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Warbird
May 23, 2012

Burn the 'dawgs
Kill the Yellowjackets
Purge the Tiger
It is better to die for Bama than to live for yourself


Fun Shoe

Warbird posted:

Forgive the basic question, but it's been driving me nuts for a couple of days now. This isn't helped by my solving this once every couple of years and promptly forgetting until it breaks again.

What's the most idiot proof way to share mounts over NFS that allows for the client to have free reign over the shared directory structures? I know that may not be best practice but for my use case it's going to be the smallest pain in the butt.

The host dirs are nobody:nogroup'd and 777'd, but the client machine only sees a subset upon mounting the share locally. The export file reads:
code:
/media 192.168.0.0/24(rw,sync,no_subtree_check)
I assume I need to tweak that to have clients access as pi/root, but I'm open to suggestions.

Ended up stumbling into a solution. It looks like the issue had something to do with my trying to do the two mounted USB HDDs in a single share. Making separate shares on the host for each and separate mounts for each on the client seems to have resolved the issue, but I'm at a loss as to why. Gift horse, mouth. iirc Samba does this fine though, but I'll need to test that out next.

Edit- And now my containers donít want to work when referencing the NFS directories. Sigh.

Warbird fucked around with this message at 17:32 on Sep 9, 2020

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movax
Aug 30, 2008



admiraldennis posted:

The ol' Cyberpower UPS on my NAS PC is reaching EOL. Looking to replace it.

One thing I noticed in my research is that UPS devices tend to have less surge protection than higher-end dedicated surge protectors. This APC, for example, cites 1080 joules. But I can get a SurgeArrest with 4320 joules.

There is a lot of "information" out there about not daisy chaining surge protectors and UPS devices. (FWIW, I have been doing this for ages on my main PC setup without issues. There's barely any outlets in this house. Which also means the PCs are all on the same circuits as window A/Cs, etc, so good surge protection is especially prudent.)

Is this just a "dummy clause" against plugging too much poo poo into a single UPS/outlet/circuit and overloading?

The UPS will be well oversized for my usage, and the only current-drawing device will be the NAS PC. Is there some hidden danger if I were to go Wall <-- UPS <-- SurgeArrest <-- NAS for an extra layer of joule protection?

If it gives you any indication, NEC stipulates for residential construction a maximum distance between outlets (IIRC, 6 ft) because so many loving fires are caused by using extension cords / similar (to be fair though, a lot of these are idiots running space heaters continuously off dollar store cords). If you're disciplined and put a surge protector in front of your UPS and tape up every other outlet on the surge suppressor, it's likely "fine", but personally I'd trust the UL-listed in-wall outlet to carry high current continuously for 10+ years vs. a power strip that you're "supposed" to toss out more frequently because it's got a cheap rear end MOV (most of them) that loses effectiveness over time if it's exposed to over-voltage conditions. That breaker up-stream is supposed to have your back.

Realistically though I doubt you would have any issues what you proposed.

D. Ebdrup
Mar 13, 2009
Probation
Can't post for 3 hours!


Warbird posted:

Forgive the basic question, but it's been driving me nuts for a couple of days now. This isn't helped by my solving this once every couple of years and promptly forgetting until it breaks again.

What's the most idiot proof way to share mounts over NFS that allows for the client to have free reign over the shared directory structures? I know that may not be best practice but for my use case it's going to be the smallest pain in the butt.

The host dirs are nobody:nogroup'd and 777'd, but the client machine only sees a subset upon mounting the share locally. The export file reads:
code:
/media 192.168.0.0/24(rw,sync,no_subtree_check)
I assume I need to tweak that to have clients access as pi/root, but I'm open to suggestions.
If you were using FreeBSD, I'd tell you to use mapall, but I'm not sure Linux implements that

D. Ebdrup fucked around with this message at 19:32 on Sep 9, 2020

Warbird
May 23, 2012

Burn the 'dawgs
Kill the Yellowjackets
Purge the Tiger
It is better to die for Bama than to live for yourself


Fun Shoe

The steps I took more or less set it up that way, but some other weirdness was the root cause. I ended up just mounting the drives to the server directly. While that did solve dockerís hang ups I now have a mysterious folder being created at boot that lives in the same location as the now locally mounted drives and appears to have the contents of one of the mounts. Itís the damnest thing, but Iím just going to leave it alone since itís not hurting anything.

DizzyBum
Apr 16, 2007




I posted in here a couple times spitballing NAS ideas but never committed to anything. Now all I have is free time, so I figured I'd revisit it.

I've got a dozen old SAS drives that have been collecting dust in a closet. Old like 2015-ish. Mostly 250 or 300 GB capacity, mostly 3.5" with a few 2.5". I want to make a NAS out of them since they haven't been used much and I'm hurting for some storage space at home. Are there enclosures I could order where I could stick a few of these drives in and get it working? I'm thinking I could use at least some of the drives in a RAID setup and then keep a few as backup in case failures happen. I'm fine with needing to do some configuration to get things working properly.

Krakkles
May 5, 2003

like and subscribe for more passive-aggressive roadway bullshit adventure in Chigcao

Updated Windows on my desktop that I access my NAS from, found out they removed support for SMBv1, which FreeNAS is/was apparently using.

Cool.

Matt Zerella
Oct 7, 2002


Shucked my first drive

(I obliterated the shell and threw it out).

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





DizzyBum posted:

I posted in here a couple times spitballing NAS ideas but never committed to anything. Now all I have is free time, so I figured I'd revisit it.

I've got a dozen old SAS drives that have been collecting dust in a closet. Old like 2015-ish. Mostly 250 or 300 GB capacity, mostly 3.5" with a few 2.5". I want to make a NAS out of them since they haven't been used much and I'm hurting for some storage space at home. Are there enclosures I could order where I could stick a few of these drives in and get it working? I'm thinking I could use at least some of the drives in a RAID setup and then keep a few as backup in case failures happen. I'm fine with needing to do some configuration to get things working properly.

I would personally be hesitant to do this in a scenario where neither drive bays nor power are free. None of the consumer-ready enclosures are going to be ready for SAS, and the products that were aimed at enterprises originally are going to be power hungry and loud. A two-drive solution with a couple of 8TB or 10TB disks in RAID1 would potentially be cheaper than just trying to get all of those drives connected.

If you just want to do it as a project, the most labor-involved way (and the one most likely to avoid loud server fans) would be an external SAS controller in the system you're plugging this into, an external SAS cable, an external/internal SAS adapter card, a SAS breakout board, and appropriate SAS cabling from there to connect to your drives. You can stick most of that in whatever case you want with a power supply.

DizzyBum
Apr 16, 2007




IOwnCalculus posted:

I would personally be hesitant to do this in a scenario where neither drive bays nor power are free. None of the consumer-ready enclosures are going to be ready for SAS, and the products that were aimed at enterprises originally are going to be power hungry and loud. A two-drive solution with a couple of 8TB or 10TB disks in RAID1 would potentially be cheaper than just trying to get all of those drives connected.

If you just want to do it as a project, the most labor-involved way (and the one most likely to avoid loud server fans) would be an external SAS controller in the system you're plugging this into, an external SAS cable, an external/internal SAS adapter card, a SAS breakout board, and appropriate SAS cabling from there to connect to your drives. You can stick most of that in whatever case you want with a power supply.

Thanks, this is exactly what I needed to know! I would rather get something up and running with little hassle (especially if it's quiet and lower-power), so I'll likely do the first option and then save the project for another time.

Rexxed
May 1, 2010

Dis is amazing!
I gotta try dis!



Krakkles posted:

Updated Windows on my desktop that I access my NAS from, found out they removed support for SMBv1, which FreeNAS is/was apparently using.

Cool.

Time to update freenas.

Krakkles
May 5, 2003

like and subscribe for more passive-aggressive roadway bullshit adventure in Chigcao

Rexxed posted:

Time to update freenas.
Yeah, you're right. Thank you.

Looks like I have ~1.5GB of RAM in my N40L, FreeNAS 11.4 wants 8GB. Is 16GB overkill? (Looks like it's $60 vs $40 so unless it's completely useless, it makes sense to me...)

This should be fun, too, because FreeNAS has been running since 2012 on a thumb drive. I think I'll probably swap that out while I'm in there to avoid that failing next.

Edit: Looks like FreeNAS recommends "more is better", so 16GB is probably worth it. They recommend ECC, and this wiki on HP N40L says no registered ... which leads to one result ($55, refurbished) on newegg.

That seems iffy. Would I be better off:
  • getting this memory?
  • giving up ECC?
  • getting less capacity?

Krakkles fucked around with this message at 22:58 on Sep 9, 2020

Paul MaudDib
May 2, 2006

"Tell me of your home world, Usul"


Krakkles posted:

Yeah, you're right. Thank you.

Looks like I have ~1.5GB of RAM in my N40L, FreeNAS 11.4 wants 8GB. Is 16GB overkill? (Looks like it's $60 vs $40 so unless it's completely useless, it makes sense to me...)

This should be fun, too, because FreeNAS has been running since 2012 on a thumb drive. I think I'll probably swap that out while I'm in there to avoid that failing next.

Edit: Looks like FreeNAS recommends "more is better", so 16GB is probably worth it. They recommend ECC, and this wiki on HP N40L says no registered ... which leads to one result ($55, refurbished) on newegg.

That seems iffy. Would I be better off:
  • getting this memory?
  • giving up ECC?
  • getting less capacity?

16GB is not excessive especially if you get into running applications/jails on your fileserver too.

https://n40l.fandom.com/wiki/Memory

you probably need a 2x8 GB kit, not just a single 16GB stick. I don't see anyone else confirming single 16GB sticks as working properly.

this is where I'd start: https://pcpartpicker.com/products/m...1,16384002&t=11

it looks like at this point none of the first-party stores (adorama, newegg, sold by amazon, etc) still carry anything that old but there's nothing wrong with the third party vendors if their reviews are OK.

Paul MaudDib fucked around with this message at 23:15 on Sep 9, 2020

Rexxed
May 1, 2010

Dis is amazing!
I gotta try dis!



Krakkles posted:

Yeah, you're right. Thank you.

Looks like I have ~1.5GB of RAM in my N40L, FreeNAS 11.4 wants 8GB. Is 16GB overkill? (Looks like it's $60 vs $40 so unless it's completely useless, it makes sense to me...)

This should be fun, too, because FreeNAS has been running since 2012 on a thumb drive. I think I'll probably swap that out while I'm in there to avoid that failing next.

Edit: Looks like FreeNAS recommends "more is better", so 16GB is probably worth it. They recommend ECC, and this wiki on HP N40L says no registered ... which leads to one result ($55, refurbished) on newegg.

That seems iffy. Would I be better off:
  • getting this memory?
  • giving up ECC?
  • getting less capacity?

I recently upgraded because my freenas was stuck on 8.3 or something on an N40L. I installed the bios hack linked to on the n40l wiki to enable full speed eSATA and went from 8gb to 16GB. I picked up the samsung ECC memory on ebay for $70 for 3 sticks of 8GB (used the spare in a C204 server board). I honestly think ebay is the way to go for ECC memory if you don't mind spending a little time testing it. Here's some for ~$32 a stick:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/For-Samsun...-5/254413505994
I can't speak for that seller specifically being good, but buying used seems like the way to go.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





DizzyBum posted:

Thanks, this is exactly what I needed to know! I would rather get something up and running with little hassle (especially if it's quiet and lower-power), so I'll likely do the first option and then save the project for another time.

Funny enough, I instantly wished this wasn't the case. Picked up a cheap 8TB SAS drive on eBay since I'm out of spares. Arrived today, but when I picked it up, I got the ever so un-fun sensation of a drive sliding around in cardboard. Seller used those plastic end caps, but in a box way too big so there was nothing holding them on. USB SAS adapters apparently exist, but they're hellishly expensive.

I'm still going to test the drive before I return it, but that means a minor road trip and dealing with pandemic protocol. It was literally just shipped across town so maybe there's hope.

CommieGIR
Aug 22, 2006

If Godzilla can do it, you know I can deliver!

Pillbug

https://twitter.com/arstechnica/sta...9854307328?s=20

SwissArmyDruid
Feb 14, 2014



You know, it used to be that I wouldn't ever touch a Seagate drive, having had a number of them die in very short order, circa.... I want to say, 2005ish. I used almost exclusive Maxtors, and then WDs when Maxtor got bought out, but now? Man, WD is starting to give me a reason to reconsider the Seagate fatwa.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



Fallen Rib

SwissArmyDruid posted:

You know, it used to be that I wouldn't ever touch a Seagate drive, having had a number of them die in very short order, circa.... I want to say, 2005ish. I used almost exclusive Maxtors, and then WDs when Maxtor got bought out, but now? Man, WD is starting to give me a reason to reconsider the Seagate fatwa.

They know they've got the market cornered, so they're just loving everyone over and thinking it won't cost them market-share. Short-term gains over long-term brand loyalty, I guess.

cr0y
Mar 24, 2005

IRONKNUCKLE PERMBANNED! READ HERE


Oh man I forgot about Maxtor. poo poo used to be my jam.

SwissArmyDruid
Feb 14, 2014



sharkytm posted:

They know they've got the market cornered, so they're just loving everyone over and thinking it won't cost them market-share. Short-term gains over long-term brand loyalty, I guess.

Maybe this is the push I need to go entirely flash.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



Fallen Rib

cr0y posted:

Oh man I forgot about Maxtor. poo poo used to be my jam.

Remember Connor? I do.
Quantum? I think I have a BigFoot around somewhere, one of the BIG ones... I think the capacity was like 4.2GB.

Flipperwaldt
Nov 11, 2011

Won't somebody think of the starving hamsters in China?



I had a Quantum Bigfoot in a computer with a power supply that couldn't get it spinning. Luckily you could just slam the computer case down and it would start!

Krakkles
May 5, 2003

like and subscribe for more passive-aggressive roadway bullshit adventure in Chigcao

Paul MaudDib posted:

16GB is not excessive especially if you get into running applications/jails on your fileserver too.

https://n40l.fandom.com/wiki/Memory

you probably need a 2x8 GB kit, not just a single 16GB stick. I don't see anyone else confirming single 16GB sticks as working properly.

this is where I'd start: https://pcpartpicker.com/products/m...1,16384002&t=11

it looks like at this point none of the first-party stores (adorama, newegg, sold by amazon, etc) still carry anything that old but there's nothing wrong with the third party vendors if their reviews are OK.

Rexxed posted:

I recently upgraded because my freenas was stuck on 8.3 or something on an N40L. I installed the bios hack linked to on the n40l wiki to enable full speed eSATA and went from 8gb to 16GB. I picked up the samsung ECC memory on ebay for $70 for 3 sticks of 8GB (used the spare in a C204 server board). I honestly think ebay is the way to go for ECC memory if you don't mind spending a little time testing it. Here's some for ~$32 a stick:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/For-Samsun...-5/254413505994
I can't speak for that seller specifically being good, but buying used seems like the way to go.
Thanks for the recommendations! I checked out a few of the listings on pcpartspicker, but ended up settling on that ebay samsung listing. The ones I was finding via PCPP were all part numbers that definitely weren't listed, the ebay looks plausible (there's a similar Samsung listing, but ebay doesn't list the part number). Fingers crossed, but I appreciate y'all either way.

cr0y
Mar 24, 2005

IRONKNUCKLE PERMBANNED! READ HERE


Is it a terrible idea to open a random SSH port to the internet to allow my family's computers to backup to it via Duplicati/some other backup client? I have gobs of storage laying around on a server of mine and would like to get my family's data protected without them getting looped into some monthly pay service.

My security logic is:
Use a non-standard port
Data would be encrypted client side
SSH user would be locked into a single directory and be non-root and likely not even have a shell
....?
profit

Matt Zerella
Oct 7, 2002


cr0y posted:

Is it a terrible idea to open a random SSH port to the internet to allow my family's computers to backup to it via Duplicati/some other backup client? I have gobs of storage laying around on a server of mine and would like to get my family's data protected without them getting looped into some monthly pay service.

My security logic is:
Use a non-standard port
Data would be encrypted client side
SSH user would be locked into a single directory and be non-root and likely not even have a shell
....?
profit

Disable password login, key authentication only, set up fail2ban.

cr0y
Mar 24, 2005

IRONKNUCKLE PERMBANNED! READ HERE


Matt Zerella posted:

Disable password login, key authentication only, set up fail2ban.

Ya also that, one thing I never understood is why are public keys better than passwords? Assuming it's a good password aren't they cryptographically equivalent?

DrDork
Dec 29, 2003
commanding officer of the Army of Dorkness

cr0y posted:

Ya also that, one thing I never understood is why are public keys better than passwords? Assuming it's a good password aren't they cryptographically equivalent?

A long password can, indeed, have a higher cryptographic strength than a short / weak certificate.

Thing is, unless you're using a password manager to generate long, complex, random passwords, basically any password a human is capable of remembering is hilariously weak by comparison. If it's for family members (whom we will assume are not Security Engineers or other people unusually interested in their data's protection), anything they can bother to remember is also very likely to be reused, or reused with slight modification, on other accounts, massively increasing the risk of compromise.

From the other end, while many attackers are more than happy to sit there and pound away at anything they find that will let them attempt to submit passwords, basically none are going to bother generating a billion certs to submit on the incredibly unlikely chance that they manage to duplicate one. They see password login is disabled and gently caress off to the next guy with an open port.

I mean, in the end, is it likely that anyone is going to really care enough to try to hack your family server? Probably not. But when you can set up a certificate that will mean they don't have to remember anything and eliminates reuse concerns, why not? It's super easy to do, after all.

cr0y
Mar 24, 2005

IRONKNUCKLE PERMBANNED! READ HERE


That's really good reasoning, and no I am not dumb enough to let my family pick any of the passwords for SSH or the client side crypto. I'd be managing the setup, so ya I should probably just do certs.

I am still in the pondering phase, anything else I might want to consider other than SSH? It just seemed like the least hassle, spin up a VM, give it storage from my array and isolate it as much as I can from anything else on my network since I don't want to make my family members end points on my VPN.

cr0y fucked around with this message at 04:05 on Sep 11, 2020

H110Hawk
Dec 28, 2006


Ssh is the gold standard on the internet. Passwords are sent in plaintext across the pre-encrypted wire. Keys are never sent across the wire. Why tell the server your password when you can tell the server the signature of the nonce they send over encrypted with your public key? (my recollection of the process is vague at best.) Remember you tell every website your password every time you login. Ew.

Do not leave password authentication enabled. Disable root login. In fact only allow your one user to login. Verify that user does not have a password, does not have sudo access, is not in the wheel group, and is chroot'd into their own little prison. Fail2ban is great and should be used. I wouldn't bother with alternate ports.

Want to go further? Ssh supports key CA's for issuing them, and encoding the exact command a key is allowed to run. "ssh -i backup.key user@host" is all you need to do then.

H110Hawk fucked around with this message at 04:54 on Sep 11, 2020

EVIL Gibson
Mar 23, 2001

Internet of Things is just someone else's computer that people can't help attaching cameras and door locks to!


Switchblade Switcharoo

H110Hawk posted:

Ssh is the gold standard on the internet. Passwords are sent in plaintext across the pre-encrypted wire.

Passwords are transmitted in plaintext only when the client/server handshake is done and the encrypted pipe has been set up. People sniffing the network would see normal encrypted traffic.

I am only pointing it out so people don't think SSH does the same stuff like telnet where everything is plaintext.

Kingnothing
Aug 2, 2007

Domo Arigato, Archer Roboto


Does anyone have any suggestions for a non-raid compatible SAS or Sata controller that supports PCI-e x4? I was set on buying a 9207-8i or a consolation h310 but they're both x8 cards and I only have 1 x4 slot on my board.

Probably be hooking up 3 drives for now (all spinners), but I'd really like something that supports 8 like the 9207-8i

Buff Hardback
Jun 11, 2019


Kingnothing posted:

Does anyone have any suggestions for a non-raid compatible SAS or Sata controller that supports PCI-e x4? I was set on buying a 9207-8i or a consolation h310 but they're both x8 cards and I only have 1 x4 slot on my board.

Probably be hooking up 3 drives for now (all spinners), but I'd really like something that supports 8 like the 9207-8i

It looks like they don't really make SAS controllers at x4, and only a few SATA cards at x4 and those are only two slots. Is your x4 an open slot? If it is you can slot in an x8 card, it'll just have half the lanes available

Kingnothing
Aug 2, 2007

Domo Arigato, Archer Roboto


Buff Hardback posted:

It looks like they don't really make SAS controllers at x4, and only a few SATA cards at x4 and those are only two slots. Is your x4 an open slot? If it is you can slot in an x8 card, it'll just have half the lanes available

My 4x is an open slot. What negative effects would that have?

My board https://www.asus.com/us/Motherboards/MAXIMUS-VIII-GENE/

Kingnothing fucked around with this message at 05:55 on Sep 11, 2020

Buff Hardback
Jun 11, 2019


Kingnothing posted:

My 4x is an open slot. What negative effects would that have?
Not much. x4 is 7876MB/s max bandwidth, SATA3/SAS2 is 6Gbit (so 750MB/s) absolute max, but spinning rust really only maxes out at ~200MB/s on a good day.

Hard drives are really really really slow when compared to the rest of a computer

Kingnothing
Aug 2, 2007

Domo Arigato, Archer Roboto


Buff Hardback posted:

Not much. x4 is 7876MB/s max bandwidth, SATA3/SAS2 is 6Gbit (so 750MB/s) absolute max, but spinning rust really only maxes out at ~200MB/s on a good day.

Hard drives are really really really slow when compared to the rest of a computer


So I can basically just buy an h310 and let it hang out the edge of the 4x without much issue? And all8 ports will work as expected?

Thanks for the help

Buff Hardback
Jun 11, 2019


Kingnothing posted:

So I can basically just buy an h310 and let it hang out the edge of the 4x without much issue? And all8 ports will work as expected?

Thanks for the help

pretty much yeah. The LSI SAS2008 is the chipset that runs like every single SAS2 card from 2008-2013 while it was relevant. Also remember that 3 drives will connect to a single SFF8087 on the card, and if you're feeling really bold (well you don't really have any more room on that motherboard [without doing the janky mining card adapters]), you can run 8 drives off that single card, and if you instead plugged both SFF8087s into a SAS expander you'd end up with 24 drives available through one SAS controller

Crunchy Black
Oct 24, 2017

CASTOR: Uh, it was all fine and you don't remember?
VINDMAN: No, it was bad and I do remember.




Kingnothing posted:

So I can basically just buy an h310 and let it hang out the edge of the 4x without much issue? And all8 ports will work as expected?

Thanks for the help

Yes, electrically, all your ports will be fine. You won't be pegging your bandwidth at all.

Buff Hardback
Jun 11, 2019


Also just to make it clear, other than port differences (external versus internal/positioning on the card) and firmware, there's no difference between the perc h310 and any of the LSI SAS 92xx-yy cards, so it kinda boils to whichever is cheapest (and if you don't feel like flashing the IT firmware whichever is cheapest and pre-flashed)

(i'm rusty on my SAS cards i haven't picked one in a while so correct me if i'm wrong)

Kingnothing
Aug 2, 2007

Domo Arigato, Archer Roboto


Buff Hardback posted:

pretty much yeah. The LSI SAS2008 is the chipset that runs like every single SAS2 card from 2008-2013 while it was relevant. Also remember that 3 drives will connect to a single SFF8087 on the card, and if you're feeling really bold (well you don't really have any more room on that motherboard [without doing the janky mining card adapters]), you can run 8 drives off that single card, and if you instead plugged both SFF8087s into a SAS expander you'd end up with 24 drives available through one SAS controller

24 is alotta drives

I thought it was 4 drives per SFF8087 not 3? All the breakout cables seem to have 4 SATA connectors.

Speaking of breakout cables, should I just buy whateverís cheap? Or is the cheap stuff riddled with poo poo and should I roll with a known brand?

Buff Hardback
Jun 11, 2019


Kingnothing posted:

24 is alotta drives

I thought it was 4 drives per SFF8087 not 3? All the breakout cables seem to have 4 SATA connectors.

Speaking of breakout cables, should I just buy whateverís cheap? Or is the cheap stuff riddled with poo poo and should I roll with a known brand?

Sorry, I was just working off your 3 spinners count.

The CableCreation brand on Amazon is pretty good. Also this is when I'd jump in with another recommendation: if you ever plan on buying SAS drives (benefits: cheaper for a given size, cons: can't be spun down if thats something you care about) getting SFF8087 to SFF8482 cables is better than 8087 to SATA, as SAS connectors will happily plug into SATA drives, but not the other way around.

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Kingnothing
Aug 2, 2007

Domo Arigato, Archer Roboto


Buff Hardback posted:

Sorry, I was just working off your 3 spinners count.

The CableCreation brand on Amazon is pretty good. Also this is when I'd jump in with another recommendation: if you ever plan on buying SAS drives (benefits: cheaper for a given size, cons: can't be spun down if thats something you care about) getting SFF8087 to SFF8482 cables is better than 8087 to SATA, as SAS connectors will happily plug into SATA drives, but not the other way around.

Thanks for all the help. I havenít messed with sata PCI-e before or SAS so this has all been incredibly helpful.

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