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frozenphil
Mar 13, 2003

YOU CANNOT MAKE A MISTAKE SO BIG THAT 80 GRIT CAN'T FIX IT!


giundy posted:

Is there any point to a 110V welder? I'm thinking it may be a good a idea for any project and don't see a reason not to have one. The whole 220V thing though would require a new outlet in the garage.

I used a Lincoln 110v welder pretty much exclusively on my Mustang project. I seriously doubt most people would ever need the beef of a 220v welder at their house.

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frozenphil
Mar 13, 2003

YOU CANNOT MAKE A MISTAKE SO BIG THAT 80 GRIT CAN'T FIX IT!


Hypnolobster posted:

Anyone want to recommend me a wideband air/fuel ratio monitor?

Stick with the standard, the LM-1. If you need a permanently mounted one instead of handheld, the LC-1 is it.

frozenphil
Mar 13, 2003

YOU CANNOT MAKE A MISTAKE SO BIG THAT 80 GRIT CAN'T FIX IT!


Uthor posted:

My dad picked up a 6 gallon DeWalt compressor (I can't to find it online) for some reason. I mean, he doesn't have a need for one other than filling tires, but whatever. I think it's 1.5 hp.

Anyway, is that big enough for anything useful? I'm pretty sure it's good enough to run a nailer or a stapler. I'm assuming grinders and such are out of the question. Would it be able to handle an impact wrench? It'd be nice to get a cheap one for at least removing lug nuts.

As Stern said, it will do most of the stuff a weekend mechanic needs. As far as impact wrenches go, a good electric impact will handle lug nuts all day.

frozenphil
Mar 13, 2003

YOU CANNOT MAKE A MISTAKE SO BIG THAT 80 GRIT CAN'T FIX IT!


Hit an Apex posted:

I now am high on the idea of buying a pegboard for my garage. HF has them for $100! Northerntool for $70 with lovely reviews. Anywhere else? Samsclub popped up on Google but want to know if anyone has some experience here first.

Pegboard is pegboard is pegboard. It's just a piece of MDF with holes in it; buy whatever is cheapest.

frozenphil
Mar 13, 2003

YOU CANNOT MAKE A MISTAKE SO BIG THAT 80 GRIT CAN'T FIX IT!


IOwnCalculus posted:

I just got one like that for Christmas. Holy poo poo is it nice not having my random bolts and other leftovers strewn all over the garage.

Don't you have a fender and some baggies to store your bolts?

frozenphil
Mar 13, 2003

YOU CANNOT MAKE A MISTAKE SO BIG THAT 80 GRIT CAN'T FIX IT!


IOwnCalculus posted:

That was my previous storage solution, except that my fender can run and be legally driven

Except right now, because I need to put on two new front tires and get a new battery...

My car runs, is registered, and is insured. Legally I can drive it on the roads in Alabama since we don't have any of those pansy safety or emissions checks. Suck it down.

frozenphil
Mar 13, 2003

YOU CANNOT MAKE A MISTAKE SO BIG THAT 80 GRIT CAN'T FIX IT!


ACEofsnett posted:

I've had good luck with the harbor freight Air compressor I picked up like 8 months ago - it hasn't had any issues, even in my often freezing cold garage. However - sandblasting requires a huge and CONSTANT supply of air. Soda blasting requires that, and more. Think massive CFM screw-powered compressors. Even a 100 gallon+ piston powered air compressor will be running almost constantly while sandblasting, and that's simply assuming you are using a small cabinet, not a free-standing compressor. Go the cabinet route if you have small parts, otherwise plan on being very annoyed waiting for your compressor to catch up. Lot's of places will do very cheap soda / sand blasting for you if you have a bare body or frame. Some will even come to you if you go the soda route. They will just blast the thing you want blasted and the soda simply washes away in the next rain.

Also - Can someone recommend me a decent welder to start repairing panels with? How are the harbor freight mig's? Decent? I really want to get into welding repair panels, but I'm not sure where to start.

Agreeing with this. A compressor that can keep up with the demands of sandblasting an entire vehicle will run you tens of thousands of dollars; then you need to purchase the actual sandblasting stuff. If you try to use one of those little spot blasters you will want to kill yourself after the first hour it takes you to blast a quarter of a fender that you just warped to poo poo from the heat.

Strip the truck down to the frame and body shell, find a local blaster, and haul it in to them. You should be able to get both done for around $500 to $750. I got my Mustang blasted for $400 because I went in during a slow time. If you want them to do a really good job, consider buying, renting, or building a rotisserie for your body so they can get all over the thing. They more than likely won't provide you one and will just shoot the body as it sits, not shooting any parts they can't get to easily.

ACEofsnett: This Miller 180 is a good deal. It takes standard 1 phase 230v power, but it will do anything you will ever need a welder to do. Cheap welders suck tremendously and you won't learn very well on them. Buy the right tool the first time so you can actually learn how to weld instead of fighting the machine the entire time. 115v welders are fine if you don't want to pay an electrician to put in another 230 outlet for you. I just like the flexibility of a 230v outlet/welder.

It's important to note that I am in the Miller camp. I think their welders are superior to Lincoln, but opinions and assholes and all that. I just know that I've never seen someone who welds for their paycheck use anything other than a Miller.

frozenphil
Mar 13, 2003

YOU CANNOT MAKE A MISTAKE SO BIG THAT 80 GRIT CAN'T FIX IT!


ACEofsnett posted:

Not disregarding what you said, but I just don't have that kind of money. As a reasonable alternative, would this work for minor panel repair and fabrication : http://providence.craigslist.org/tls/989247404.html ? I really don't know anything about welding.

If you just want to melt some poo poo together any old thing will work. If you want to have a quality piece of equipment that you don't have to fight against to get the job done and that will last your lifetime, you have to pay for it. It's up to you. Spend a hundred dollars every time you want to do a job or spend $800 once and have a tool that will work well for the rest of your life.

frozenphil
Mar 13, 2003

YOU CANNOT MAKE A MISTAKE SO BIG THAT 80 GRIT CAN'T FIX IT!


CatBus posted:

I'll have to disagree here. You can get a 15hp IR unit, pumping ~50ACFM @175PSI for ~$3.5k. Pretty much anything over 7.5hp is going to be three phase, ruling out many residential users, but that isn't the argument. The price is WAY less than tens of thousands of dollars, and I guarantee that no professional, let alone portable professional, setup requires more air than that.

I've done a few hundred hours of blasting using my 7.5hp unit (single phase), which is pushing 26ACFM @175psi, and it can catch up like I'm not even using air, when I'm sandblasting.

I'm not saying the guy should do it himself, but it's certainly not out of the question to buy a decent compressor that can put out WAY more air than you will ever use.

I didn't realize those IR units had fallen in price that much. At any rate, they aren't really economical for home use for a single project and that compressor will be overkill for basically anything you will ever do at home. The point still stands that having a shop do it is the smarter idea.

frozenphil
Mar 13, 2003

YOU CANNOT MAKE A MISTAKE SO BIG THAT 80 GRIT CAN'T FIX IT!


RealKyleH posted:



An air belt sander. Really Harbor Freight? What could you ever need this for?

There are dozens of specialty body work tools that you will never know are useful until you see them in use. I used an air sander much like the one in the picture pretty extensively when shaping this corner.



frozenphil
Mar 13, 2003

YOU CANNOT MAKE A MISTAKE SO BIG THAT 80 GRIT CAN'T FIX IT!


daslog posted:



$30 at Harbor Freight!!

I don't care if it breaks easy. I just need it for one car.

I used a sander similar to this with the palm trigger and let me tell you, whoever thought putting a piece of hard, angular metal underneath your palm on a vibrating product was a good idea can go gently caress themselves. Your hands are going to hate you and you are going to need help opening jars or holding anything for a few days if you use this sander any length of time.

frozenphil
Mar 13, 2003

YOU CANNOT MAKE A MISTAKE SO BIG THAT 80 GRIT CAN'T FIX IT!


meatpimp posted:

That scares the gently caress out of me.

Why?

frozenphil
Mar 13, 2003

YOU CANNOT MAKE A MISTAKE SO BIG THAT 80 GRIT CAN'T FIX IT!


Weissbier posted:

Thanks. I placed an order for this and got it in yesterday.

Next items on the list are some hand wrenches and a torque wrench. I figure craftsman for the torque wrench and possibly Harbor Freight for the wrenches. I don't remember anyone commenting about HB wrenches - any thoughts?

Torque wrenches are one of the few tools that it pays to buy quality for the home DIY type people if you actually need a torque wrench for something other than being a enjoyable human being and using them to put on wheels or something. I'd put ratchet wrenches in the "buy quality" category too if you do any kind of regular work with your stuff at home.

frozenphil
Mar 13, 2003

YOU CANNOT MAKE A MISTAKE SO BIG THAT 80 GRIT CAN'T FIX IT!


rockcity posted:

I can vouch for my 1/2" Harbor Freight torque wrench. It's quite sizeable, maybe 16" or so so it's got some great leverage for torquing lug nuts or just loosening the stubborn ones.

How can you vouch for it other than to say "it turns stuff"? Have you had it calibrated?

FYI, using a torque wrench to loosen stuff is a good way to throw off the calibration.

frozenphil
Mar 13, 2003

YOU CANNOT MAKE A MISTAKE SO BIG THAT 80 GRIT CAN'T FIX IT!


RealKyleH posted:

As someone who imports Chinese stuff be careful with confusing the idea that a clone is made by the same manufacturer.

Just gonna bring out this oldie but a goodie for this post here.

frozenphil
Mar 13, 2003

YOU CANNOT MAKE A MISTAKE SO BIG THAT 80 GRIT CAN'T FIX IT!


BigKOfJustice posted:

Absolutely happy with the Milwaukee, I picked up a wire brush for it Yesterday.

Speaking of which, time to make my rear end down to the shop.

Do yourself a favor and pick up some Nylox wheel/cup brushes if you are going to be using a wire wheel/cup for any amount of time or regularity. You'll thank me after you spend a few hours using them and don't have to pick any shrapnel out of your hands and arms.

frozenphil
Mar 13, 2003

YOU CANNOT MAKE A MISTAKE SO BIG THAT 80 GRIT CAN'T FIX IT!


Blocko posted:

There is usually a tap on the bottom of the tank, unscrew it (make sure all the air is out first) and see if any water comes out. You don't want water to come out (especially if it's rust coloured.)

You don't want a lot of water to come out or rust colored water to come out of it. There's no way you're going to find one with no water in it as water in the tank is the nature of the beast when compressing air.

frozenphil
Mar 13, 2003

YOU CANNOT MAKE A MISTAKE SO BIG THAT 80 GRIT CAN'T FIX IT!


Lowclock posted:

I pulled the drain plug on one of my compressors after not draining it for like 6 years and nothing came out. No water, oil, rust, anything. It wasn't plugged or anything either. I stuck a piece of wire in there and it went right in and then I turned the compressor on and just air came out. This is on a lovely little 20gal Harbor-Freightish brand, oiled.

Do you live in the desert? Have you ever used your compressor? Do you have a dryer hooked up in line?

frozenphil
Mar 13, 2003

YOU CANNOT MAKE A MISTAKE SO BIG THAT 80 GRIT CAN'T FIX IT!


Rhyno posted:

I picked up a 5 piece front end service kit from HF today and I saw this in the new ad,
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ct...97503&Submit=Go

Would anyone recommend this as a starter welder? I have a few small holes in the floorboards of my Escort that will need fixing, would this handle that job?

You do not buy complicated machines, electronic stuff, or safety equipment from Harbor Freight. Harbor Freight is to be used for simple machines and hand tools only. This is a rule you should follow if you value your time, money, and/or life.

frozenphil
Mar 13, 2003

YOU CANNOT MAKE A MISTAKE SO BIG THAT 80 GRIT CAN'T FIX IT!


Slung Blade posted:

I've got the same brand (well, same company basically) as RealKyleH, but mine isn't as nice or as full featured as his.

I've only used mine for arc welding, but I've been really happy with it.

It's not great to learn with, but once I took a course and figured out what the gently caress I was supposed to do, it's pretty good.

I'd rather have a better name brand welder too, but honestly, a plasma cutter, TIG, and arc machine all in one for 700 bucks is pretty loving enticing.

Which type of arc welding? Arc welding encompasses Stick, MIG, and TIG welding.

frozenphil
Mar 13, 2003

YOU CANNOT MAKE A MISTAKE SO BIG THAT 80 GRIT CAN'T FIX IT!


Any recommendations on a strut tower engine brace? What I'm looking for is a bar that goes across the engine and rests on the strut towers/pinch welds on the fenders for supporting the engine while doing suspension work. I can't think of the proper name so I'm failing at google right now.

Edit: Found the name. Apparently they are called engine hangers and look like the one below, only not so home made and scary looking. Any brands better than the others or any to avoid?

frozenphil fucked around with this message at 15:18 on Jan 6, 2010

frozenphil
Mar 13, 2003

YOU CANNOT MAKE A MISTAKE SO BIG THAT 80 GRIT CAN'T FIX IT!


Wagonburner posted:

home-made and scary looking indeed. no thereifixedit.com watermark, where'd you find that?

weak looking pipe you make a fence or patio umbrella out of, weak looking brackets, dog-chain, tiny little wood screws.

The wood blocks themselves are about the only thing that could've been strong about that whole rig.

I believe it's the first GIS for "engine hanger", although many import folks seem to call engine mounts engine hangers as well.

frozenphil
Mar 13, 2003

YOU CANNOT MAKE A MISTAKE SO BIG THAT 80 GRIT CAN'T FIX IT!


Doctor Zero posted:

I got the cordless impact wrench and it's been great for the last 9 months or so. Seems I may be lucky though.

Of course there are exceptions to the rule, but in general you don't buy that kind of stuff from Harbor Freight.

frozenphil
Mar 13, 2003

YOU CANNOT MAKE A MISTAKE SO BIG THAT 80 GRIT CAN'T FIX IT!


InitialDave posted:

I can't really see anything wrong with that. Should be plenty strong enough to support the engine. Why pay for one when you only need it for one job?
Because I don't like to purchase disposable tools and I may want it for more than one job or sell it along if I decide I don't?

Slung Blade posted:

So it takes longer, this is frozenphil

Your mother used to kiss you goodnight after giving your father a blowjob. FYI.

frozenphil
Mar 13, 2003

YOU CANNOT MAKE A MISTAKE SO BIG THAT 80 GRIT CAN'T FIX IT!


Timeserts are another way to go if you don't want to ever do the job again. Those bastards are never letting go.

frozenphil
Mar 13, 2003

YOU CANNOT MAKE A MISTAKE SO BIG THAT 80 GRIT CAN'T FIX IT!


ab0z posted:

This is how I started building my tool collection. If I'm going to work on your car, I need to have service literature and correct tools. If I don't have one or more of those things, guess who's buying it? I'll give you a hint, it's not me. Labor pricing is case of beer times how much of a bitch I think the job will be.

I paid two fifths of some cheap Canadian whiskey to get my car primered. Ended up doing a lot of it myself as my "help" was hammered on liquor and paint fumes.

frozenphil
Mar 13, 2003

YOU CANNOT MAKE A MISTAKE SO BIG THAT 80 GRIT CAN'T FIX IT!


mod sassinator posted:

Not sure the best place to post this but there's a good deal on K&N oil filters at Amazon. From Fatwallet http://www.fatwallet.com/forums/hot-deals/987752/ you can find the oil filters for ~$10 each plus buy 3 and get $5 off. In most auto part stores these are $15+ filters, but in my experience worth the extra money for cars you care about. I just bought 6 of them and should be stocked up for a few years of oil changes.

What is your experience with K&N oil filters that leads you to believe they are better than other, cheaper, oil filter?

frozenphil
Mar 13, 2003

YOU CANNOT MAKE A MISTAKE SO BIG THAT 80 GRIT CAN'T FIX IT!


Petit.Conan posted:

That nut is pretty awesome, but I got a case (12) of carquest filters for my truck for the same price as I usually got 2 K&N oil filters.

But on that note, are Carquest filters any good? My basic knowledge of oil filters is FRAM=BAD.

They are WIX filters, so they are fine. Note: the admonition of this filter in the link is for that specific application. Whether or not the Carquest filter is good depends on the design of your application's housing.

And in general, this is all you need to know about oil filters. It was last updated in 2008, but oil filters aren't exactly a rapidly evolving technology.

frozenphil
Mar 13, 2003

YOU CANNOT MAKE A MISTAKE SO BIG THAT 80 GRIT CAN'T FIX IT!


RealKyleH posted:

I could see that intention but what I'm saying is why is a punch meant to go inside a .125 hole, so freaking close to .125? Why isn't it .120 or less?

This right here is why no machinist has ever truly pleasured a woman.

frozenphil
Mar 13, 2003

YOU CANNOT MAKE A MISTAKE SO BIG THAT 80 GRIT CAN'T FIX IT!


dv6speed posted:

And yes, I've been shocked with that 400 amps before on a hot sweaty day due to my own stupidity. It knocked me back about 4 feet.

I watched a guy get a hold of the supply line for this eight pack (8 300 amp welders in one box with a single 250hp diesel running them) when he was looking for the dipstick. It was hilarious. It's the big blue box next to the Z.

frozenphil
Mar 13, 2003

YOU CANNOT MAKE A MISTAKE SO BIG THAT 80 GRIT CAN'T FIX IT!


oxbrain posted:

I can use my sawzall on the end of a 100' extension cord.

We have an extension cord at the shop for 3 phase 220v stuff. It's hilariously huge, but that's what it takes to go 50' with that stuff.

frozenphil
Mar 13, 2003

YOU CANNOT MAKE A MISTAKE SO BIG THAT 80 GRIT CAN'T FIX IT!


Black88GTA posted:

Any recs?

Maybe shoot these guys an email and ask them for some tips? They do awesome work and support the Mustang community a bunch.

http://www.mirrorfinishpolishing.com/

This is all polish, no chrome:

frozenphil
Mar 13, 2003

YOU CANNOT MAKE A MISTAKE SO BIG THAT 80 GRIT CAN'T FIX IT!


Aceshighxxx posted:

That 1/2" breaker works great for just about everything, but it's juuuust barely too small for really stubborn axle nuts. I use it anyway since I'm too cheap to get a 3/4", and it gets kind of scary putting your whole body weight on the 1/2" and watching the gap where the swivel is attached open up almost half an inch.

Get a cheap torque multiplier and never worry about anything being too tight again.

This one outputs up to 1000lb-ft with a 1/2" wrench.

frozenphil
Mar 13, 2003

YOU CANNOT MAKE A MISTAKE SO BIG THAT 80 GRIT CAN'T FIX IT!


IOwnCalculus posted:

Yeah but doesn't that multiplier only work on things like lugnuts? Useless if you can't anchor it somehow.

That one requires an anchor, but they make ones that don't. They're just a simple gear reduction drive. The only problem with them is they tend to get expensive, fast.

frozenphil
Mar 13, 2003

YOU CANNOT MAKE A MISTAKE SO BIG THAT 80 GRIT CAN'T FIX IT!


RealKyleH posted:

drat just looked at them and they started at around $180 on ebay and were all 1/2" input to 3/4" output with one from northern tool at $203. I cant see why theyre so expensive though, is it just a planetary gearset?

Pretty much, yeah (link has exploded diagrams). There are definitely cheaper ways to remove an axle nut, but if you happen to have access to a torque multiplier they are the best way to do it. I got to play with this bigass 4 stage multiplier at the shop. I used a standard 1/2" ratchet and one hand to break a 1" bolt loose that had been tack welded on 4 sides to a nut that was welded to a plate. It ruled.

frozenphil
Mar 13, 2003

YOU CANNOT MAKE A MISTAKE SO BIG THAT 80 GRIT CAN'T FIX IT!


Cat Hatter posted:

Has anyone ever used a Thru-Ratchet? I was given some crazy Kobalt 110 piece set that goes up to 1.25 inch sockets but I'm not sold on the design. I'm strongly considering returning it and getting something more like a Gear Wrench for even tighter spaces. Thoughts?

They work fine as long as you don't put much torque on them. Real handy for putting a nut on a really long bolt like you'd find working on a deck or something.

frozenphil
Mar 13, 2003

YOU CANNOT MAKE A MISTAKE SO BIG THAT 80 GRIT CAN'T FIX IT!


ab0z posted:

I accidentally bought this on my lunch break. 20% off coupon = $175, and I also had one of those free flashlight coupons!

So jealous. I really could have used one while doing the body work and such on my Mustang. Naturally, the shop went and bought one the day after my car came back from paint and I moved it to a different garage to finish it.

frozenphil
Mar 13, 2003

YOU CANNOT MAKE A MISTAKE SO BIG THAT 80 GRIT CAN'T FIX IT!


Licoln or Miller. Don't bother with anything else.

Something like this from Lincoln or this from Miller will do everything you want. I like Miller, but preference really is just personal opinion at this level; like Ford or Chevy.

frozenphil fucked around with this message at 20:03 on Mar 19, 2010

frozenphil
Mar 13, 2003

YOU CANNOT MAKE A MISTAKE SO BIG THAT 80 GRIT CAN'T FIX IT!


blindjoe posted:

http://www.weldingmart.com/item/Mil...V_60HZ_1PH/2281

Just something like that? Is there a harbor freight for welders? Here in canada we have KMS and Princess auto, plus the welding stores. I guess the next step is go into the welding stores and see if they will give me a deal.

Yeah, I actually edited my post above with that welder. It's a drat good piece that will do whatever you're willing to tackle in your garage.

Harbor Freight welders work, but not well. Check out their duty cycle; most are like 10% or something absurd. That means you can only use them for 2 minutes out of every 10.

frozenphil fucked around with this message at 20:08 on Mar 19, 2010

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frozenphil
Mar 13, 2003

YOU CANNOT MAKE A MISTAKE SO BIG THAT 80 GRIT CAN'T FIX IT!


You ever see an idea and go, "Why the gently caress did I not think of that"?

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