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nadmonk
Nov 26, 2017

The spice must flow in and through me.
The fire will cleanse me body and soul.


MomJeans420 posted:

Is a HF vise decent enough for someone who very rarely needs a vise? I looked on CL for a good deal and a new HF one was cheaper than the heavily used CL ones, plus HF is closer and I don't have to deal with people from CL.

I'm pretty much the same use case, I went with a WEN 5" vise. It was $40 and I've been pretty impressed with the quality of it at that price point.
I'm not sure it would stand up to heavy duty daily use, but for occasional stuff it's been great.

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nadmonk
Nov 26, 2017

The spice must flow in and through me.
The fire will cleanse me body and soul.


Wrar posted:

Should I get an 8" bench grinder or a 6"?

I went with the 8" and haven't regretted it, for what it's worth.

nadmonk
Nov 26, 2017

The spice must flow in and through me.
The fire will cleanse me body and soul.


Rhyno posted:

Menards? It'll be their store brand but their warranty is solid.

I don't have a Menard's super close, but Home Depot's Husky brand is my general go to for things like that.
I've never needed to use their warranty on sockets, but for other tools (I may or may not have abused in ways they did not intend) getting a replacement was no questions asked, show up, give them the tool, grab one that looks about the same, walk out.

nadmonk
Nov 26, 2017

The spice must flow in and through me.
The fire will cleanse me body and soul.


Rather than being productive last week, I decided to troll eBay for vintage Mitutoyo vernier calipers.
I did not come away empty handed.


The iGaging digital caliper at the bottom I already had. For the money, I highly recommend it. It seems accurate enough for general purpose use and provides consistent measurements. One word of caution: take the battery out when not using it as it will drain them when turned off. But for $20, you really can't go wrong.
The iGaging depth gauge on the left I also just got. I haven't used it much. It does not seem to be the most durable construction, mostly plastic. But it does seem to be accurate and give consistent results.

iGaging


Mitutoyo slide caliper

I do wish it had a thumb wheel, but considering one of these new is around $200 and I got this for $40, I won't complain too much.

Mitutoyo dial vernier caliper

Also only $40.

The slide caliper had some splatters on it, maybe paint?

A little light Scotch Brite action got it off.

They were both a little dirty but cleaned up nicely and seem to be in good working order.

nadmonk
Nov 26, 2017

The spice must flow in and through me.
The fire will cleanse me body and soul.


cakesmith handyman posted:

If you measure the same thing with all of them how do they compare?

Good find also, I need to do some similar shopping, specifically a 150mm and another 70mm if I can find one.

I had done a rough comparison with each other and could tell they weren't miles apart.
I actually just checked them against the width of a ruler:


iGaging: 0.4955 in


Mitutoyo vernier calipers: 0.492 in (technically ~ 63/128 in.)


Mitutoyo dial calipers: 0.496 in


I say that's not too bad.

nadmonk
Nov 26, 2017

The spice must flow in and through me.
The fire will cleanse me body and soul.


sharkytm posted:

Those are old iGauging. The new ones take the CR2032 and don't seem to drain the batteries at all. The HFs and others that take the LR44 button cells all drain crazy fast the on/off button just turns off the display, not the sensor.

Nice score on the Mitutoyo gear.

Thanks!

This iGaging does actually take the CR2032 as well. It isn't a terrible drain, but it is enough that if you leave it for a few weeks or so you might find it dead.
Maybe I'd just been leaving it turned on by accident or something. Now as force of habit I just pop the battery out when I'm done.

nadmonk
Nov 26, 2017

The spice must flow in and through me.
The fire will cleanse me body and soul.


I was on eBay looking at vintage precision measurement tools again (help, I have a problem), when I came across this old Starrett micrometer and pulled the trigger:


The listing said they mechanically worked fine. I figured at the cost I really couldn't go wrong and I could probably clean them up a bit.
Shortly after buying them the seller contacted me saying while they had worked fine before, they tried loosening a screw on them and it broke but they had another nicer Starrett micrometer they would send me instead if that was OK. I figured for $11 I still couldn't go wrong but kept my expectations in check.

I feel like I hit the jackpot on what I received:







They work great and appear to be accurate (maybe I should hunt for some vintage gauge blocks to really verify........).

nadmonk
Nov 26, 2017

The spice must flow in and through me.
The fire will cleanse me body and soul.


I found a relatively cheap Last Long Safety Hammer No. 2 on eBay.
So nature took its course.




A cheap hammer gave up its handle for it.
I haven't put in a pin across as I will likely go for a new handle at some point for a more permanent solution, but I wanted to get a better idea of how it felt and looked. But it is definitely secure enough for the time being.
Really the polar opposite of the recent micrometer finds.

nadmonk
Nov 26, 2017

The spice must flow in and through me.
The fire will cleanse me body and soul.


NinjaTech posted:

I've got the 6ton ones but already used them for pulling my silverado's transmission and reinstalling after the rebuild a couple years ago. Maybe I got ones that aren't bad?

If they are covered in the recall I definitely wouldn't trust them.

nadmonk
Nov 26, 2017

The spice must flow in and through me.
The fire will cleanse me body and soul.


kastein posted:

Mine have lived outside for most of the last ten years (or less depending on which set it is, I own way too many of them) and there's ZERO chance I'll be able to read the stickers. Wonder if they'll take them.

Throw the stands through their window from your vehicle as you drive by, that way they can't give them back.

nadmonk
Nov 26, 2017

The spice must flow in and through me.
The fire will cleanse me body and soul.


Wrar posted:

Project Farm had a video on it last month.
https://youtu.be/XVTn6wI4g6s

I can't remember the result or I'd just tell you.

I don't remember being too blown away by any of them. I think the Dewalt and Irwin did fine for the money. I definitely don't remember the highest priced ones doing that much better to justify the cost.

nadmonk
Nov 26, 2017

The spice must flow in and through me.
The fire will cleanse me body and soul.


Only slightly tool related and only slightly automotive tool related at that, but people seemed to like the vintage calipers I got. So to let everyone know they are now well protected:
I built a couple of boxes for them. This was my first attempt at building boxes so they are far from perfect, but I think they came out ok.
I used the vinyl leather wrap for speakers / amps as the covering and 1/4" plywood for the structure (wood glue and 18ga x 5/8" brads to hold it together) and a lot of 3M 77 spray adhesive. I did use contact cement for the outside covering for the first box, that worked much better, but I didn't have enough to do the second. The spray adhesive works great on the inside felt lining.

First box:



Second box, I had left over materials. Not sure this one turned out quite as well, but a bit more general purpose:



Any how...back to your regularly scheduled automotive tools.

nadmonk
Nov 26, 2017

The spice must flow in and through me.
The fire will cleanse me body and soul.


sharkytm posted:

Those are really nice. Care to detail how you made them? My wife needs an oboe case re-felted, and I've got zero clue how to even approach it.

I could, but I don't know how much I'd trust my methods

The basic method I used was pretty similar to how Adam Savage builds his display boxes. Although I think he uses a 22ga brad nailer.
The 18ga I used worked fine, just needed to be extra careful with angle. Honestly, I think the box would have been reasonably strong just using wood glue.

Basic steps:
Used 1/4" plywood (I think some decent looking birch stuff, but that was only because I wasn't sure if I wanted to leave the wood exposed or not)
Cut the various sides to size.
One mistake I made there that I would do differently, is where the sides are split where it opens. When I did it, I cut the opening in those side pieces before assembling the box. If I did it next time, I would assemble the box first, then use the table saw to cut it open.
This Tested video gives a pretty good overview of what he does: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jPAGZpNZrwU

After the box was together, I figured out where I wanted stuff to go inside and cut some other pieces of wood to be dividers and holds. A couple are secured with wood glue and brads, but I found the brads really difficult to get lined up right and the wood glue seemed to hold fine on its own, especially for the pieces that ran from one side to another.

The felt I put in as separate pieces. I'm not sure if this is the right way at all, but it seemed ok.
I cut pieces that matched the footprint of the flat bottom pieces. Where there are those vertical supports sticking up through the middle, I just cut a slit about the size for those to poke through.
Then I cut other pieces to cover the vertical bits. I tried to use one piece for each vertical support other than the outside perimeter doing test fits and adjusting until I could get it to completely cover and wrap around all sides.
3M Super 77 worked great for adhering the felt. I sprayed the felt, then stuck on as carefully as I could.

For the exterior, I used a knockoff Tolex. I believe they make stuff that is more paper like. This is fairly substantial and more akin to leather.

I did the top and bottom each as single pieces.
A couple I did with 3m Super 77 to stick it and a couple with contact cement.
Contact cement is really the way to go. It had better coverage and instant hold so less bubbles and better control at getting the edges to hold.
The little spots at the edges where they pulled up a bit (mostly a problem when I used Super 77 instead of contact cement) I just used some cyanoacrylate glue to keep them together and down.

Finish it off with some cheap brass hardware from Amazon for the corners and hinges.
For an oboe or anything with a bit more heft that calipers, I'd say maybe beef up the supports you use inside. I'd imagine a little bump and it might just snap off little vertical tabs of 1/4" ply.

Honestly, a good way might be if you can find some foam rubber inserts, sculpt to match, then adhere the felt to that, with another piece of foam at the top also covered in felt. That would give it a nice secure hold.

Hope that helps!

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nadmonk
Nov 26, 2017

The spice must flow in and through me.
The fire will cleanse me body and soul.


sharkytm posted:

Thanks for the info. I'm really not sure how the cases are made internally, but it looks like it's discrete pieces of wood, glued/pinned in place, and then the felt covers all sins. I wasn't sure if you had a trick for using one piece of felt and avoiding edges. It seems like a royal PITA to get everything lined up and glued without gaps or wrinkles.

The felt does a pretty good job of hiding mistakes. Even little gaps between the discrete pieces you can kind of massage together.
Mostly, I just tried to cut as large a pieces as possible for each contiguous section. Those vertical pieces essentially have a piece of felt as large as their surface area (both flats, top, both skinny sides). I'm sure there are better ways to do it, but it seemed to work ok. There are a couple of spots where I needed to cut little slivers to fill in. But thankfully the felt does a decent job of hiding that, and with the Super 77, once it's dry, it doesn't move anywhere.

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