, no matter how many people think it is so.

A click type torque wrench pushes a ball into a detent under spring pressure. The higher the pressure, the harder it is to slip the ball out of the detent.

So unless someone wants to argue that springs wear from be compressed rather than use (which is a popular misconception on its own, leading to the "always unload your magazines" type "wisdom"), there is no reason to unload a torque wrench when storing it. In fact, it can be argued that it wears the spring more and causes it to lose calibration faster when you always unload it.

I don't care what your grandpaw said. This is early college level materials science. Take one apart and you'll see and understand.

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Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

pim01 posted:

So what's best practice, or doesn't it matter what you do? All three of my different makes of torque wrenches say to leave them loaded just a bit above the minimum for storage so that's what I've been doing..

I do nothing. They stay where I last left them.

If you do choose to dial them down, DEFINITELY leave them above minimum. In fact, never even go to minimum....it won't be accurate there and the ball might fall out of the detent if you're out of calibration far enough.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

mod sassinator posted:

IIRC my cheap Harbor Freight wrench said to store it at ~20 ft lbs (a little bit above minimum). Maybe they're just being cautious but I figure it can't hurt.

Just like most firearms manufacturers say to store mags unloaded. Simply because you design/spec/assemble things and write a manual doesn't mean you know anything about how springs wear.

It is quite a persistent misconception. But if it were true, suspension springs would sag from sitting. All of those barn finds would be laying on their bump stops but they aren't because it doesn't work that way. Your springs sag because you drive on lovely roads and take corners and generally do things to make them move. A spring in a torque wrench is no different than that, and wears for the same reasons.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

grover posted:

You may want to review your textbooks for "creep" which is a very real process that causes slow plastic deformation of metals, even at stresses well within the elastic deformation range. It's more pronounced at higher temparatures, but still occurs at room temp. You DO want to store those torque wrenches unloaded!

I agree that creep is a real thing. I do not agree that it makes any practical difference on the types of springs stored at the temperatures we are discussing here. It's much too late for me to go running numbers to demonstrate this, but I have in the past and have drawn my conclusion from that.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

kmcormick9 posted:

What's the best HF spray gun for auto paint? I'm gonna tarp off my carport and paint my mr2 with rustoleum using the instructions on instructables.com

There's a choice other than the detail gun and the full sized HVLP?

I've painted a few with the full sized HVLP. It's not the best thing if you've ever used a $200+ gun, but it gets the job done just fine.

If there really is more than once choice, I'll figure out which one I bought for you for a recommendation. But I'm pretty sure there's only one full size available.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

GnarlyCharlie4u posted:

so... I should buy this right?

No....you don't want that <jumps into car and starts driving>.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

Sockington posted:

I needed a small toolbox to lockup my tools at work. Not finding anything that really fit my needs, I decided to slap some stainless on an old electrical panel from work.

Awesome. You have the very first Square D toolbox.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

Splizwarf posted:

What is the difference between those and 12-point Torx?

e: derp, Google says I'm retarded, 12-point Torx is triple square.

A.K.A. "cheese head". Why there are 3 different names for the same head design I do not know.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

GnarlyCharlie4u posted:

I need a good multimeter but don't have the $100-300 to spend on a Fluke.

Can anyone suggest a decent cheap-ish multimeter?

That depends.....in what way do you need it to be "good"? Digital or analog?

For typical automotive repairs, you don't need much more than a POS that can tell you if you're within a few tenths of 12 V and something that can show you resistance.

Getting more into things, a large amperage capacity is useful, as is something with a tone function for short detection. Also something ruggedized. But really, what features you want/need make all the difference.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

GnarlyCharlie4u posted:

I want it to work. My harbor freight ones all read out incorrect results.

I think I have 3 of them. All of them readout wrong results and not one of them gives the same results as another.

Analog ones? You do realize they need to be adjusted/zeroed, right?

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

8th-samurai posted:

I picked up a Fluke 113on ebay for like $70, last meter I will ever need. I got tired of buying cheap radio shack ones broke every few years.

That's pretty good price. I've got a 77, which has a few more features, and it's my absolute go-to. I do have others that I use for specific purposes, but the 77 pretty much cover 95% of what I do. And that includes board level repair (where I'm either using the 77 or a scope).

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

PBCrunch posted:

Both times I have broken my S-O 1/4 ratchet I have had a deep socket over the handle of the ratchet and a long extension on the deep socket to make the handle effectively longer.

Great. I hadn't thought of that one before. Now that bad idea is going to pop into my head to try to get myself out of a jam and I'm gonna use it. And I'm gonna break my ratchet.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

wav3form posted:

I'm now replacing all my wrenches for the ratcheting kind.

They are awesome, but they are definitely NOT a replacement. I _need_ both.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

Angle grinders depend a lot on momentum. If he doesn't need much power and just wants to reduce the speed, that will probably work. But if he needs power, it's likely to be a miserable experience.

Also, that one looks a bit small. My angle grinder is 7 or 8 amps, and I think that's pretty typical. Just make sure you get one big enough for whatever you're running through it. 10 Amp variacs aren't terribly expensive and ought to do the trick.

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Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

camino posted:

AC motors for the most part depend on frequency for speed changes. It doesn't appear to me that that transformer changes frequency, just voltage.

In that case the motor would run at the same speed, just with less power. Unless I'm incorrect.

You're correct. A VSD (variable speed drive that changes frequency and not power) would allow for closer to full power when turned down, but a variac will reduce the power enough to slow the rotation on something that relies on a flywheel effect like an angle grinder.

Although if you let the angle grinder sit unloaded it will eventually get up to it's normal rotational speed regardless of where you set the variac.

I've used one (variac) on a bench grinder for polishing work much like what FogHelmut was asking about. It's not an optimal solution, but VSDs are entirely too expensive to even consider for something like this.

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