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EvilDonald
Aug 30, 2002

I'm the urban spaceman, baby.

One of these, in 1/2" and 9/16", is the single greatest wrench ever. I have a Craftsman one, but they don't show it on their site. They probably discontinued it, as it's not gimmicky.

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EvilDonald fucked around with this message at 00:00 on Mar 6, 2008

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EvilDonald
Aug 30, 2002

I'm the urban spaceman, baby.

BabyJesus posted:

Funny you mention all the tire+lube grease monkeys. They all use torque wrenches by me. I've seen them do it. Maybe they finally caught word it's faster to torque the lugnut properly than to replace a wheel stud/lugnut

Do they actually torque the lugnut properly or do they simply use the torque wrench as a ratchet? I've never seen a tire monkey use a torque wrench correctly. Ever.

EvilDonald
Aug 30, 2002

I'm the urban spaceman, baby.

Delivery McGee posted:



The big chrome thing is a "speeder", and I haven't seen one in forever. I didn't think they were still made, cordless drills have made them pretty much obsolete. The idea is that you can use a deep well socket to run a nut down a long bolt by turning the deal like an old brace and bit.

EvilDonald
Aug 30, 2002

I'm the urban spaceman, baby.

quote:

torque sticks

I always use the organic torque wrench for wheels. Just get them...tight.

I never really saw the point of torque sticks unless you're a tire buster. Unless you do several cars a day it doesn't seem worth the expense to buy a tool to give you an iffy torque quickly when a beam wrench is cheaper and more accurate.

EvilDonald
Aug 30, 2002

I'm the urban spaceman, baby.

Taymar posted:

Is there anything wrong with setting a cheap clicker torque wrench by the readout on a (more accurate?) beam style one, then using the clicker one for torquing the bolt?

Not an ideal situation by any means, but would this work?

I wouldn't use it for critical stuff, engine internals and the like. That gets a beam wrench, even a cheapy one from Napa will be pretty accurate. The Harbor Frieght clicky one should be adequate for less critical stuff, things that are easily accessible and can tolerate a little overtorquing. Lug nuts, starters, that kind of thing.

I would check its accuracy periodically, though. Get a beam wrench and a 3/8" or 1/2" square socket, whatever your wrench is. Set the click wrench to the desired torque, wrap the shaft of it in a rag and gently secure it in a vise. Now torque on it with the beam wrench and be sure it clicks at roughly the right time. Without spending tons of money on one you won't get a terribly accurate clicky wrench, but you can certainly find one that's "close enough".

EvilDonald
Aug 30, 2002

I'm the urban spaceman, baby.

Elviscat posted:

on the topic of Dremel clone, I have a B&D knockoff that has a motor on a swivel mounted base, with a felxible driveshaft to a little handpiece, and it's loving great, shitloads of torque, and the handpiece is so small it'll fit anywhere.

Don't know the price unfortunately, since it's a hand-me-down from my dad.

So it's a good one. Black and Decker used to be pretty good tools, but in the last 20 years they're complete poo poo. I burned up a brand new B&D drill on two 1/4 inch holes in sheet metal. True, it was the cheapest one Wallly World had, but Goddamn.

Napa hand tools are surprisingly good. I've pretty much given up on Craftsman, sadly. They used to be my standby. For power tools I go with Milwaukee or Bosch. More expensive, but I'll never have to replace them. There are other good ones, but I know those two.\

HF is hit or miss, thy may work great at first, then burn up next week. Not bad for one of those "I've never needed this before" tools.

EvilDonald
Aug 30, 2002

I'm the urban spaceman, baby.

Korwen posted:



Craftsman stuff is passable, but not what it used to be. I've been buying Blackhawk and K-D from Napa and Carquest lately. If it's what's available you can do much worse than Craftsman, but it isn't something to seek out anymore.

I wouldn't get ratchet wrenches and that kind of thing until you've built up a good collection of the basic stuff. A set of combination wrenches, ratchet sets in 1/4, 3/8 and 1/2, the regular old school toolkit. Then if you find a need for something special, like "MAN that one drat battery clamp is hard to get to and I take it off a lot, a 1/2" rathet wrench would be just the thing!", go get a 1/2" ratchet wrench, not a whole set.

EvilDonald
Aug 30, 2002

I'm the urban spaceman, baby.

RealKyleH posted:

Buy good 3/8, 1/4, and 1/2 ratchets. They all wear out eventually but the ones that come in like wal mart sets and even those blackhawk ones I have worn out very very quickly. Craftsman wear out too but generally hold up much better than those previously mentioned and when they wear out you just get a free replacement.

The problem I've had with Craftsman ratchets lately is the little selector lever breaking off. They used to be pot metal, but now they're just plastic and come off easily. Then I take it to Sears and they won't exchange it on the spot anymore, they send it off somewhere and I get a rebuilt one in the mail like a month later.

Maybe that's just my Sears, but they've made it not worth the effort. I need to bite the bullet and chase down a Snapon truck.

EvilDonald
Aug 30, 2002

I'm the urban spaceman, baby.

Uthor posted:

I got a set of 8 Craftsman screwdrivers for like $15, which I feel is a solid investment.

I'm sold on Klein screwdrivers now. A bit pricey, but they're absolutely wonderful screwdrivers. Their pliers rock, too.

EvilDonald
Aug 30, 2002

I'm the urban spaceman, baby.

I believe it. My sister had a '62 Bel Air, and it didn't have a fuel filter. Consequently, every now and then the float needle would get a bit of gunk in it and the carb would overfill and start choking out the engine. This symptom could be treated with a 1/2lb Rock.

Apply the Rock to the problematic carburetor, carefully of course to avoid damage, and you could jostle the offending bit of crud loose from the valve.

EvilDonald
Aug 30, 2002

I'm the urban spaceman, baby.

Tony Macaroni posted:

Harbor Freight's brake caliper tool made changing my rear pads a peice of cake, took only 20 minutes per side.

I like this brake caliper tool, myself:

http://tinyurl.com/6gc39v

EvilDonald
Aug 30, 2002

I'm the urban spaceman, baby.

ease posted:

Have you ever done rear disc brakes? On most foreign cars (not sure about US) you need to push in and rotate at the same time because of the screw type e-brake mechanism.

Nope. Sounds needlessly complicated. [/luddite]

EvilDonald
Aug 30, 2002

I'm the urban spaceman, baby.

Suniikaa posted:

Edit: Jetting story. When my father was working cross Canada installing fiber, one day they were doing a bridge and the jetter wasn't working right. They tied a plastic bag to the fiber and set up a shop vac at the other end then went for lunch. Worked Beautiful.

Yeah,they make these doojiggers for pulling wire like that. If you have a long conduit to pull through you tie your fish line to this stopper thing and shove it in there, then put a shop vac on the other end to suck it through. I hear they work pretty well.

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EvilDonald
Aug 30, 2002

I'm the urban spaceman, baby.

RealKyleH posted:

Why?

Because the "I'd rather be shopping at snapon.com" one was twelve dollars.

But it was made of blue anodized billet aluminum and came with a "built for mod sassinator" plaque.

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