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8-bit Miniboss
May 24, 2005

CORPO COPS CAME FOR MY


fletcher posted:

Thanks for the info!

I think I'm gonna give up on trying to get an 8 bay compact NAS without super loud fans and just get a Node 804. I liked having the Mini SAS HD to Mini SAS HD to keep the cabling mess down, and the hot swap bays were certainly nice, but it seems like none of the compact NAS chassis handle cooling very well.

The system is mostly quiet. The CPU fan on this embedded Xeon can get loud though when it's under load. If it weren't for the fact I'm moving the box elsewhere I'd be swapping that out somehow. It's a bit of a pain to deal with from what I've seen.

8-bit Miniboss fucked around with this message at 21:24 on May 27, 2020

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necrobobsledder
Mar 21, 2005
Lay down your soul to the gods rock 'n roll

Nap Ghost

Selachian posted:

As for Amazon, while cloud backups are great for supplemental security, as an archivist I am biased toward having a local copy that I can see, handle, and control myself, as opposed to having the materials off on someone else's computers who knows where, and at the mercy of someone else's policies. Yeah, it may seem overly paranoid to worry about Amazon going out of business, but a century ago people would've said the same about Woolworth's.
My wife is a museum collections specialist and works with various specimens at a national museum, so I get the point of physical collections work unlike a lot of software folks. The biggest hurdle for long-term storage isn't related to the storage itself but how you'll even read it later on to begin with. You'll need to have copies of software that can read the format (see: Flash video, RealMedia) and ways to virtualize the OSes that they are compatible with. There's been discussions of computer archaeologists being necessary in various cyberpunk literature with good precedent, and you'll need to provide as much possible information to make it possible to read the encodings of the data again which is very different than physical collection handling (microfilm isn't terribly different I suppose).

Better options for putting the data somewhere on a bad budget honestly IMO is to use large hard drives locally, burn DVD+R gold media, and use Backblaze B2 Cloud or Wasabi cloud and make sure to keep tabs on them to make sure they're not going out of business (these providers do not charge for data egress and monthly costs are far, far lower with good enough reliability). Also, you will need a workflow well documented and easy enough to maintain across future OSes. In the scheme of hundreds of years, Amazon isn't terribly different than these smaller companies and you'll need to give enough help so someone can re-do all the crap all over again in maybe 30 years (holographic storage? water droplets? bacteria? COVID-49? who knows?). The big problem for most education-adjacent institutions right now really is budget - it is jaw-droppingly bad in every continent and name-drop I've ever seen (I'm aware of what even Ivy League museums fund - it's labors of love all around). Business needs are not the same thing as archival needs in any way due to the fact that no nation state is trying to take down your archive.... at this time, and they have much more regulatory scrutiny overall.

poverty goat
Feb 15, 2004



I have 3 WD reds in raidz in my home NAS, all purchased at the same time, and it just occurred to me that they've been running continuously for 6 years. FreeNAS is still perfectly happy with all 3 of them, but they're getting up there. Should I think about throwing in a spare or two before something terrible happens?

fletcher
Jun 27, 2003

ken park is my favorite movie

Cybernetic Crumb

poverty goat posted:

I have 3 WD reds in raidz in my home NAS, all purchased at the same time, and it just occurred to me that they've been running continuously for 6 years. FreeNAS is still perfectly happy with all 3 of them, but they're getting up there. Should I think about throwing in a spare or two before something terrible happens?

I think it depends on a lot of factors (usage patterns, temperature, etc) but the general rule of thumb I have been using is replacing the drives in my NAS every 4 years (assuming 24/7 operation).

Some more info on this from Backblaze: https://www.backblaze.com/blog/how-...sk-drives-last/

Is the data on your drives irreplaceable? Do you have backups? Have you verified your ability to restore from a backup if necessary?

D. Ebdrup
Mar 13, 2009



Even if you turn off the safeties, EXT4 on MDADM and XFS can't compete with ZFS.

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D. Ebdrup
Mar 13, 2009



Resilvering always looks... interesting when you've got 'top -aHIjStqz -s 1' running:

All of the threads end up being about 110% CPU, but distributed over 8 CPU cores with SMT, so it's barely warming the server up compared to a full package build.

The upshot is that I went from 4.71TiB to 9.51TiB of usable storage by replacing two 5400RPM 466GiB drives, and there's still another 7200RPM 932GiB drive to be replaced before the pool will reach its penultimate size.

I hope I can live with 21TiB usable storage for archival purposes for a while, because it'll take me some time to replace 15 disks with ~8TB disks at which point it'll reach its final size - unless I'm forced to go for even bigger drives to avoid SMR.

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