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sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



Fallen Rib

RealKyleH posted:

I bought mine but haven't assembled it yet. It was on sale for $199 then I got 20% off that. Hell of a deal. Got it, tape, two blades for it, and a soda for less than $200 after tax

and I finally got my 50' retractable air hose reel. I swear its made in the same factory where they make coxreels, just with the rejected pieces. The only thing I noticed that could become an issue is that the axle doesn't have a stop on one end, but it seems solid enough. It was $79.99, minus 20%.

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sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



Fallen Rib

ease posted:

I'm thinking of buying this arc welder :



Guy wants 100$ for it, and I have a 220 line already hooked up in my garage so I'm good to go.

I've only welded with a mig before, and created some pretty lovely welds at that. I figure I can get this and practice welding with it. One thing I'm concerned with is blowing holes threw thin metal which I hear is a concern with an arc welder. I know I'm going to have to learn with experience on this specific machine when it comes to that.

So obviously, I shouldn't be able to weld things like exhausts? How about things like a 4 wheeler frame? Still too thin of steel? If I gently caress something up, is it pretty easy for a good welder with a mig to fix? I have access to that.

Overkill for exhausts, you'll probably burn through. Its meant for thick plate, so its perfect for a frame. You could get a cheap MIG for exhausts, its much nicer anyhow. No long electrode to deal with, and MIG has a nice gun that you can stick onto the exhaust, and just close your eyes and hit the trigger to tack it up. Then you take it off, and MIG it right.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



Fallen Rib

hippynerd posted:

DUDE! This is really a big mistake. I've met folks that have done that, and hours later they feel the effects (they usually wake up in the middle of the night screeming).

I hear it feels like getting hit in the face with a sand bag.

Gas welding goggles are great for gas welding, but you need like 11's for arc welding, and since you cant see anything with 11's, you dont want goggles for arc welding.

I use an old lincoln like that, its pretty old and funky, but it welds poo poo right up. If you want to weld thinner material, you just need to get thinner rods and lower the current.

If you want to weld cast iron, you will need special rods, and its a little harder to weld, but you can do it. I did some exhaust manifolds this year, and it was kinda cool.

If you havnt already, you should invest in a good set of thick leather welders gloves (they cover your whole arm), and maybe some knee pads.

Stick welding is a bit difficult to learn, but it does get the job done.
You need Shade 10 for TIG and Stick, but you can get away with 9's if you aren't doing it for hours and hours. That said, I use 10's.

Buy good gloves, and a good welders cap. Tillman makes great gloves.
Find your LWS (local welding supply) company. Treat them well, and they'll return the favor.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



Fallen Rib

oxbrain posted:

I had an ancient grease gun that was hand filled. It worked like a champ, until I left it in a wet toolbox and the pump rusted solid. I replaced it with a HF gun, which leaked at the piston and made a horrible mess when I went to uncock it. I replaced that with a lincoln, which uncocks itself if you breathe on it. Both of those are now returned.

I'm considering just buying this and leaving it in a big ziploc.

Put a whip hose on it, and stick a rubber glove over the tip. The glove keeps the grease mess contained to the hose only, not the entire gun.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



Fallen Rib

I finally bit the bullet, and gave up on being frustrated on Craigslist looking for a compressor. I've tried to get 10 compressors off CL in the past 1.5 years, and haven't gotten one. Either 5 mins too late, like the 240v 3hp 60G quincy that went for $200 last week, or the compressor was crap, like the Eaton I got info about today, and pictures (rusted tank, leaking oil from the head, encrusted in an inch of paint...)

SO, I bit the bullet, and bought the clearance Campbell Hausfeld 80 Gallon, 5HP 240v compressor from Lowes. Originally $899, marked down to $599. Its way bigger than I need right now, but thats what AI is all about.

I'll get pics, but in the meantime: http://www.cpocampbellhausfeld.com/...ion/xp5810.html

Its loving huge, about 6 feet tall. I "walked" the pallet it was on down my ramps from the bed of the truck, and got it into the garage. I've got to clean off a spot, and wire up a 60A breaker and disconnect switch for it. It only needs 35A, but I'm probably getting a welder soon, and that'll need 60A service. I also got a cull cut of 6-3 w/ ground for 25% off, and its long enough to get where I need it. All told, the bill was $700, and I still need a regulator/filter, and a couple of small lubricators, and a lot of copper pipe to run the air lines.

Anyone have a good source for a regulator? I need one that'll handle 175psi.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



Fallen Rib

trouser chili posted:

What do you guys think about this guy? I'm pretty hot on it to replace my HF 8 gallon that randomly stops working until I hit it with a hammer.




Ditch it. Its only 1.6 HP, look at the CFM specs. My 1.6HP oilless direct drive Craftsman that I'm selling makes 4.9CFM@90psi.

Do what I did, and buy a good compressor. The one I bought is a great deal, 240v, 35A, 14.6CFM@90psi, and $599.
Just because it looks the same means nothing. Motors of the same framesize can range from 1hp to 7.5hp. Same size base, same size cover, different motor.

BigKOfJustice posted:

Anyone mess with any of the discharge/charging tools for HVAC service?

I have a leaking high pressure A/C line, which I have known about for a few months but now I'm running low on R134, and I'd like to discharge the system safely, then replace the hose assembly myself, then take it to a dealer or shop to recharge with new refrigerant. My truck takes about 3-4 lbs.

Basically I'd be happy to do the RnR work myself, and let someone else handle the recharge.

Any suggestions?

I'll probably need a new dryer and a set of manifold guages.. but what else?

There's a great thread on Honda-Tech about A/C work. You'll need a vacuum pump, a new receiver/dryer, the correct refrigerant/oil, and a good set of gauges.

sharkytm fucked around with this message at 18:13 on Feb 23, 2009

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



Fallen Rib

trouser chili posted:

Well, I'm trying to buy a good compressor. But I need portability, and that means the ability to run 120v. I can put 240v in the garage, so if it switches that's great, but the numbers on that unit seem pretty good compared to what's available in portable units for the price. Additionally, it's seperate pump and motor, which means I can always bolt a more powerful motor in it's place. DeWalt makes the D55168 which compares to the unit I've posted, but it's oiless and I'm not sure why I'd want to spend more on it.

You won't be able to bolt up a more powerful motor without probably pushing the compressor out of efficiency. If you need 120V, you are stuck with low-power units. I'd save your money, buy a Craftsman oilless that puts out 4.9SCFM@90posi for $175 or less on CL. You aren't gaining much by spending $500 on that Kobalt, other than the capability to run it on 240v at half the amps. Its not like if you run it on 240v, you'll get 2x the HP, or 2x the airflow. Thats the way the cookie crumbles, unluckily. If you were closer, I'd sell you my Craftsman for $125.

The only advantage that Kobalt has for it is that its going to be quieter, and last longer than a direct-drive oilless unit. It doesn't put out any more air, it doesn't draw fewer amps, it costs a lot more, and you can technically run it on 240v, but you'd have to swap lugs and plugs for it to do so gracefully, and it doesn't even gain you anything.

You are in the same boat that I am. Instead, I bought a small nailgun compressor for house-fixing tasks, and a monster 80G 240V compressor for the garage and shop. I'm not trying to be elitist here, just hoping to save you the cost and headache of a pricey compressor that doesn't perform like it should.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



Fallen Rib

EnergizerFellow posted:

I went looking into 120V portables a while back and the Makita MAC2400 looks to be the best out there. Tank volume may be a bit low for what you need, so do double-check that. Street price is around $320.

http://www.amazon.com/Makita-MAC240...r/dp/B0001Q2VPK

Thats one of the best nailgun compressors out there for sure. I don't know how it'll handle automotive duties though. Small tanks make it very portable, but not a lot of "staying power". TC, tell us exactly what you'll be doing, and we can come up with a better option.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



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fatman1683 posted:

Maybe it's just me, but I don't have a lot of confidence in house-brand shop equipment from places like Home Depot or Lowe's. For cheap hand tools I'm sure they're fine, but for something like an upright compressor I'd rather have an I-R or Speedaire.

You can get a very nice I-R compressor for roundabout $700 that will probably outlive your children. I'd be surprised if that Husky outlived your cat.

vvv CH makes most of the common-brand air products in the US, so that's neither here nor there. Honestly if you want an inexpensive compressor, I wouldn't spring for the big upright. I'd get a smaller horizontal compressor, one that will fulfill your current needs and not go much over that gift certificate. That way you can put back some scratch toward a nice upright that'll last forever.
IRs are very nice, but they are very expensive. A comparable 80gallon, 5hp model from IR (compared to my CH) was $1300. Check http://www.tractorsupply.com/ sku# 3496129. There's a 60 gallon, sku# 3496111 for $599. Its similar to that Husky, which I can't find on home depot's site, so I can't see the price. If its close, I'd get the IR from TSC.

Wagonburner posted:

I've been looking off and on on craigslist for a compressor, I'm wanting the most powerful 30ish gallon 120v one I can find.

I saw one last week called a campbell hausfeld cast iron series, something like 5hp 80 gallon and they only wanted $200 for it (it was a lady selling it).

I didn't have the money and I really wanted something smaller and 120v so I can take it places but now that I see some of these prices I'm really wishing I pawned something or did a credit card cash advance to get it. listing is gone of course.
If you are in the Northeast, I've got a 26G craftsman I'll sell for cheap. Need the space for my new 80G.

RealKyleH posted:

Set up an RSS feed for anything you want on craigslist.
And use CraigsHepler.

trouser chili posted:

Mostly garage work. I pulled the motor with the old tank, running impacts, air ratchets here and there. Air hammers/chisels. I'd like to strip the bed of the truck and repaint it. I'd like to cut out my rockers to weld new-ones in. Things like that. Occasionally I'd take it out with me to do other work like sandblasting or chiseling concrete. I'll probably be using it to chisel the concrete off the posts of my old fence when I dig it out this summer.
Honestly man, I'd get a 240v two-stage. It'll be quieter, and last forever. You can make a 240v extension cord if you want to move it, or just get a long air hose. If you don't need to move it around from place to place, a stationary is the way to go.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



Fallen Rib

944 posted:

Also, you WON'T be sandblasting with any 120v compressor. Unless you are sandblasting with a detail gun.

This is entirely untrue. My 33 Gallon 150psi compressor would let me blast for about 5 minutes with my crappy siphon sandblaster before it started getting hot and moist. I'd let it cool for about 10, then get another 5 mins of blasting. It was enough for me to do furniture, and small projects. 5 Mins of blasting is a long time for something small. Now, I'd agree that if you wanted to run a big sandblaster for large projects, you don't want a recreational 120v compressor.

daslog posted:

what makes it better than the Campbell Hausfeld compressors?
Better grade pumps with better valves and seals so they pump more air/revolution, and possibly a little better electric motors that are wound better and have better armatures, so they lose less power as heat.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



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Wagonburner posted:

If you have an unused 220v outlet you can make or buy an adapter to plug 120 stuff in. That's what I'm going to do if I end up with a 120 compressor

If the breaker is the same size as your 120v outlet, you are still going to pop it. The best option is to install a bigger breaker. Hell, wire it with 10-3 wg and stick a 30A breaker on it. Then you can run a compressor and whatever you want on it.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



Fallen Rib

atomicfire posted:

Here's some more juicy morsels I dug up on compressors.

Larger more "expensive" compressors are also two stage. They also have a larger, more powerful motor. They might even have a magnetic starter on them. If you're really splurging, they'll even have their very own intercooler. What does this mean?

Two stage compressors compress the air in two stages. Whats that do? It makes the contraption quieter, since you can spin the compressor at a slower speed to get the same airflow and pressure out of them. It also means you can get higher pressures without overloading your motor. Larger motors allow you pressurize the tank faster and can potentially pump the tank to a higher pressure. Different starters like capacitive and magnetic starters prevent the problem I have - massive current draw during motor startup. Usually, the current draw on my 110v compressor is so large that the power line can't handle the load, the voltage dips, the motor binds, my lights dim, then after a second or so the breaker pops. This is bad, mkay? Different starters give the motor a square kick in the rear end without overloading the power source to quickly and quietly start the motor. Intercoolers dry and cool the air before they're pumped into the tank. This gives you drier air, with less moisture which will keep your tools happy, your tank dry, and other loving happy poo poo I don't feel like typing.

Oh, expensive compressors also might have larger manifolds too, which will translate to less pressure drop when you are operating your tools. If you use it as a shop air source, you can power more at once with the compressor if you have a larger manifold. Think of it as the exhaust system on a turbo car. You want to free it up.

My lovely 1/4 inch manifold will make the pressure drop to an indicated 40PSI even though the regulator is set for 90PSI.

Good info. My CH output is 1/2" NPT. Plenty of air...

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



Fallen Rib

RealKyleH posted:


Ratchets - Get craftsman either used or on eBay, soak in ATF. They are easy to rebuild and cheap.


I don't have anything to add except to disagree with this single statement. Craftsman ratchets used to be decent, but the new ones use plastic selector levers, and honestly, the 3/8" ratchet will be the tool you use in 90% of jobs. Buy an S-K, Matco, Mac, or Cornwell. Check eBay for those. Even used, they are pro-level tools that will hold up WAY better than any crappy cheap Craftsman. Cornwell still only, to my knowledge, makes a 36-tooth ratchet. Thats pretty rough, and means a large swing arc. If you look for an S-K thats modern, they are 72-tooth heads, and offer a very small swing arc. I'd suggest a model#:45175. Its a round-head, 72-tooth, and strong as hell. I've beaten mine with a 5# sledge before, and when I disassembled it recently, it was 100% fine. You can also put some Lucas Oil Stabilizer in a cheap ratchet (you have to add it with a Q-tip, soaking won't get it in there), and it will quiet it down, and make it very very slick.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



Fallen Rib

Any good, pro-quality ratchet it worth owning. I own 4 S-K's, all 3/8" and between 8 and 10 inches. I own a single 36T 3/8" Cornwell thats 14" long. That covers 95% of my work on cars. My OLD Craftsmen with the metal levers handle the 1/4 and 1/2 duties.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



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Keep some extras, try to trade the rest on GarageJournal. Lots of SAE-wanters.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

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Its a great little set, perfect for stashing in the ditch bag, or taking on a road trip in a crappy car. The ratchet isn't anything to write home about, but it'll do in a pinch. I bought 2 this morning.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



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rockcity posted:

What's the general consensus on the best floor jack for under $100? I don't need it to be lightweight or anything, I just need it to work. I bought a cheap kit with a compact jack and two stands from Northern Tool a few months ago and I've used it a grand total of 4 times now and after the third use it's basically done for. Won't hold any hydraulic pressure and I have to pump like crazy to get it to lift the car and then rush to get the stand under there. The pressure release is tightened all the way so that's definitely not the issue. I wouldn't mind something that has a lift greater than 14 or so inches either. I think my current one is 14 3/8 and that's barely enough to get it on the jack stands and the tires are almost touching the ground at the height which makes rotating tires difficult with little clearance.

I figure I'll probably just get a new jack with a higher lift and another set of jack stands to make things easier on me. Any suggestions for a decent, but not expensive jack? I like the aluminum HF one, but that lift height is about the same as what I already own.
Northern just sells chinese crap like HF, but they charge way more. gently caress them.
I've got the HF AL jack, and its been an awesome little jack. If you need more height, I just use a lifting block (a piece of 4x4 that I stick on top of the jack). Jack up, insert stand, jack down, insert block, jack up, readjust stand. Repeat as needed.

If you need a higher lift, HF has their 3-ton jack. That will hit 20", but only goes down to 5.5". I really don't know what to suggest about jackstands. Craftsman and HF's are chinese, and not particularly good anymore. I've got an old US-made pair and a newer smaller Chinese pair. Neither has given me any trouble.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

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Paging the Hummer H1 guy to this thread...
I've seen enough failed jackstands to make me wary.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

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Kynetx posted:

I just installed one of these and I'm a little confused as to what conditions would activate it. Also, assuming that it's purging out the condensate can I just leave the tank charged up?

Whenever your compressor hits the set pressure (when it stops running), it send a pules of air through a piece of tubing, and that discharges the air in the line to make the motor start easier. When that happens, if you have the HF Autodrain hooked up correctly, it will sense the pulse of air, and drain the tank for a second or so. It'll do it when the motor fires, and when it stops.

http://www.paragoncode.com/shop/compressor/
Read here.

sharkytm fucked around with this message at 00:35 on Mar 17, 2009

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



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Kynetx posted:

If memory serves, the barcode is specific to each customer, kinda like the email coupons.

Nope. Its certainly not. The barcode only has like 9 spots for numbers on it, and most of those are dedicated for making it a coupon. I know, because I get 2 catalogs, one at work under my boss' name, and one at home under my name. Same number and code. Thats why there's your personal info on the coupon, so they can track usage. I always just copy the coupon and white out the personal info before I copy it. No one has ever bitched.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



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I've gotten tools fro HF within a week, but usually, its more like 10 days.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



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Korwen posted:

I picked up the compressor today. It works, but it's not in the greatest of condition. It's been used, a lot.

There's some peeling of the paint and slight surface rust. The filter screen has cracked off, so I'm going to have to figure out some way to get one on there. I am going to sand off the surface rust and respray part of it. It'll look ghetto as gently caress unless I do the whole tank, which I might eventually do. I drained the tank and very little liquid came out, however. Is this dangerous? Is it a deal breaker? With another $20 or so I can get it back to very workable condition, I just want to make sure it's safe.

So now I have something to work on in the meantime.

I'd pop an inspection plug and check out the inside of the bottom of the tank. You can also remove the drainplug and see if its covered in rusty crap. If it is, then the tank is rusty, and you'll be guessing at how badly until you get it checked with a thickness gauge, or just get a new tank and transplant the compressor motor and whatnot.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

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Drunk Pledge Driver posted:

I got a Harbor Freight flyer with a coupon for $160 off 499.99 for this roller chest. If I can find a 20% off coupon to use along with it this weekend, I think I'll pick it up.

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ct...temnumber=90320

Don't expect that to work. The 20% off coupon says its not applicable with any other coupon, the computer automatically deletes it once you shoot another coupon.
Nonetheless, 20% off 399.99 is amazing.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

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Walked posted:

Are the harbor freight MIG welders worth my time? I am closing on a house (with garage! ) here at the end of the month, and god drat if I dont want a welder to gently caress around with.

I'll be pretty broke though, furnishing a house coming from a condo and whatnot, so its either cheap MIG from HF now, or wait a while and get something quality.
Wait and get something better. I've used 3 HF MIGs, and only one of them was remotely capable of laying a decent bead. I have the HF TIG, and its usable, but very limited in capability due to the lack of HF start (its scratch start only).

You can get a pretty decent used Miller 110v unit for around $400 OR a new Hobart for the same money (and hobart is owned and MFRd by Miller, just overseas), and since you'll own the garage, you can wire in 220v, and step up to a larger unit for another hundred or so.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



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Dyscrasia posted:

What about regular socket wrenches? Is Proto a good brand for them? My Craftsman socket wrench is already on its way out and Ive got a lot of work to do on my car this summer..

You mean ratchets?
Proto, S-K, Cornwell, and of course the major tool truck brands (snapon, Mac, Matco, etc) will all hold up very well. Just remember to disassemble them once in a while and clean/lube them up. I use Lucas Oil Stabilizer to lube, it makes them nearly noiseless, and very smooth.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

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Walked posted:



This is why I asked though. Guess I'll keep an eye on craigslist for a while, $500 isnt too bad if I can find one.

http://store.cyberweld.com/hobmigwel.html
Brand-y new 115v unit for $529, you'd need a gas cylinder and a regulator though.

You should definitely look in the used market. There are a lot of quality machines out there for reasonable money.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

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Ethyx posted:

Next, I bought an S-K ratchet set hoping for better quality, but I was still disappointed. One ratchet was broken out of the box, and the other two needed adjustment. The S-Ks are designed so that the entire ratchet mechanism is held together by a single screw which must be tightened perfectly or the tool will not work. This seems like a terrible design which will need constant adjustment, so I sent them back.

Um, you must have either A) gotten a completely hosed up set, or B) cranked down on the allen-head screw and thought that was OK, because I've got 4 S-K ratchets that have been used on pretty much every job I've done over the past 5 years, and I've yet to TOUCH the screw, except when I disassemble them for cleaning/lubing. I just tension it so the ratchet works, and don't gently caress with it again. The oldest S-K I have is from circa 1965, and has lived a rough life. Its still tight, and has only limited wear on the pawls. I have a rebuild kit for it, but haven't needed it yet.

On the other hand, I can't stand ratchets that use a circlip or retaining clip to hold the guts together, because as the backing plate wears (and they do), you can't tighten up the action. Snap-On uses 2 screws, which is nice, but you still can't really tighten up the action when they start to get loose, plus the threads are pretty small, and I know at least a few people who have had them strip or break off in the ratchet head.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

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PainterofCrap posted:

I'm looking for a recommendation for an air impact wrench. Air supply is not an issue (see my compressor on page 8); the C-H gun I bought years ago never seems to supply more than about 20-lbs of torque on the highest setting & can't loosen a lug nut for poo poo. I have ruled out a kinked hose & am running 125-psi through. It annoyed me as I'm rebuilding brakes on my Bonneville today.

I got the 1/2" Earthquake from HF, on sale for $80, and a 20% off coupon. It is heavy as gently caress, but throws some serious torque. Once I get my big compressor fired up correctly, I'm going to love using it.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

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Mooecow posted:

You're right. My guess was a bit too high. According to this chart that it only weights 630 lbs.

Then get a stand thats rated to 1000# at least. First of all, HF's stuff is only so-so quality to begin with, and 630+you pushing down on a ratchet to tighten a crank bolt could easily add another 70 lbs.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

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I use an XYTronics.
http://www.circuitspecialists.com/prod.itml/icOid/7760

Works awesome, and with different tips, I can do big stuff or minute SMD rework.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

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944 posted:

I heard they used to be Snap On, and now they are Mac (re branded stuff). Anyone know if that's actually the case?

Its not important. Proto makes stuff in the US, and its great quality. If all you are doing is swapping wheels and tires, a HF torque wrench is fine. If you are rebuilding an engine, buy something decent. No point saving $50 on a torque wrench, and blowing $500 on a main bearing failing.

I've got 2 craftsman torque wrenches, a Utica, and an S-K. All are pretty accurate, based off of one another. I've got my name on a Proto thats for sale locally, its nice to have an all-metal TW.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

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RealKyleH posted:

The picture above is not representative of the type of quality you get with Chinese turbos and I don't even sell Chinese turbos.

Completely true. That picture was a display model that was accidentally sent to someone. It was never supposed to be used, and even if the reseller sent it on purpose, XSPower turbos actually aren't THAT bad. They just need a rebuild and some cleaning up on the bearing surfaces, and they are a 1/3 cost turbo compared to a Garrett or T-netics.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

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Nerobro posted:

I picked up a Brute 10gallon compressor tonight. $114 out the door at Home Depot, with an accessory kit, and extra QD. For all of my paintball stuff I use the female connectors on the hoses. Is there a standard? Is it all female going towards the air source?
Female ends should be on the source, so when you unplug a hose, the tank doesn't drain through the male fitting.


And FYI: Your paintball gun needs upwards of 2000psi, nothing that your home compressor can put out. I figure you know that, but just checkin'.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

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BigKOfJustice posted:





Hell yes. 4.5" grinder, 12 amps, with bag, 5 year warranty, 2 grinding disks included.

I picked up a Dewalt originally, but the loving shank off the motor was too short for any of the sanding pads mounts carried by home depot, including the dewalt branded pads Ryobi, Milwaukee, Rigid, and all the other brands hand longer attachment shafts.

Ah well, I got a powerful unit with more stuff for slightly more money.

Rust can't hide from me no longer.



It's therapeutic.
The DeWalt has a removable threaded spacer that makes it so you can hold cutting wheels. Its usually installed by default on all grinders, so you don't lose it. Nonetheless, the Milwaukee is a nice grinder. I'm a Metabo fan myself.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



Fallen Rib

ease posted:

not as heavy as you'd think. probably somewhere around 175lbs maybe a bit more. just awkward to lift

My 80G/5hp is over 300#. I used ramps and 2 people, and walked it to its final spot on the pallet.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



Fallen Rib

I've done literally hundreds, if not a thousand crimps with the HF tool on various boats. It works as well or better than anything I've found. The only issue is that it doesn't come with the other dies. There's a set on Amazon that does:
http://www.amazon.com/Tool-Aid-1892...17&sr=8-1-spell

Pretty drat good deal if you have to do thicker wire, use uninsulated crimps, or use micro-crimps.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



Fallen Rib

RealKyleH posted:

The big red toolbox at HF is higher quality than your entry level craftsman box. Ive never understood why people get super expensive tool boxes though.

I have a Husky one that I bought used in great shape of Craigslist thats a step up from both of those. Id say its comparable to the kennedy chests they had at machinist school in terms of roller smoothness though neither were loaded up with air tools and hammers or anything

EDIT: Now I really wanna try a drill doctor I cant even remember if it was a real one or a knockoff that sucked.
I love my HF 42" box... got it on sale, plus a coupon, for like $350. Awesome box, although the included liners were more of a "quiet" thing, and less of a "nonskid" thing.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



Fallen Rib

Beam-deflection torque wrenches are great, but they are a pain in the rear end to use in a lot of places. I use on one lug nuts and axle nuts, but aside from that, its clickers all the way.

I'd spend the $$ on an SK Torque wrench. Unless they've changed policies, they'll re-cal it for free if you send it to them. You might have to pay return shipping, but thats a darn good deal.

You can also check the calibration by using a deflection wrench and a clicker on 2 nuts welded together. Set the clicker for 30, and watch the beam. When it clicks, you'll get an idea of how accurate it is.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



Fallen Rib

Jared592 posted:

I've got something like this cheapy and it's fine for chasing threads:
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ct...temnumber=45766

I'd get one of the titanium nitride kits if I was making new threads.

DO NOT BUY HF TAPS OR DIES. Dear god, they suck worse than anything I've ever used for tapping. Spend the cash, and get some decent taps. The correct drill bit, good cutting fluid, and a good tap will make you wonder why you ever tried with anything else. Heck, even Vermont American taps from the hardware store are acceptable, but NOT the HF stuff. Their old tap sets used to even say "Not for use in metal, use in plastic only."

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sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



Fallen Rib

laymil posted:

THEY WORK PERFECTLY FINE FOR CHASING THREADS THAT ALREADY EXIST. See, I can type in caps too. They are threaded and spaced correctly and are cheaper than anything else on the market. I can't comment on their more expensive tap and die sets, but I have had absolutely no trouble with the cheapo 60 piece set.

I've had cheap taps snap off when trying to chase rusty threads. G'head, use them, I was just trying to warn the unwary away from them. They aren't spaced particularly well, and the metal they use tends to seize in stainless and in steel.

For aluminum or plastic, they'll do.

Then come in here and bitch that you have a broken tap stuck in something, how to you go about removing that...

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