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Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


Ok, some of you may have heard that i've been going at this stuck bolt in a ZX2 for two weeks now. After using a Quik Center kit on the remains of the stud, the whole thing is well and truly hosed. (Quik Centers apparently don't work so well with no threads left on the stud, upside down, inside a 1.25" hole.) This bolt has GOT to get the gently caress out. Basically, I have two options left. One is to remove the entire subframe and work on the bolt from above, the other is to use a ball bit in a die grinder and go at the remains from underneath. This is a sway bar bracket bolt, btw.

The plan is to grind the stud away until there's just the nut welded to the frame left. Then, drill a hole dead center in that nut, run another 8.8 bolt from the top and put a washer and another nut on the bottom. The stock fastener is pretty well hosed after today.

Anyway, I KNOW my air compressor is not up to the task of running my grinder. I'll get about 10 seconds out of it, then wait 5 minutes for a recharge. It's going to take all day to remove .75" of hollow bolt stud. The compressor is fully home-made by my grandpa back in the 50's. He was working at Brown/Fintube at the time, and welded the tank up from stuff at work. I'd say it is 2.5' in diameter, and maybe 3' tall off the floor including the stand. He used some big honking 110/220 motor, and a compressor off a scrap refrigerator from that era. So recharge time is just poo poo! The tank is fine and, I think, plenty big enough for one person to use at a time. Are there any companies out there that will sell just a compressor and motor combo? Something that will just pump the HELL out of some air? I've seen some W-3 compressors at the store, and I want a ridiculously fast recharging pump in my garage.

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Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


scapulataf posted:

Do you have a dremel with a good quality carbide ball grinder?

I have a Dremel...

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


InitialDave posted:

I don't know if you meant to give that impression, but an 8.8 is not equivalent to a grade 8, it's more like a grade 5. Grade 8 is equivalent to 10.9.

EYE. OPENING.

Thanks for the info.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


That 36mm will take off the axle nut on a N-body.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


Just "rent" one from AZ if you don't have it and you don't own the car in question.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


I will now be purchasing those punches for work on firearms. If you're working on someone else's gun, or you just want to keep yours immaculate, there's a whole other strata of tool quality out there.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


I picked up some 3/8" snap-on wobble bars today. Right after my card got swiped, the guy gave me a flier. I flipped it open to the first page, and the wobble bars were on sale. The salesman cursed and gave me a new receipt with a credit on it. What snap-on tool should I apply the deposit towards? I was thinking screw drivers, but they're five times as expensive as Craftsman.

I've got SAE and Metric 6 point combination wrench sets (craftsman), a 6 point metric and 12 point SAE 3/8" socket set (snap-on). Maybe a 6 point SAE set and a fine toothed 3/8" ratchet? Little midget combination wrenches?

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


RealKyleH posted:

How much are they, cause man screwdrivers are just one of those thing that having the right size and a head that's not rounded out is the difference between 15 seconds of unscrewing and 30 minutes of being screwed.

4 piece hard grip set - 37.95
8 piece hard grip set - 134.95

I think the whole toolkit I assembled as a present this past christmas was under $120.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


PBCrunch posted:

FWIW I have a few Snap-On screwdrivers and they are much nicer than the Craftsman ones I have. The tips are more precisely machined and have some kind of notches or something that help them grip screws. They might be magnetic too I don't know.

I know that I always reach for the tool truck (Snap-On, Mac, Matco, Cornwall) tools in my box first. I only have a few but they are awesome. My Snap-On cordless electric impact gun is by far the most expensive tool I have but it is unbelievably awesome. It cost twice as much as my 30 gallon air compressor. Since I moved into my house eight months ago I haven't even plugged in the compressor.

I loving KNOW about 'there is a difference', and there is. The first aircraft I got assigned to had an all Snap-On / Blue-Point toolbox. I didn't think anything of it until the next station, where the spec toolbox was mostly Craftsman. We loving ANNIHILATED the 3/8" ratchet monthly, just from general use, not to mention rapefucking a screwdriver weekly. However, $100 is a LOT of money to spend on something you'll wear out every 5 years if you go cheap.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


Mid-wells are like the midget wrench and the stubby screw driver. Rarely used, but sometimes essential.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


Snap-on makes a 3/8" drive ratchet that is sized like a 1/4" ratchet. I can't imagine it is at all durable.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


astrollinthepork posted:

What's a good torch for heating up seized bolts?

The bernz-o-matic clicky wand. TS4000? I don't know. It's black with brass fittings, a red knob and a stainless gas pipe. Screw a propane or MAPP canister directly into the bottom, turn the knob to ON, then depress it twice. You might need MAPP for your exhaust bolts, i've used propane for suspension bolts, stuck flare nuts in a brake cylinder and a harmonic balancer.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


Chauncey posted:

Hi guys, I just bought this tool for my birthday:

It's a Husqvarna 435 it's very light, has a nifty suspension that isolates the powertrain from the handles, revs like hell, and also cuts like hell. I got it because this is my backyard(after having some fun with the husky).

I'm so sorry.

e: I'm so sorry you didn't get a Stihl. Because seriously. Can you take it back?

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


mutt2jeff posted:

Also, tungsten and all the other metals they put in these rods is nasty stuff, do not breath it while you are grinding. Get a respirator.

"thorinated" = radioactive!

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


CDI torque is snap-on's wrench manufacturer for all their clickers. Great but expensive. Snap-On branded dial types are still fantastic... if you like dials.

This isn't strictly automotive, but i've been sold on the necessity of a cordless impact driver. The mechs at work use them, and a friend brought his over for a carpentry/plumbing project we collaborated on. I need one now.

Hitachi has the best warranty by far, and rates near the top in reviews i've read online. Makita and Panasonic both rate higher but have a warranty less than half the duration of Hitachi's. Like SLRs, it seems you buy into a family of tools, instead of buying some tools. You get a few batteries, a charger, and then a buttload of bare tool bodies. So far i've been looking at this set to start me off. This is the Hitachi 18v tool page. Lowe's sells this set which is an 18v "compact pro". Admittedly the compact pro drill and driver are probably all I need, but they're also the only two items that use that battery.

So AI. How good are Hitachi cordless power tools?

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


In standard AI form, I have ignored all of your advise. I got a Makita impact drill/impact driver 18v 3AH lithium ion kit. Apaaaaarently, Hitachi has the 10 year warranty because they don't have any local service centers. You've got to send the tool off if it breaks. I've shied away from Dewalt since I was issued some in Germany. I melted one in about 30 seconds of use the first time, and then the other one about a week later.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


Sockington posted:

Is there any other kind of screw? gently caress Mr. Phillips and his stupid rear end stripped out products.

Textron would like a word with you.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


Aeka 2.0 posted:

Anyone know who makes the Snap-On cordless 18v drill? Model CDR4850. I use them a lot but I don't own one and I'm not going to shell out 400 dollars for one.

I don't know who makes them, but the two riding equipment mechanics at work use the 14.4v version. They both say "best purchase ever".

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


the_reject posted:

I've got the same 14.4V drill, and can back up those remarks.

I did not read the post I replied to thoroughly enough. The two mechanics are using the 14.4v 3/8 impact guns.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


I used a speed handle working on my first airplane. Except it used a motorcycle engine. And I only used it for the four bolts that affixed the engine frame to the bulkhead. If you've got room for a speed bar, you can use a cordless impact gun.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


Geared Hub posted:

Q/C is going to be the main thing with chinese goods, something like a big US or Asian firm with full time Q/C staff looking at production and suppliers, you'll end up with a good product from there.

The no name chinese stuff I'd avoid, it would depend if it's a one or two time use "throw away" tool or something I need to put a lot of stress on and use it often.

Stihl recently moved production of its HS45 hedge trimmers and several carburetors to China. These things suck balls. Don't buy a Stihl with a SN starting in 8 ever. We've gotten several new HS45s this summer that start having carburetion issues a week in, so we replace the carb. And then the new carb does the exact same thing. A few customers have returned the trimmer for credit towards a pro model. If Stihl can't keep their Chinese QC levels up to snuff, no company in the world can.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


Troy Bilt doesn't actually make generators, or pressure washers. They're made by B&S Power Products (formerly Generac) under license to MTD.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


Wow, that's a neat trick.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


Speaking of tool boxes, how is the Kennedy brand?

Recently my friend's father passed away. He was a career machinist and my friend now has all his tools and boxes. I'm not looking to cash in on my friend's tragedy, my friend is a calibration tech, so he'll end up using all his dad's tools. I was just impressed by the quality of the boxes when he showed them to me. I've worked out of Craftsman, Snap-On and Matco boxes. They all seemed about equal, and all were blown away by the still tight drawers of a probably 1960's Kennedy set. Plus, I loved the wrinkled brown powder coat, no need to polish.

I looked through Kennedy's catalog and found a 29" roller and two different chests that I like. I googled to find prices, and the pair comes out at $1100-$1200 with ball bearing slides. Are Kennedy boxes good anymore, or should I just go get some Craftsman boxes during the post Christmas sale?

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


v0v even my tiny shop with two techs gets Matco and Snap-On alternating weeks.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


So what you're saying is, we should all call and offer $400?

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


Honestly, it's not possible to get a good pressure washer period for under $700. So buy the cheapest you can find and plan on disposing of it after two seasons.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


SNiPER_Magnum posted:

If your soldering skills are crap, then the joint will crack. A lot of people submit to "the bigger the glob, the better the job" method and just slap it on without good wet solder tension.
Heating the wires will help, but flux is really your friend. Use flux and be amazed.

There's a lot more to soldering than heating wire and sticking some lead and tin on the joint. It's not quite as complex as welding, but you definitely need to read a book or take a class.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


Go to Sears and make your own tool set out of individual packs. I did this for my Mom last year so she would stop commandeering my Dad's tools and stashing them places. Ended up spending about $120.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


Josh Lyman posted:

Should I focus on getting Craftsmen branded stuff or does that not really matter? $120 is a bit more than I'd like to spend but I imagine I could put together a set of essentials for $50.

What's the consensus on a tool boxes vs. bags?

Well, if it says Craftsman on it, you can walk into a Sears in 50 years (assuming it still exists) and get a new tool because you were using your screwdriver like a chisel and broke it. If it says Evolv, you'll need your receipt, and Sears will still tell you to get bent. For me, Craftsman is bare minimum except for 'truck' tools where I get Husky or Kobalt, whichever is cheapest. Although, there was an Evolv hammer for $9.99 that felt better in my hand than any of the $20 Craftsman hammers.

Tool bags are for taking places, tool boxes are for sitting on benches, again IMO.

Sears will have stuff like '8 screw drivers for ' or '10 screw drivers for 11bux' or '18 for 13'. At a certain point, their kits go into ridiculous poo poo you'll never use, so stop before then. Don't get pliers and wrenches with grips. Bare metal is best, or thin foamed rubber because it'll slide off easily in a few years.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


Suniikaa posted:

I took my fathers Craftsman staple gun in to get replaced because the slide wouldn't lock anymore and they basically told me to get hosed, so YMMV.

v0v My mom got her fiberglass pole pruner replaced a few years ago. It was around 20 years old. I can't count how many shovels this family has gotten for free. Craftsman ratchets *are* poo poo, though, and you're almost guaranteed a rebuilt one. A Snap-On ratchet is well worth the $60.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


Nor should any hand tool manufacturer. My grandpa was working for a company that did a lot with piping and radiators. Small stuff up to huge building sized radiators. This company was based in Elyria, Ohio so using Ridge Tools was a no-brainer. On one day, they exchanged four man tall pipe wrenches at no charge. The guy working customer service that day said "I'd like to know the name of the man who bent that!" and the reply he was given was either "John Deere" or "Caterpillar", I can't remember.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


No, they exchanged a quantity of four ginormous pipe wrenches, each of them bent by some sort of large diesel traction machine, in one day. I don't know what the gently caress they were trying to wrench on, and grandpa's been dead for 15 years now.

Sockington posted:

RIGID quality has taken a dive for the worse in the past years - the battery&charging sysem for their portable tools suck serious rear end. We had a whole fleet of batteries die on us from using the gently caress out of them daily (been using DeWalt since with no problems).

Their older stuff is pretty loving tough though.

The electric tools sold under the RIDGID name don't have so much to do with the hand tools, especially pipe fitting tools. They're under one company, but i'm sure if there wasn't the association with Home Depot, most of that stuff wouldn't be made. I'd not buy any of their 18v Li-Ion stuff, but i'm happy with their corded angle grinder. I almost bought their planer and joiner (because they were on sale) but I couldn't justify $900 in tools to make a round top chest for camping.

Skyssx fucked around with this message at 02:54 on Nov 24, 2010

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


Jared592 posted:

I always thought it'd be cool to have something to compress air into those little paintball tanks and then just run air tools off of that (through a regulator). I know Rhino makes something like that that uses CO2 tanks, but some sort of home setup where you could fill your own tanks to very high psi (safely) would be awesome from a mobility and cost standpoint.

Anything remotely high flow would just freeze the tank and suck liquid in under a second.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


IOwnCalculus posted:

I sound like a broken record on this I'm sure but yeah, any jackstand that's stamped should be avoided like the plague.

On cordless tools - I've seen more than a few highly reviewed 18V Lithium Ion impact drivers that are apparently beefy enough to spin off a lug nut (as long as it wasn't spun on with a 200 ft-lb airgun first). I've been thinking about switching from my mix of 14V and 18V Black & Decker stuff to a Lithium Ion set, but can't quite decide.

I'm leaning towards the Milwaukee M18 system by starting off with this and adding on other devices later. Except that they don't have much other than drills and impact wrenches, and I'd at least like a hand vac I can run on the same battery system, which has me leaning slightly towards Makitas instead.

Edit: Hmm, just noticed the badass Milwaukee shop-vac.

Thoughts?

e: You're definitely not going to spin off air gun application bolts with that Milwaukee set. Those are the half capacity batteries and tools. The full sized M18 batteries are twice as thick and the tools that use them are more powerful. Makita has the same thing, except their compact line is white to differentiate it.

Sockington LOVES Dewalt 18v stuff.

I have a few Makita 18v LXT tools, namely the BTD141 impact driver and BHP454 drill. Both really impressed me with their power, especially the hammer drill. I haven't yet come across something that the hammer drill can't power through. It has no problem getting through block walls with concrete bits or through deck posts with spade bits. The side handle makes it really controllable, too. The impact gun is good for what I bought it for, small power equipment and trim pieces. I have attempted to take lug nuts off vehicles with it with no effect. At work today, it also failed to remove two rusted wheel bolts from a 2004 snow blower. It was able to get one of the bolts halfway out, but I think that any more torque on those particular bolts will just shear them anyway. In short, the impact driver I have is good for things that can be broken loose with a ratchet and lots of grunting, or for when you don't want to slap a ratchet back and forth for 45 seconds to get that nylock off.

Makita does make one more powerful model 1/4" chucked impact driver than I have. Their 3/8" drive impact guns appear to have more torque on tap than the 1/4" models. They also make a "high torque" electric impact that is HUGE.

The Makita 18v hand vac and fluorescent lamp are on the christmas list, mainly for camping and laziness in the shop.

Skyssx fucked around with this message at 23:47 on Dec 1, 2010

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


needknees posted:

There's a ton of them out there, anything in particular I should be looking for? And while I'm not going to need something crazy powerful / heavy duty, it is going to get used frequently. probably 3-4x month or more since I'll probably wash my car with it too, along with the streetbike so I don't want a total cheapo one.

If you want something that will last decently, you need to spend 700-1000. There's only two components to a power washer, engine and pump. Good units have a quality brand of each component. Mediocre units have one quality brand. Disposable units have neither.

Hands down the best engine you could run a power washer with is the Honda GX 390. The GX engine series is their professional line and is extremely durable. The 390 is the most powerful at 11 or 13 HP, I can't remember. Comparable engines include the Kohler Command Pro, Briggs Vanguard and "Subaru" Robin engines. Kawasaki only makes pro quality engines, but I don't think anyone uses them on a power washer. Middle quality engines will be the Honda GC engines, Briggs Intek and possibly an old stock Tecumseh engine. Low quality engines will be Briggs "Professional" engines and manufacturer branded Chinese Intek and GX knock offs. These are the pits.

The two best names in pumps are CAT and Annovi-Reverberi. Karcher makes the most pumps, but their products compete on value, not on total cost of ownership. If you get corrosion in a Karcher, you buy a new pump. CAT and AR are rebuildable indefinitely. AR isn't necessarily going to be branded, but they have a distinctive design language. Look them up on the web before going out.

There are far less brands in pressure washers than it would appear, particularly at the big box stores. The majority of washers are made by Briggs and Stratton Power Products (formerly Generac), and nowadays feature mostly Briggs engines. Every MTD brand washer is actually made under license by BSPP, and the label will say so. There are some John Deere units at Lowes that have Honda GX engines and are BSPP units. Ridgid tools is new at the game. They use high dollar pumps and then compromise a bit on the engines to compete on price. As much as I like their CAT pumps, that's the easiest part to fix, i'd go for a GX engine first.

Finally, https://www.smallenginewarehouse.com is where you are going to go if you ever have pump issues. If you have a strong engine, a decent frame and some good accessories, it's worth it to re-pump a failed unit for a few hundred. This summer, we did just that to a guy's Cub Cadet professional model washer. CC only made them for two years and parts were non-existent. We are a Kohler dealer, though, so that wasn't a problem, and we just stuck an A-R pump on and called it good. It was less pretty than the original set up, but worked better. For shop use, we've got a BSPP "Elite" series unit with an Intek engine and an A-R pump, it is used daily with no issues, but is somewhat lacking in the feature department.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


I have a lack of experience with electric power equipment, I hear the 240v washers are what to aim for. Electrics do spin the pump at 1800 rather than 3600 RPM, leading to longer pump life. Top dollar gas washers run a belt reduction to accomplish the same ends.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


The more you use them, the better off the machine, usually.

Things that will kill a pressure washer pump:
Using a detergent, then failing to completely flush with clear water prior to storage.
Highly mineralized water.
Leaving the unit in your freezing garage (100%).
Failing to purge the pump with alcohol or branded Pump Saver prior to winter.
Pinhole leaks on high side of pump, resulting in continuous cycling of unloader valve.

Things that will damage a pressure washer engine are the same things you need to look out for with your lawn mower. One thing from the pump list puts a lot of strain on the engine, a high side leak cycling the unloader valve. Then the engine goes from 10%<>100%<>10% load repeatedly. You're going to get back firing like crazy, blown exhaust gaskets and possible valve damage. Governor shaft and throttle shaft wear will also occur, but that's going to happen anyway every time you hit the sprayer lever.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


Used my Makita hex impact driver to remove and reinstall blade bolts I know were air impacted in last year. Pretty stoked about that.

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Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


This very forum has pictures of a new (unused) GM scissor jack failing catastrophically by stripping every thread on the screw. It's a horrible design for a lift.

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