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SNiPER_Magnum
Jan 21, 2001

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Nap Ghost

What is the difference between 12pt and 6pt sockets? I'm guessing 6pt would be less likely to round a nut and 12pt is easier to slip on a nut. There doesn't seem to be much of a difference in price.

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SNiPER_Magnum
Jan 21, 2001

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Nap Ghost

Michael Bolton posted:

Also, a 12-point socket can be used to drive bits that are 4-sided. I used a 12-point socket with an easy-out bit that was 4-sided.

This makes sense, I guess. A lot of drain plugs are four sided. I just use an open-end wrench on those.

I understood 12pt box-end wrenches because there are only so many angles you can use them at, but a ratchet and socket doesn't have the same restraint.

SNiPER_Magnum
Jan 21, 2001

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Nap Ghost

How do you calibrate a torque wrench, or check to make sure it is calibrated?

SNiPER_Magnum
Jan 21, 2001

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Nap Ghost

I only buy Craftsman stuff if it's on sale for a decent price. Stuff like screwdrivers and wrenches aren't going to break enough to justify spending more for the warranty to me.

I'm always afraid of those fancy wrenches breaking on me. It is a pretty unjustified fear because I haven't heard of them breaking, but I admire a solid piece of drop-forged steel for it's strength.

SNiPER_Magnum
Jan 21, 2001

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Nap Ghost

That stupid little plastic lever is a real bitch. I've seen them snap off very easily. And I don't think I've heard of any Sears exchanging ratchets now. You won't get a new one, only a rebuilt one. I don't really mind rebuilt ratchets so much, but waiting that long for one is ridiculous.

SNiPER_Magnum
Jan 21, 2001

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Nap Ghost

I use Kobalt screwdrivers. They seem equal to Craftsmen in terms of quality, are cheaper, and supposedly have the no-questions-asked warranty (which I've never had to use).

Actually, whenever I need hand tools, Lowes is my first stop now.

SNiPER_Magnum
Jan 21, 2001

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Nap Ghost

kimbo305 posted:

There's this stuff someone mentioned called wire dry spray, and I think I found the brand Gunk associated with it? I'm looking for something I can spray into/onto electric connections to drive moisture off of them. Is wire dry what I want? And what's the right name for it?

WD40. This is what WD40 (water displacement) is actually supposed to do.

SNiPER_Magnum
Jan 21, 2001

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Nap Ghost

grover posted:

Do NOT do this! WD40 will coat everything, and you can't get rid of it. Also, it's an insulator. Special-made electronics cleaner does an even better job, and evaporates completely after you've used it. I have a can of electronics cleaner I bought at AutoZone years ago, and I use it constantly for cleaning electronic connectors.

Coating everything: use the straw
Insulator: helps prevent shorts even better
Leaves a film: prevents moisture buildup

I agree that there is nothing better for cleaning electronics than an electronics cleaner. I am a firm believer in using the proper tool. If you want to clean, use a cleaner (not WD40). If you want to lubricate, use a lubricant (not WD40). If you want to penetrate, use a penetrating solution (not WD40). If you want to get rid of moisture, use WD40. That is what it is supposed to do. And any other water displacer is going to be the same thing (mineral spirits, petroleum distillates) and probably more expensive and harder to find.

I hate how WD40 is regarded as some magical cure all because it does a thousand things very terribly, but getting rid of moisture is the one thing that it is truly good at and what it should be used for.

sharkytm posted:

WD40 is designed as a wire dryer, not as a contact cleaner.

It was actually designed to keep Cold War rockets from rusting. Don't want to deliver any inferior goods to the commies

SNiPER_Magnum
Jan 21, 2001

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Nap Ghost

Korwen posted:

I'm thinking about slowly aquiring all of this stuff as I find good deals

This is the best thing to do. With sets of sockets, wrenches, and screwdrivers, you can do most simple things. A hammer, breaker bar, and torque wrench will really get you set to work on a lot of stuff.

Make sure you don't skimp on jackstands, quality is a must on those.

I only buy my stuff on a need/great deal basis.

SNiPER_Magnum
Jan 21, 2001

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Nap Ghost

Craftsman wrench + torch = any shape wrench you want and it changes back in the store

I saw that on American Hotrod once.

SNiPER_Magnum
Jan 21, 2001

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Nap Ghost

Does the aluminum jack accept the transmission adapter? Lugging the regular jack around is getting old and my back wants to replace it. I think the 2-1/4 ton rating is actually the weight.

SNiPER_Magnum
Jan 21, 2001

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Nap Ghost

I think Carquest is Wix, like NAPA Gold.

SNiPER_Magnum
Jan 21, 2001

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Nap Ghost

Splizwarf posted:

I dunno what the return policy on Kobolt, Husky, Stanley, and DeWalt is but they're comparable for quality AFAIK.

I've been sold on Kobalt for a while now as a replacement for Craftsman. I haven't tried out the warranty yet (nothing broken) but all the packaging says Hassle Free Replacement and apparently Lowes will replace anything anyway. I have heard of people getting broken Stanley stuff replaced there.

SNiPER_Magnum
Jan 21, 2001

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Nap Ghost

Just use 2!

17-1/2" max height is kinda puny for offroad use too.

SNiPER_Magnum
Jan 21, 2001

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Nap Ghost

You have to pump the poo poo out of that thing to get any amount of fluid. And if you don't have a good fit on your bleeder screw, you get a lot of little air bubbles. I don't think it's worth it unless you don't have friends and can't get speed bleeders.

SNiPER_Magnum
Jan 21, 2001

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Nap Ghost

Not on everything and definitely not on torque wrenches.

SNiPER_Magnum
Jan 21, 2001

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Nap Ghost

Why do you need a specific number of cavities? Can you not leave some empty? Deutsch makes lots of big connectors, 102 cavity and beyond. Deutsch is probably the best quality you can get. Deutsch is also expensive, though.

Delphi Metripacks and GTs might be the good choice here. Tools, terminals, and seals are all pretty affordable I think. Use Metripack for all 5-way and below, and above 15 amp. GT can handle all else of your needs.

What you are going to need:
-Proper gauge wire
-Male and female sealed connectors
-Male and female terminals to match wire gauge
-Terminal seals to match wire gauge
-Crimpers that do the right gauge terminal AND seal crimps

I wouldn't use unsealed for much of anything. And I wouldn't use a crimp tool not designed for your particular seals and terminals.

Other connector types to look at: Tyco, Molex, AMP

SNiPER_Magnum
Jan 21, 2001

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Nap Ghost

I use the orange iron ones, they haven't killed me yet so I don't have a problem with them. I can carry four at a time, and living in an apartment they haven't given me a problem yet.

Whichever ones you get, get the red pads too and keep your frame rails happy.

SNiPER_Magnum
Jan 21, 2001

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Nap Ghost

Solder splicing and butt splicing will be essentially the same if done correctly. Just be sure the joint is soldered or crimped properly, then heat shrink over it (unless you use insulated butt slices). I hate using electrical tape. Heat shrink insulated butt splices are awesome.

SNiPER_Magnum
Jan 21, 2001

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Nap Ghost

If your soldering skills are crap, then the joint will crack. A lot of people submit to "the bigger the glob, the better the job" method and just slap it on without good wet solder tension.
Heating the wires will help, but flux is really your friend. Use flux and be amazed.

SNiPER_Magnum
Jan 21, 2001

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Nap Ghost

What do you guys use to heat your garages? I am trying to look for some kind of 120V heater that will be good for a 2 car garage, but I'm not having much luck finding anything. Lowes has a lot of space heaters that have a description as vague as "This will heat a room* *fine print results may vary"

SNiPER_Magnum
Jan 21, 2001

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Nap Ghost

Welp that really sucks. I was hoping to get something decent to heat with 120V but I guess there isn't anything. It is unattached with no gas or 240V. Maybe kerosene it is.

SNiPER_Magnum
Jan 21, 2001

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Nap Ghost

Lowclock posted:

How is the feel on the release of the aluminum racing jack from HF that everyone recommends?

It has the release typical of all reasonably priced jacks: standstill to freefall with a slight twist. The handle is very thick though, so modulating it is a lot easier than other jacks I've used.

SNiPER_Magnum
Jan 21, 2001

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Nap Ghost

Aluminum corrodes nearly instantly when exposed to air, and has a pseudo-protective barrier. Water immersion should not have an effect. I would not be concerned about the metal, but would be of the fluid and seals mentioned above. It's probably all OK, but jack oil is cheap enough.

SNiPER_Magnum
Jan 21, 2001

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Nap Ghost

Lowes cuts wood for cheap, or free if the employees care very little.

SNiPER_Magnum
Jan 21, 2001

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Nap Ghost

I thought something like that would be cool for changing wheels and brakes at the track, but for $1600 hell no. And the paddock can be grass and gravel too, and I'll bet it's useless in that.

SNiPER_Magnum
Jan 21, 2001

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Nap Ghost

foundtomorrow posted:

I have one of the HF 3000lb. aluminum racing jacks and its useful but not really good for lifting any of my vehicles because the max height is so low.

I'll second that. I liked the big ol orange jack, but it is way to heavy to lug up and down apartment steps or put in your trunk. My aluminum one has trouble getting my GTO's wheels off the ground. The aluminum jacks are probably only worth it if you need to move around a lot, like when you go racing. Otherwise, go for height.

SNiPER_Magnum
Jan 21, 2001

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Nap Ghost

scapulataf posted:

Fake edit: Is porter cable a reputable brand? Like is it on par with the Milwaukees and DeWalts that everyone has big boners for??

When I worked construction, a lot of the stuff we used was Porter-Cable. It stood up to our abuse. Granted, I didn't work there for very long, but I felt like them actually paying money for it was a sign of quality (they did not use cheap tools).

SNiPER_Magnum
Jan 21, 2001

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Nap Ghost

I still like Craftsman, the quality has gone down but they aren't cheap yet, and the sets you can buy are very convenient. Instead of a ratchet here, socket set there, extension somewhere else, digging around in your tool box or bag to get everything you want.

I mostly use (and abuse) a Stanley set I got off woot years ago. Only thing I have broken was the 3/8 ratchet last weekend with several feet of cheater and all my weight on it. It has 1/4 and 3/8 ratchets with every standard and metric size up to 19mm, extensions, deep sockets, and spark plug sockets all in one case. It's great opening one case and having everything you need at your fingertips.

SNiPER_Magnum
Jan 21, 2001

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Nap Ghost

mod sassinator posted:

Yeah the wheel lock style is a cylinder shaft with half cylinders bumping out a few sides in random places. (external spline seems to be the term) I think I could hammer on a socket and see what happens.

Careful, it's easy to scratch the paint

SNiPER_Magnum
Jan 21, 2001

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Nap Ghost

PBCrunch posted:

Couldn't a person just rig up a cheap battery tender on one of those household timers and just restrict it to running a half hour per day.

I'm not sure what you mean here. A Battery Tender (name brand) or other float or trickle charger are supposed to be used on a fully charged battery. Batteries naturally discharge just sitting around, and a low-current float charge cancels out the natural discharge. A true high-current battery charger, on the other hand, can only be used on a battery that has been discharged. Using a true charger on a full battery will cause it to overheat and boil. Using a timer on a trickle charger kinda defeats the purpose.

SNiPER_Magnum
Jan 21, 2001

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Nap Ghost

1hp = ~750watts, so figure 4amps per hp at 230/240V, or double at 120V, and that will give you a decent estimate with some wiggle room built in

SNiPER_Magnum
Jan 21, 2001

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Nap Ghost

I talked to people that have bought the transmission adapters, and no one has had any luck with one. I bought the HF scissor type to remove one transmission, it did OK.

SNiPER_Magnum
Jan 21, 2001

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Nap Ghost

mod sassinator posted:

Walmart has a 150 piece Stanley socket set for $44--looks like a good basic set for really cheap: http://www.walmart.com/ip/Stanley-1...et-Set/21812626

I have a Stanley set that I've used for years almost without fail. Looks similar to this set except I don't have the bits, keys, and spanners (mine's the ratchets and sockets only). I've had to replace the 3/8 ratchet after the drive twisted off by me jumping up and down on several feet of cheater pipe attached to it, which was also after I twisted a drive adapter on my breaker bar + cheater doing the same thing. So these will take abuse and would be a great starter set or for your junkyard bag.

SNiPER_Magnum
Jan 21, 2001

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Nap Ghost

God drat it! All the stores around me are starting to have poo poo selection for tools. Lowes doesn't carry flare nut wrenches any more. The Craftsman set at Sears looks cheap but isn't priced that way. Are HF's flare nut wrenches good for things that mustn't be rounded?

SNiPER_Magnum
Jan 21, 2001

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Nap Ghost

If that reader is like the one I have, it just shorts the self-test pin to the ground on the test connector. I found mine useless, but mine just beeps instead of having a display.
Can't you short the pins yourself and count check engine light blinks? Or do Aussie Fords not use EEC-IV electronics? The EEC-VI test connector should be either red or black, shaped like a trapezoid, and have a top row of 2 pins and bottom row of 4, plus a separate one-pin gray self-test connector. They are usually near the power relay box and have a cover labelled "EEC Test".

I snagged the Craftsman flare nut wrench set, $30 on sale. Looked like it was flexing a bit when I used one, but nothing rounded so I'm happy so far.

SNiPER_Magnum
Jan 21, 2001

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Nap Ghost

I don't think that will help you then because that reader is for MCU and EEC-IV. Summit Racing has the instructions for download
Product page
Instructions

SNiPER_Magnum
Jan 21, 2001

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Nap Ghost

Anyone have the Harbor Freight 12-ton press and like it (or not)? A-frame or H-? I'm Christmas shopping, will it be a bad gift?

SNiPER_Magnum
Jan 21, 2001

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Nap Ghost

If you really want to cheap out on sockets, get an individual deep wall that's the size of your lug nuts. Then just keep it in your glovebox or sparetire well so you always know where it is. If you're not going to use the whole set, there isn't a need to buy one. And it's pretty nice to have a dedciated socket.

Impact sockets are thicker, so definiely be mindful when using them to not scratch your wheels.

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SNiPER_Magnum
Jan 21, 2001

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Nap Ghost

I buy paint buckets from whatever home improvement store has them on sale, then take them to the local household waste dump. I get tired of the parts stores always having their bin full, ALWAYS. Those dumps are awesome if you have one nearby.

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