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Chillbro Baggins
Oct 8, 2004
Bad Angus! Bad!


Beerios posted:

Let's not forget the Craftsman Giant loving Screwdriver:

Handy for drat near any job (other than driving slotted screws), and when it breaks from being used as a prybar for the hundredth time, just take it to Sears and get a new one for free.
Last time I posted that in a tool thread I got bitched at -- apparently using a screwdriver for things it's not intended for is a Bad Thing. I've been using a Giant loving Screwdriver as crowbar, chisel, punch, etc. my whole life, as has my dad, but I'll take any excuse to buy a new tool, so I got some screwdrivers that are intended to be hammered on and pried with:



Stanley Demo Drivers, $10 for the pair at your local Lowe's/Home Depot. Sadly, that's the biggest they get -- there is one with a 1/2" tip (finally -- it wasn't out yet when I got those), but it's the same 10" long. Thicker shaft, though, so it might be worth buying anyway.

Also pictured: three-pound hammer. Surprisingly useful in automotive work.



Here they are with my previous Giant loving Screwdriver, an 11" x 1/2" model from a Wal-Mart Popular Mechanics-brand set. Despite the naysayers' prediction of breakage and maiming, it's held up just fine for five years of hard use, including prying by hammering the tip into a small gap, then twisting the shaft with a Big loving Crescent Wrench. Square-shaft screwdrivers are awesome. (Edit: I'm pretty sure the Stanley ones are round specifically to prevent that sort of thing.)

Chillbro Baggins fucked around with this message at 03:32 on Mar 6, 2008

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Chillbro Baggins
Oct 8, 2004
Bad Angus! Bad!


IOwnCalculus posted:

They are absolutely hideous and one actually has about a 30* bend from god only knows what
Give it time. There are a couple like that in my late grandfather's shop. I need to dig through there next time I'm at Grandmother's house, and claim my inheritance (and also take pictures for an awesome old tools megathread).

Here are a few artsy macro shots of the bigass Crescent wrench I mentioned in my previous post, because everybody knows the shape of it. 12" model I got from my dad, it may have been his dad's.

Chillbro Baggins
Oct 8, 2004
Bad Angus! Bad!


sharkytm posted:

I love my 18" Craftsman adjustable. I use it as a hammer just as much as I use it as a wrench. I used to keep it in my car for a "tire knocker"... AKA headsplitter.
Here's my preferred blunt object (24" pipe wrench). I have no actual non-felonious use for it, but it was only $12.


Paint job inspired by this picture from the Warhammer 40k thread.

Chillbro Baggins
Oct 8, 2004
Bad Angus! Bad!


Dark Solux posted:

My tool storage situation is a sad sight.

Same here. I've got a Craftsman Rally Box for the socket set, box-end wrenches, and suchlike, and a big plastic toolbox for the non-automotive tools (hammers, screwdrivers, Crescent wrenches, etc.), and a big sack of 18v cordless power tools*. Unfortunately I don't have room for one of those huge things (nor do I have $120 ).


*This kit, in case you were wondering. It's pretty decent for the money. The one bad comment on that page is about defective batteries; I think they fixed that, and in any case, I've never had a problem with mine. Awesome drill, good circular saw, good-as-you-can-get-with-cordless Sawzall-type saw, and pointless flashlight. Mine came with a sander instead of the Sawzall, and I acquired the latter separately.

No complaints from me -- the drill is badass, both saws will hack through multiple 2x4s with ease, the flashlight may be useful if you don't own a 6D Maglite, and the sander . . . sands well. Mine was all Christmas presents, but I'd gladly pay for it. Here's the original kit with a lovely little stepstool I built from scrap wood as a test (reciprocating saw not pictured; got it the following year):


Now I want to cut our dead Jeep in half to test the reciprocating saw. Too bad the apartment complex has rules prohibiting that sort of thing.

Chillbro Baggins fucked around with this message at 15:28 on Mar 6, 2008

Chillbro Baggins
Oct 8, 2004
Bad Angus! Bad!


Nitrox posted:

They ARE interchangeable! If you can, avoid the old batteries at all.

I wish that I could post a picture of my saw, but it's rather simple. Get a toggle switch, like this one and about 12" of wire. [how to]

Here is a crude drawing to help you understand it better.



Can you beef it up/remove the safety while keeping the original trigger? The variable speed is a big thing for me. I'm satisfied (so far) with the power, but I'd love to take out that stupid-rear end safety button.

Chillbro Baggins
Oct 8, 2004
Bad Angus! Bad!


Dark Solux posted:

Yeah I went to sears today to look at tool boxes but they didn't have any three piece combos for less than like 300$. Oh well. There's always the US General boxes at HF

Check Tractor Supply, if there's one in town. They had some nice metal toolboxes at decent prices last time I was there.

Chillbro Baggins
Oct 8, 2004
Bad Angus! Bad!


Nitrox posted:

No idea, but I'm sure it's possible.

I did it because never in my right mind would I use anything between "go" and "stop". Plus I don't have to have my finger on the trigger when the saw is running. Makes overhead cutting much easier.

Well, I got the safety out. It's not electrical at all, just a spring-loaded bit that blocks the trigger when it's centered. Easy to remove, and I recommend doing so.

But don't pull the trigger assembly out if you're not replacing it with a toggle switch. The wires coming off the battery are just kind of stuck into spring clips in the switch body, and it's a bitch and a half to make them stick back in once you've accidentally pulled them out. I ended up using a pair of little needlenose pliers to stuff the loose wire in good and tight, and tested it five times before putting it back together.

Another lesson learned from that project: If you're going to fill the safety-button holes with epoxy (gently caress the warranty!), do it while you've got it split in twain -- JB Weld is affected by gravity to a surprising degree, and doesn't take kindly to being on opposite sides of something.

You know, I never have been able to get JB Weld to work right. Do I just fail at estimating amounts, or is it worthy of the "tools that suck" thread? Edit: Probably the latter -- my dad can do it. Also, it's made locally in Sulfur Springs, TX. I think it's the best thing ever to come out of northeast Texas, but that's not saying much.

Edit again: Now that I think about it, I'm going to vote "it's awesome and I suck" on JB Weld. Here's the transfer case of my Jeep repaired with the stuff after the limited-slip doohickey blew and shattered the case like an eggshell. The doohickey only drove the front wheels; it worked just fine like this, albeit RWD-only, for several months until I found a replacement.



Chillbro Baggins fucked around with this message at 12:01 on Mar 7, 2008

Chillbro Baggins
Oct 8, 2004
Bad Angus! Bad!


RealKyleH posted:

Harbor Freight Electronic Ear Muffs:
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ct...temnumber=92851

These things are awesome.

I have a pair too, and agree. They're pretty cool. When I got them, I wore them around the house for a few hours, occasionally clapping to make them cut out. They're worth $10 just to play with like that.

Chillbro Baggins
Oct 8, 2004
Bad Angus! Bad!


hippynerd posted:

Anyone ever use the GraBit ?
http://www.official-tv-online.net/grab
I've seen it on tv, and thought, looks like it probably works.. $20 seems a little high for 3 little bits.
More like "looks gimmicky as hell." I'd buy the Harbor Freight knockoff for $5, but I don't think it's worth $20.

If you've got a small screw with a stripped head, cut a slot in it with a Dremel and use a regular screwdriver. If it's a big bolt, drill + extractor.

Chillbro Baggins
Oct 8, 2004
Bad Angus! Bad!


Hypnolobster posted:

I agree. I have a friend who likes to buy every gimmicky tool he sees on TV.
I only buy gimmicky useless as-seen-on-TV Craftsman tools. Speaking of which, didn't they have a similar thing at one point?

It's a good thing I haven't had cable for years, and have InediblePenguin to quickly drag me past the hardware department whenever we're in a Sears.




To be fair, the Handi-Cut or whatever it's called is decently useful, and that thing with the orange handle was a lifesaver until I broke down and bought a socket to fit the only bolt I ever used it on. The wrench-thing has already been reviewed (sucks), the Robo-Grip pliers get a resounding "meh" (get some real ChannelLocks, ya lazy bum), and the big chrome thing I forget the name of is but useless (I never could keep it spinning properly).



Edit because I took too long to take the picture:

hippynerd posted:

I usually avoid the problem entirely by just not re-using screws or bolts if they show too much wear.
I usually strip them the first time I try to take them out.

Also, I forgot to mention the worst-case scenario: Try to drill the head completely off, realize you don't have a big enough drill bit, chop it the rest of the way off with your three-pound hammer and big loving screwdriver cold chisel, then unscrew the stub with Vise-Grips. Or just skip straight to that solution because hammering on poo poo is therapeutic. I my hammer.

Chillbro Baggins fucked around with this message at 18:23 on Mar 11, 2008

Chillbro Baggins
Oct 8, 2004
Bad Angus! Bad!


iscariot posted:

http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00952156000P

Seems similar in theory to the Grabit.
That's the one I was thinking of.

They need to make something like that, but with a regular screwdriver handle (preferably in the style of the Stanley Demo Drivers), so you can hammer it in to get a good grip. It should also have a square shank so you can turn it with a wrench.

Stripped Phillips head? Phillips in so tight the driver cams out? Stripped square driver? Odd-sized Torx, and you're replacing it with a real screw?

I'd buy a set.


Speaking of odd-sized Torx, where can I get some smaller than T10? I run across a surprising number of screws that are the next size down -- most recently when busting the magnets of of a dead HDD yesterday morning. (I ended up doing the too-small drill bit + Stanley Demo Driver/3-pound hammer trick, since I didn't care about the screws or the case.)


And on a completely unrelated note, has anybody ever bought cold chisels from Harbor Freight or Big Lots (preferably the latter, since there's one in town)? Because I need some.


One last thing: What do they actually do at bearing supply shops? Because there are TWO of them here in town, and every time I drive past, I get a giggle out of thinking it's "bearing" like "fishing" and they sell Marlin Guide Guns and shotgun slugs. Obviously they're actually in the friction-reduction business, but there just doesn't seem to be enough of a market here to support two stores.

Chillbro Baggins
Oct 8, 2004
Bad Angus! Bad!


EvilDonald posted:

I always use the organic torque wrench for wheels. Just get them...tight.
"As tight as you can get it, plus a quarter turn" is my dad's go-to torque for . . . well, pretty much everything (adjusted by how the "as tight as you can get it" is achieved -- e.g. for valve cover bolts use a slippery screwdriver handle and 1/4"-drive socket, for spark plugs a short-handled ratchet, for lugnuts a three-foot 1/2" breaker bar). It's never failed us.

Of course, this is the guy who, when clearing LZs in Vietnam, looked at the formulas that tell you how much explosive to use, decided the variable "p" meant "plenty," and used twenty feet of Primacord to tie a pound of C4 to a tree he could've cut down with his pocketknife.


On a similar note, does anybody actually screw oil filters on as the instructions say? Something like gasket contact plus a fraction of a turn? That seems incredibly loose to me, and I always crank 'em down as tight as I can by hand, and have never had a leak. Of course, Wal*Mart apparently uses the tire-changing impact guns for oil filters, so I doubt it's all that important.

Chillbro Baggins
Oct 8, 2004
Bad Angus! Bad!


hippynerd posted:

Uhm... doesnt that leave a hole like 5 wide by about a foot deep? seems like a pretty crappy LZ if you ask me.
Their helicopters never actually touched the ground outside the wire, so they just needed to get the trees out of the way.


Neither of us has ever broken a bolt using the "estimated torque" method. We have, however, broken a lot of bolts taking them out.

I do own a torque wrench -- one of those cheap clicky ones, probably from Harbor Freight. I've checked a couple of things after estimating the torque by hand, and they were decently close. If it's something important like head bolts, I use the torque wrench, but most everything else I just tighten until it feels right.


For oil filters, there's definitely a happy medium between what the instructions say and what the quickie-lubes do. I screw mine down as tight as I can with my bare hand (I don't usually wear gloves when working on the car. Not much point in it since I always end up dripping oil down to my armpits taking the old filter off).

This is the best tool I've found for removing oil filters installed by roid-raged apes. If it slips, just crank it down another notch and crush the fucker so it'll have some corners to grab onto.

Chillbro Baggins
Oct 8, 2004
Bad Angus! Bad!


Kynetx posted:

Yeah, I just chuck a 21MM on to the trusty 1/2" impact wrench and torque it till it stops.
I stand on the ratchet handle to torque lugnuts. It's a foot long and I weigh 130 pounds, so that's about right, innit? My cheap clicky torque wrench seems to agree, anyway. (I drive old Fords, so the spec is 100 ft-lb.)


hippynerd posted:

box/combo wrench + hammer.
Seconding this. A three-pound drilling hammer is more useful than you'd think. Harbor Freight has 'em for . But definitely use a box-end wrench, don't use a ratchet 'til it's loose. My 1/2" Craftsman ratchet makes funny noises, and my 3/8" only catches about half the time now. I really need to take them to the store and get them swapped out/get repair kits.

Chillbro Baggins
Oct 8, 2004
Bad Angus! Bad!


Today I checked the mail and found an unexpected $650 check (from cashing out my stock options from a former job; I did it some time ago, but it didn't go through until the end of the quarter).

I also got a Harbor Freight flier.

It's like God is trying to tell me something.

Chillbro Baggins fucked around with this message at 08:14 on Sep 19, 2009

Chillbro Baggins
Oct 8, 2004
Bad Angus! Bad!


Wagonburner posted:

How high can I charge this thing? I take it to work to blow poo poo out with, and charge it to 100psi all the time and it seems ok, I'm scared to go higher until anonymous internet users tell me it's ok.
I've emailed my HVAC-tech dad, will edit when I get an answer.

In the meantime, here's what the valve looks like when DuPont gives it to you:

Click here for the full 524x800 image.


And this may be of interest:

Click here for the full 800x351 image.

Note the last line.

You should really just go buy a real air tank at Harbor Freight. that way you know how much it can hold, and have somebody to sue when it blows up in your face anyway. They're only, what, $40?

Though the Freon tank should have an overpressure-blowout-safety-thing (that round thing behind the valve in my pic), so it probably won't kill you if you overfill it. Just point the top of it away from your face/anything else you value while filling.

Chillbro Baggins
Oct 8, 2004
Bad Angus! Bad!


Glynis27 posted:

Just wanted to say that I got one of those exhaust cutters someone posted earlier (like a chain with metal discs) and it is the greatest thing ever! No more loud tools or shards of hot metal and rust flying all over the place. Has been making this exhaust build for my Jeep much less horrible. Thanks so much. I was totally dreading it.
Yeah, but you can't light a smoke off of it. When I got my exhaust replaced, I watched the mechanic, and he lit a cigarette with the gas axe while he was taking off the old muffler. Can't get much more than that.

Chillbro Baggins
Oct 8, 2004
Bad Angus! Bad!


I went to Harbor Freight yesterday to pick up some electrical connectors and tape, and looked at the power tools. Lots of angle grinders on sale for $20.

I realized I have always had an angle grinder-shaped hole in my life.

So I went back today and bought the $34 one. That paddle switch alone is totally cool enough to make it worth the extra $14.

It says in the manual that using it for "polishing or cutting-off" is "not recommended". That's just to cover their asses, right? It didn't explode when I slapped on a cutoff wheel and removed a rusted bolt that's been bugging me, at least.

Also in the manual: handling the cord exposes you to lead. Hooray, China!


Of course, I didn't really need an angle grinder, aside from that one small bolt that I could've cut with the Dremel. I suppose it'll be good for sharpening the mower blades come spring. Maybe I should start a YouTube series where I sand/grind/deburr/cut various things. With joke video of me brandishing it at the pet bunnies.

Chillbro Baggins
Oct 8, 2004
Bad Angus! Bad!


eddiewalker posted:

Good thing you bought the 4.5" kind. I steer anyone I can away from the 4" ones. It seriously won't fit any of HFs own accessories.
Yeah, I saw somebody complaining about that earlier in the thread.

Also mentioned way back, and replied to incredulously: 9" angle grinders. HF has one for $60.

I also picked up a variety pack of wheels for it -- a couple of grinding wheels, a couple of flap wheels, and some cutoffs. Now i just need something to use it on.

Chillbro Baggins
Oct 8, 2004
Bad Angus! Bad!


Josh Lyman posted:

My mom bought a hardware set about 15 years ago called "DO-IT HERSELF" that was light blue.

My mom has the same kit in the trunk of her car for emergency tools, also missing several pieces. It also came in pink -- she got her mom the pink one at the same time.

Josh Lyman posted:

Should I focus on getting Craftsmen branded stuff or does that not really matter? $120 is a bit more than I'd like to spend but I imagine I could put together a set of essentials for $50.

What's the consensus on a tool boxes vs. bags?
The original kit probably wasn't all that high-quality.

As for a toolbox, this thing is pretty awesome for a general-purpose home-repair kit.



I use one at work, resetting grocery stores -- you need a surprising number of tools for it, and the stepstool is essential. Tangent: Most of my coworkers carry rubber mallets for when a bent shelf needs a bit of massaging. I carry a three-pound drilling hammer. My coworkers rarely use their mallets, they just ask me to beat on things.

One of my coworkers has a girly (i.e. all-pink) toolkit that came with a stepstool toolbox, but I can't remember the brand name, sorry. Bonus of pink tools: her stuff goes missing a lot less than anybody else's. (I, on the other hand, just write my name on all my tools, only loan them to people I trust, and make it known that I will use the 3lb hammer on anybody that touches my toolbox without permission.)

Chillbro Baggins
Oct 8, 2004
Bad Angus! Bad!


Skyssx posted:

Tool bags are for taking places, tool boxes are for sitting on benches, again IMO.
To be more specific, tool bags are for poo poo you have to schlep from the truck to the site for every job; if it normally lives in the truck or on the bench and only needs to be schlepped occasionally, go with a box. Ideally have a bag and a box, and keep the core tools in the bag and take things out of the box and put in the bag as needed.

Rhyno posted:

So how many of you live in apartments and keep a rolling chest there? I was looking at apartments this week and one of them had this nook behind the front door that would fit a tool chest almost perfectly.
I definitely considered (but could not afford) a rolling chest with a work-surface top when I lived in an apartment and had my "shop" in a closet. Now that I'm renting a house with a garage, I'm pricing 2x4s and looking at back issues of Popular Mechanics to build a proper workbench.

Chillbro Baggins
Oct 8, 2004
Bad Angus! Bad!


Rhyno posted:

Well I already own a rolling chest full of tools so it's not a money issue with me. It's just that my current place doesn't have room but the place I looked at does. And on top of that it has a walk-ou patio which ends a few feet from where I would be parking.

Sounds like a plan, then. My patio had a fence around it, which led to me carrying the tools out, setting them on the patio rail when finished, and finally remembering to go get them from the indoors side the next day. i eventually got a toolbelt, and then never had to work on the car again before moving.

Chillbro Baggins
Oct 8, 2004
Bad Angus! Bad!


I have a little 8" pipe wrench I got from my dad that has a distinct curve to the handle. I really need to ask about the story behind that.


The pipe wrench customer reviews on Northern Tool's site are hilarious:

On the 3-foot one: "[3/5 stars] I have not used this wrench much, but from the looks of it I would not put a six foot cheater pipe on it. The quality looks fair, but it all goes back to you get what you pay for. If you need a large light duty pipe wrench then this is the one for you."

The five-footer: "[2/5] Tool little on heavy side. Has good grip but fails to adjust without alot of handling. Starts to bend very easy when a cheater bar is attached"


I have a 24" one from there (it's $13, why not?), and haven't broken it. Of course, I have yet to use it on big pipe or with a cheater bar; I mostly keep it around for hitting things, ripping out studs (like a Stanley Fubar, but adjustable!), and the other day I took out the upper jaw, turned it backwards, and used it as a prybar to lift a washing machine that needed leveling.

Chillbro Baggins
Oct 8, 2004
Bad Angus! Bad!


I finally came up with an excuse to use the HF angle grinder, and it performed admirably. We've finally started unpacking from the move, and when it was time to assemble the dining table, we couldn't find the wedges that hold the legs on. So I took some thickish sheetmetal I had laying around, folded it in half to make the right thickness, cut strips off the folded edge, and ground them to shape.

In retrospect, I should've drilled a hole or something in the big ends to make it possible to pull them out if ever we move again (the originals had a tab to hammer on with a punch for removal), but oh well, I've got Vise-Grips.

Chillbro Baggins
Oct 8, 2004
Bad Angus! Bad!


zifflol posted:

The technical term for these are "analog impact wrenches"
I own two three-pound hammers -- a short-handled drilling hammer, and a long-handled engineer hammer. They're more useful than you'd think.

In completely unrelated news, I need to take my craftsman ratchets in and get replacements -- the half-inch is kind of sloppy, and the 3/8" I have to hold the lever to the appropriate side with my thumb in order for it to catch.

Chillbro Baggins
Oct 8, 2004
Bad Angus! Bad!


astrollinthepork posted:

I can feel pain in my knuckles just by reading this.
Not if you use a 3-pound drilling hammer to turn it! The poor man's impact wrench: whatever you can get on the nut + drilling hammer (if there's room to swing a 4lb engineer's hammer you should be able to use a cheater bar/pipe). Also if the ratchet you're using to turn the bolt is 3/8" or 1/4", you can use the 1/2" ratchet as a hammer in tight places.

Yeah, I've stripped the gears in a full set of Craftsman ratchets. It's always fun when you go in for a warranty swap and the clerk just stares at you for a minute. But a man who manages to bend a half-inch-drive ratchet handle is not a man to be hosed with.

That reminds me of the comments on some tool shop's website about the five-foot pipe wrenches -- some roughnecks were quite annoyed that the handle bent when they hitched it up to their big-diesel 1-ton Dodge dually and floored it to break loose a stubborn bolt the size of your thigh.

Chillbro Baggins
Oct 8, 2004
Bad Angus! Bad!


14 INCH DICK TURBO posted:

I just found this hammer and I don't care that it appears to be more for home demo and not automotive, nor do I care enough to decide if it's gimmicky or not because loving look at it.

The Dead On Annihilator.



gently caress yes. And if that wasn't enough.



Bah. You really wanna make a wall wish it'd never been built (or take apart a car using only muscle power), get yourself a set of irons:



You can also open a beer bottle on either the Halligan or the axe, and not be viewed as some kind of ninny who needs a special bottle opener.

(Non-ninny beer opening: hook cap ridges on any hard flat surface -- in this case, hold the axe between your knees or something so it's upright, and use the top -- and slap the wrist of the bottle-holding hand with the other hand. Warning: will put a dent in drat near every finish known to man, so don't try it on the edge of a friend's fancy table/countertop.)


Lord Gaga posted:

I cant think of a reason to ever do stick.
It's good for learning (since you have to maintain the gap while it burns away, hell of a training aid if you have shaky hands or poor depth perception), structural steel (burning electrodes as wide as a Sharpie, with amperage that could melt God), and tight spaces (can't fit your hands in? Take a three-foot stick and bend it so it'll reach!).

But yeah, if you're not getting paid and there's an alternative available stick welding is pretty crap.

Edit: it gets less crap as the amperage/margin of error increases. My brother learned on structural steel, then got a little 70A plug-in stick buzzbox for a personal project and couldn't get it to work; I learned on the little buzzbox, and can make beautiful beads with flux-core wire.

Chillbro Baggins fucked around with this message at 08:55 on Nov 26, 2011

Chillbro Baggins
Oct 8, 2004
Bad Angus! Bad!


GnarlyCharlie4u posted:

Pegboard EVERYWHERE! (save the areas where you'll be shelving.

Why not put pegboard behind the shelves too, in case you decide to move the shelves? If I ever get enough money to build my ideal shop, it's going to have a wall or two of Madix gondolas (there are a couple of competing brands, but Madix is the best).

Chillbro Baggins
Oct 8, 2004
Bad Angus! Bad!


Christobevii3 posted:

Their "professional" drills are like $30 and should be ok for that. You might be better getting a walmart black n decker.

When I decided I need a corded drill I went to my local pawn shop and paid $30 for a Bosch (made in West Germany). Got it home, and immediately snapped two quarter-inch drill bits. I know pawn shops are a ripoff, but I think I got my money's worth.

Chillbro Baggins
Oct 8, 2004
Bad Angus! Bad!


I have a set of stubby GearWrenches. They're really nice in tight spaces, especially when clearance parallel to the bolt is an issue -- several times I've gotten a ratchet stuck between the fan and radiator because the fan bolts are too long (I have bad luck with water pumps), so I had to screw it back in and then use the GearWrench on it to allow it to come all the way out.

But yeah, keep the regular wrenches for hammering on or bending to reach something really hard to get to.

Chillbro Baggins
Oct 8, 2004
Bad Angus! Bad!


Suniikaa posted:

Go with the axe, it's more fun and you get a workout.

I have felled trees with that axe, it's pretty solid. And yeah, it makes your arms buff/sore as all hell. That reminds me, I need to chop down some more trees, I'm getting a bit flabby in the biceps.

Edit: and the axe chips make good kindling if you're chopping firewood. Sawzall is kinda weak for logs bigger than your wrist, either man up and use an axe or wedges and sledge or get a chainsaw.

Chillbro Baggins fucked around with this message at 09:12 on Oct 14, 2012

Chillbro Baggins
Oct 8, 2004
Bad Angus! Bad!


ExplodingSims posted:

Maybe I just don't get the Harbor Freight mentality 'cause the nearest one has always been like a hour and a half away, but is gambling and having to drive back to store constantly really better than just coughing up the extra cash for a higher quality tool?

I love HF. Though you may be right -- my local store is close enough that I could probably return a power tool while standing in my yard if the wind was right and I swung it by the cord to throw it.

Maybe I've just been lucky -- I have two angle grinders, a $20 one from Harbor Freight and a fancy Makita my dad gave me for Christmas one year, both subjected to similar abuse; the Makita, I've had to put down because it got uncomfortably hot (while wearing welding gloves), but the HF one has taken everything I've thrown at it without complaint.

Hummer Driving human being posted:

Aside from air tools and compressors, what 10 or so tools could accomplish 50% or more of regular automotive maintenance work?
No toolbox is complete without a 3-pound hammer. It's one of those things you don't think you'd ever need, but once you have one, you don't know how you lived without it.

Chillbro Baggins
Oct 8, 2004
Bad Angus! Bad!


DJ Commie posted:

I really like my Lincoln Weld-Pak 140 from Home Depot. Its a cheaper machine (got it on sale for $450), but 120V is pretty useful since I have a 220V/250A Miller stick welder for heavy duty stuff. I usually run .030 fluxcore in the 140, I haven't leased a bottle yet and made the move to MIG.

I have the next one down and it's decent, even when not quite using it to its full potential because my garage only has 15A breakers. FCAW is perfectly acceptable; it takes a bit more work to make pretty than MIG, but works better in a breeze.

Chillbro Baggins
Oct 8, 2004
Bad Angus! Bad!


I guess I won the lottery in that my HF angle grinder with HF wheels hasn't shivved me yet.

On the other hand, I wear a leather apron, welding gloves, long-sleeved shirt that's basically sail canvas, and eyepro ranging from welding mask to motorcycle helmet when using it, just in case.

Chillbro Baggins
Oct 8, 2004
Bad Angus! Bad!


McSpatula posted:

If it won't move at all, is the mirror affixed to the wall with some sort of adhesive backing? One retaining bracket alone shouldn't be enough to keep it in place like that.

Once again, a 3-pound drilling hammer solves all problems. Mirrors are cheap these days, and you'll get time served on the 7 years bad luck from having a mirror glued to the wall.

Or just use your prying implement of choice to bend the brackets enough to get pliers on them and rip them out.

Edit: but yeah, a Dremel and the fiberglass cutoff wheels would make short work of the brackets. And when the mirror stays on the wall, you'll kick yourself for not heeding my and McSpatula's advice and spending the on fancy Dremel bits instead of a hammer.

Chillbro Baggins fucked around with this message at 11:44 on Apr 5, 2014

Chillbro Baggins
Oct 8, 2004
Bad Angus! Bad!


Some racecars/4x4s have a bit of chain in the wheel well that is just long enough to hook to a lug on the axle when sitting; stow it for suspension travel, clip it to the axle to get the tire off the ground quicker when jacking the frame.

Or just put the jack under the pumpkin or A-arm. On my roommate's Civic, using the designated jack points on the frame isn't that bad. On my cop car or my late Wagoneer, on the other hand, the low-profile jack that fits under the Honda barely unloads the springs at max height on the frame.

Chillbro Baggins
Oct 8, 2004
Bad Angus! Bad!


the spyder posted:

Ironically enough, we broke our sawzall cutting a miata chassis in half. I was going to buy a new one, but I grabbed a older Milwaukee off craigslist. It let me to wonder though, what are you guys using? Milwaukee, Porter Cable, Makita?

Seeing as how you used their brand name to describe the general idea of the thing, Milwaukee is probably the best.

jailbait#3 posted:

Splurge on the 110v DC (NOT the AC buzzbox) arc welder and auto-dimming helmet. It's tiny and makes great looking welds, unlike the fluxcore splatter machine. It's easy to learn; you should have the hang of it halfway through a box of rods.

Is that the tiny beige one? The tiny beige one has good reviews, I almost bought one until my brother gave me a lovely Campbell Hausfeld buzzbox he got for a one-time job and later bought me (and himself) a pair of midrange Lincoln fluxcore machines for Christmas.

If you're serious about welding and not just tinkering, get a 240V machine if you can power it. Much better than anything that plugs into a standard outlet, and even those trip the standard breaker at the highest setting -- every 110V circuit in your house is probably 15A, maybe 20A. The welder pulls 20A on its highest setting, and the outlet it's plugged into is probably on the same circuit as the lights.

Though if you're just learning, the little 110V ones are cheap enough to give away or sell for a pittance if you decide not to upgrade, and still handy for small jobs if you do upgrade.

kastein posted:

I have the FuBar. I honestly use my regular old 36" wrecking bars more, they're better suited to most jobs unless you just need to absolutely, indiscriminately wreck poo poo.

The FuBar is great when you have to twist slightly warped framing lumber into position with one hand while nailing it, though. Usually the shorter FuBar (yeah, I have both) is enough to make it comfortable, but occasionally the larger one works better.
Seconding the three-foot wrecking bar for general tasks, though I really want a Halligan to go with my fire axe (it was on sale for $20 at Harbor Freight, and an axe is always good to have around.)

jammyozzy posted:

There's always a big loving sledge for some percussive maintenance too
A three-pound drilling hammer (or a 4-lb engineer's hammer, if you don't have to fit it in a small toolbox) is the bee's tits.

Also a good buy: Stanley demo drivers. Y'know all those things you're not supposed to use screwdrivers for, like chisleing, prying, drilling, etc. but do anyway? They're built for it. Toolmonger's review sold me on them, in which they hammered one all the way through a 2x4, handle and all, with no damage other than a few scratches to the rubber grips. I've used them for prying, chiseling through small bolts (in conjunction with the 3-lb hammer), and as a non-marring hammer (hold it by the shaft and whack the thing with the handle; chews up the finish, but hey, that's just more grip) more than I've actually used them to turn screws.

4-lb hammer and Stanley Demo Drivers:


Another wonderful thing:


I have one for work, thinking of getting another one for the around-the-house tools.

InitialDave posted:

Yes, you should get a torque wrench for rebuilding stuff, but right now you'll be mainly stripping stuff, so I say prioritise getting the beefiest breaker bar you can find.

The big hammer is good in lieu of/in spaces too tight for a breaker bar, as long as you have ratchets with a good warranty.

melon cat posted:

I guess I can just go with a a hacksaw and lots of elbow grease.
Very little elbow grease. For a cat toy, you'd either be cutting one big piece of pipe or maybe six little ones; either way, it takes about five minutes, including the measuring, loving it up, and redoing it. If you plan to use it in the future and need to justify it to the wife, sure, use it as an excuse to get a Sawzall or mitre saw, but if you're only cutting PVC just get a $10 hacksaw.

Chillbro Baggins
Oct 8, 2004
Bad Angus! Bad!


peepsalot posted:

Those stanley demo drivers look neat, but I couldn't find them on the stanley site, they seem to be discontinued?

Well, balls. What if I ever manage to break them?

Dewalt makes a similar set, and the one Amazon review says they're better than the Stanley version. They look pretty much identical except the Dewalts don't have the rubber grips, just solid plastic handles but the same shape. I wonder if they licensed a third-party design, and the patent owner jumped ship when the contract was up for renewal.

Edit: I've been watching Let's Plays of The Forest, in which your starting weapon/tool is the fire axe from the airliner you crashed on.



That's a funky blade shape. Is it because it's more a can opener writ large than an actual axe? Could you chop down a tree with it?

Chillbro Baggins fucked around with this message at 06:03 on Jun 21, 2014

Chillbro Baggins
Oct 8, 2004
Bad Angus! Bad!


Splizwarf posted:

Those screwdrivers are nice. You also want a set of the yellow and black ones, they're solid steel all the way through and designed specifically to be hit with a hammer the way we all already do anyway.

The Stanley Demo Drivers (now Dewalt-branded, but same design) are similar. I bought a set after seeing a Toolmonger post where they hammered the loving things all the way through a 2x4, handle and all.

I'm a retail merchandiser -- I rearrange grocery stores -- and have to work with old busted gondola shelves. My coworkers all carry rubber mallets and a prybar of some sort; I have a 3-pound drilling hammer and a pair of Stanley screwdrivers. Guess who always gets asked for help when a 4-foot shelf has to go into a 47.5" space. When I need a light touch of a hammer, I use the handle of the screwdriver. And I'm the only person that hasn't had any tools permanently borrowed, because everybody knows that if they steal my poo poo I'll use the hammer on 'em, and if they steal my hammer I'll shank 'em with the screwdriver.

Also these things are great. I'm considering buying a second one to use around the house:

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Chillbro Baggins
Oct 8, 2004
Bad Angus! Bad!


Splizwarf posted:

Buy one , right now, and then you don't need to worry about it anymore.

Or build one out of plywood.

They have them for $25 at the better farm stores (I got mine at a regional chain that's sort of like Tractor Supply). Also if you're in the business and know the right people, Kraft apparently supplies them to their reps. (I represent Kraft but through a broker, pretty sure you only get one with the Kraft logo on it if you're one of their DSD people.)

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