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Nitrox
Jul 5, 2002

Slur, your fighting style is extremely problematic!

Edit: Can anyone explain how those things work? ^^^

I keep a 7 gallon aluminum tank with the same hose setup for random tire inflations. Easy to refill and has enough air for 4 tires. Bought it all from HF many years ago and it wasn't more than $50.

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Nitrox
Jul 5, 2002

Slur, your fighting style is extremely problematic!

Maxwedge posted:

I don't know if your talking about air or Co2 but this is different than a normal air tank. The Co2 is under high pressure (1200-1500psi) The tank is tested to 3000 psi iirc. So the Co2 is in liquid form and has a lot more energy than compressed air. So a 10lb tank of Co2 can air up about 20-25 normal car tires.
I understand that you have a co2, I'm just stating what I have an air tank with hose and regulator, that serves the same function, only cheaper. It holds enough air to play with pressure at the track and cost nothing to refill.

sharkytm posted:

The LM-1 is a good kit, but the same functionality can be recreated for less. The LC1 is $130, and a gauge is pretty cheap. Whichever way you go, Innovate is a great company, and makes good products.
Where can I get it for $130? The Innovative website says $199.

Nitrox
Jul 5, 2002

Slur, your fighting style is extremely problematic!

Speaking of Ryobi tools.

I have one of every cordless tools made by Ryobi, except the new Lithium ion line. And I've been using them daily for the last 4 years. Here is a quick rundown on their pros and cons.

Worst con: Batteries.
The power output is far from linear, and once the battery is at 50% capacity or less, they drop amperage. They don't age gracefully as well, older batteries begin to loose charge after a little while. I still have batteries that are 4 years old, but they stay in the garage. Charging also takes much longer than advertised 1 hour. Also, continuous draw eats power like there is no tomorrow. Compared to other cordless tools on the market, the output of Ryobi batteries is just shameful.

Best tool:


I use it to drive screws, lags, bolts, lug nuts, and drill through just about anything. The torque is great and it's smaller than a drill. Every carpenter I worked with have bought one to match their cordless tool collection. And while the Makita or Bosch impact guns have their advantages, you can't beat Ryobi when it comes to price.

The rest:
Due to lovely battery power delivery, every tool that is designed for continuous draw will suck balls after about 3 minutes of use. That goes for grinders, polishers, drills, vacuums, etc. They will work for some time if used conservatively in short bursts, but if you need to do anything for prolonged periods of time, get a corded tool. The worst thing is to not being able to finish cutting a sheet of plywood because you're out of juice.

Special notes:
The Ryobi Sawzall does not output 18v and whatever amperage it's supposed to. You can make it kick a hell of a lot more rear end by removing the voltage regulator and the safety switch. I've modified 2 so far and it's a night and day difference. The new Lithium-ion does not have this problem.

Ryobi radio is loving awesome. For $29 it's small, rugged and has an audio jack for an Ipod or Stilleto.

The cordless stapler/brad nailer sucks extra hard. Avoid at all costs.

Conclusion:
Ryobi is great set of tolls to keep in the garage for small home and automotive projects. Tools like sander, saw, grinder, vacuum, polisher are best when they are plugged in, and cheaper too. To put together a good kit I would get: The new Lithium-ion set, plus the above mentioned impact driver and a radio. Everything else you're better off buying corded.

Nitrox
Jul 5, 2002

Slur, your fighting style is extremely problematic!

ChiliMac posted:

How long will a 2 gallon 115psi tank last for common tasks (compare a few if you need to)?

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ct...temnumber=94724 is going to be on sale this weekend for 60 bucks. This one has a 1.5 HP compressor.

edit: I see some seperate 10 gallon air tanks--can you daisy chain with the compressor and effectively get a 1.5hp 12gallon compressor for like 100 bucks?

editx2: er.. not sure if that's worth it if you can just get this instead: http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ct...temnumber=90234
Get a 10 gallon if you need to do anything other than shoot brad nails. And if you need to run a grinder, go up to 20 gallon.

Nitrox
Jul 5, 2002

Slur, your fighting style is extremely problematic!

leica posted:

Can you tell me how to do this? This is awesome, I've always thought mine was way under powered.

Also, aren't the new lithium batteries interchangeable? I could have sworn they said you can use them on any Ryobi tools. If so, do you think it would be worthwhile to upgrade? I have almost every Ryobi cordless too, I was thinking about the impact, but you have sold me on it. Do you have the air compressor? I've been thinking of getting that also.
They ARE interchangeable! If you can, avoid the old batteries at all.

I wish that I could post a picture of my saw, but it's rather simple. Get a toggle switch, like this one and about 12" of wire. Take the saw apart, remove one part of the plastic casing. Now you see 2 wires running from the battery into the safety switch, trigger and regulator and then into the motor. Cut the wires at battery and motor, leaving some slack. Remove everything in between. Now run a wire from battery straight to motor, and another batter>switch>motor. Mission accomplished. When you put it back together, the ridge on the casing should hold the switch very tight. If not, get a larger switch.

Here is a crude drawing to help you understand it better.

Nitrox
Jul 5, 2002

Slur, your fighting style is extremely problematic!

leica posted:

Cool. But are the lithium that much better? I know they charge faster, but do they hold it longer, and do they put out more power? My kit is still fairly new, so I don't think I'll need batteries any time soon, but if the Lithium batteries can help me part the Red Sea I may just invest in some.

Also thanks for the crude drawing.
The new batteries are lighter, charge faster and don't have the annoying power drop off like the old ones do. If your batteries are new and you are not a full time handyman, they should work fine for a while.

Get the impact driver, you'll thank me later.


Can anyone recommend me a good soldering iron? I would like to get a good cheap one if there is such thing.

Nitrox
Jul 5, 2002

Slur, your fighting style is extremely problematic!

Delivery McGee posted:

Can you beef it up/remove the safety while keeping the original trigger? The variable speed is a big thing for me. I'm satisfied (so far) with the power, but I'd love to take out that stupid-rear end safety button.
No idea, but I'm sure it's possible.

I did it because never in my right mind would I use anything between "go" and "stop". Plus I don't have to have my finger on the trigger when the saw is running. Makes overhead cutting much easier.

Nitrox
Jul 5, 2002

Slur, your fighting style is extremely problematic!

Octavio Barnaby Sr. posted:

How have your batteries lasted?
A buddy of mine at the cabinet shop I work at has killed 3 Ryobi li-ion batteries in a few months, and I know he doesn't overcharge them.
I need to replace all of my Dewalt 18.8 stuff, and I'm debating between Makita and Hitachi. I love both Makita and Hitachi, but have never used any Hitachi cordless stuff. For how much cheaper it is, I'd definately give Ryobi stuff a try if it has really gotten better than some of their crappy old stuff.

I'm probably going to get a drill, impact driver, and circular saw, and 3 extra batteries since I go through between 2 and 3 a day on my main drill.
Anyone used the newer (white casing)Makita Li-ion stuff yet?
What about Dewalt's new batteries? http://www.dewalt.com/us/products/a...productID=17720
I have about 5 weeks on my li-ion batteries and they are holding up fine. Online reviews that I linked above also mentioned batteries dying at random. If anything going to happen to my batteries, I'll just march back to the store and get them replaced.

A guy I work with has a bunch of Makita cordless tools, and they do rock. Not as much as 28v Milwaukee, but close.

Why are you replacing all of your Dewalt tools all of a sudden?

Nitrox
Jul 5, 2002

Slur, your fighting style is extremely problematic!

sharkytm posted:

Is it really necessary to apply 1 foot-pound precisely. You can do that with a screwdriver, just finger tight would be 1ftlb.
Ha, that's great. I haven't used a torque wrench since rebuilding my last engine. Everything else is just hand/hammer tight.

Some clown on freshalloy forums was using a torque wrench on the interior trim pieces. I didn't believe it and had to look it up, but there are actual torque ratings on screws that hold up the center console.

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Nitrox
Jul 5, 2002

Slur, your fighting style is extremely problematic!

Octavio Barnaby Sr. posted:

I'd rather have one system with one battery type if possible, and all of my batteries save for one are weak.
Since it's still got a good battery, one of the newer guys at work who is an installer's helper was interested in buying it, so I figured I'd give him a hookup deal on it. It's the least i could do since my drill and right angle drill were basically given to me by the dude I started out under.
Also, I'm a tool whore and want new stuff.
What trade are you in?

I make counter tops and install kitchens. So my cordless tolls don't get much abuse until those rare days when we have to rebuild 1/3rd of someone's house in less than a week. I have noticed that almost every electrician has a soft spot for Dewalt, while plumbers tends to stick with Milwaukee/Makita combos.

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