Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us $3,400 per month for bandwidth bills alone, and since we don't believe in shoving popup ads to our registered users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
«15 »
  • Post
  • Reply
Guinness
Sep 15, 2004



When I was 18, the first car I bought and owned on my own (as opposed to driving my parents old car) was a 1990 E34 535i with a 5-speed. Ever since I've been completely converted to the BMW cult.

My E34 was an amazing car. The interior felt like it was designed in 2000, not 1988, and it drove fantastically. The M30 is an amazing engine, and the car was largely problem free except for a few little tiny problems. I actually sold it to my brother over a year ago and it still is running great for him, and he loves it as much as I did (maybe even more).



I love my current car (NA Miata), too, but I'll most definitely be back into a BMW in due time. My next car will almost certainly be an E46 330Ci or a Z4 3.0si (or a Boxster ), depending on my needs and budget in a few years. There just really is very little that compares to a BMW for all-around performance and enjoyment.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Guinness
Sep 15, 2004



mazachan posted:

Yeah, pretty much for a little bit more than the ZHP coupe, you can get the M3. I bought my ZHP sedan because I needed the 4 doors. But man, that thing is so much fun to drive.

Although, at least theoretically, the ZHP coupe should be cheaper to operate in the long run. Purchase price isn't necessarily the only cost to base a decision off of.

Guinness
Sep 15, 2004



Russian Bear posted:

I've been trying to figure this out for a while and haven't come up with anything, but what does "WOT" stand for?

Wide-open throttle. Flooring it, if you will.

Guinness
Sep 15, 2004



Admirable Gusto posted:

Has anyone heard anything lately about the rumored Z2?

(Totally made-up artist rendering from AutoBild attached.)

What exactly would the market segment of a Z2 be? The Z4 3.0i already starts as low as 36k, and I can't really imagine BMW starting a new roadster significantly below that, especially since it would be barging in to the S2000, Solstice, Sky, and Miata territory (the upper trims, at least).

If the rumors are true then it doesn't bother me, as more available cars is always a good thing - especially roadsters. But I just don't know that I see the market segment the Z2 would appeal to.

Guinness
Sep 15, 2004



buildmyrigdotcom posted:

I think I've decided I'm going to get an early to mid 90's BMW as a daily driver since they seem to have a ridiculously long lifespan. Do the guys in this thread find these older models in great shape or did you have to put a lot of work into beat up ones? I'm looking at stuff for under 5k.

For under 5k you could get a running E34 or E36 in decent to good shape. It likely will not be "perfect", but 5k should get you a pretty all-around solid car.

The E34 in particular is one of BMW's most well built cars ever, and is dead reliable with a straight six. The V8 models (530i and 540i) are more finicky and maintenance intensive. I had a 535i 5-speed and it was a great car. For a daily driver though I'd recommend a 92+ 525i because the updated M50 2.5L has power approaching that of the M30 3.5L, but with better fuel economy. The M20 (89-92 525s) is a dog of an engine in the 3400 pound E34. If you can sacrifice a couple mpg and slightly lesser handling, the E34 is a supremely comfortable car. It handles amazingly well, especially considering its size.

The E36 is an all around decent car, and will handle a bit better than an E34, but you will immediately notice a large gap in general build quality. E36s are pretty cheap feeling in my opinion, which may or may not matter to you. A 325i or 328i would make a pretty quick daily driver that is okay on gas. Avoid the 318i though, it's slow as balls.

Guinness fucked around with this message at 02:21 on Apr 16, 2008

Guinness
Sep 15, 2004



ynotony posted:

Just to offer another opinion, an E34 interior was born in 1987, and the E36 interior was born in 1992. I drive an '94 E36 and the inside is much more modern feeling than my friend's '95 E34 and I like it better. The E36 also stopped production in 1999 so it looks newer on the outside as well.

Really? I think that the E34 interior feels more modern and sophisticated. Difference of opinion, I guess!

But both certainly feel years ahead of their domestic and Japanese contemporaries.

Guinness fucked around with this message at 03:59 on Apr 16, 2008

Guinness
Sep 15, 2004



I'm so loving happy they got rid of the downright hideous chrome bit on top of the kidneys on the E90 sedans that is not even on the grille, but a separate piece on the hood. The coupe-style kidneys are a thousand times better. It pains me to see so many E90s with their front-end aesthetics completely ruined by that stupid trim.


^^ Bad. What on earth were they thinking.

Also, I'm really digging the embossed "stripe" down the hood. Reminds me of older style BMWs that had similar styling cues.

Guinness
Sep 15, 2004



OMG Spor posted:

And right now I'm looking to buy an E30 or E36, but I don't know how reliable E30's are. Anyone?

No less reliable than most any other 20+ year old car out there. If you aren't a DIY mechanic I would stay pretty far away from one, though, or any 20+ year old car for that matter.

But if you are a DIYer, an E30, or any oldish BMW, can be an extremely rewarding car. Repairs are generally pretty straightforward, parts are still easy to come by and are pretty affordable online, and there's a huge enthusiast following with tons of info, documentation, and part swapping. It might be marginally more expensive than owning a 1988 Honda Accord, but it will be so, so, so much more fun.

The straight six motors and manual transmissions and associated drivetrain components (by far the most expensive bits on the car) are pretty drat resilient, but they do require sticking to the maintenance schedule, and other little minor things in the car will likely need to be addressed like electric poo poo from time to time (or the infamous E36 cooling system). They aren't unreliable by any means, but don't expect it to never break or to never have weird little issues. Most of the time whatever breaks won't strand you, so you can almost always drive it home to the comfort of your own driveway to work on it. And one thing in particular about BMWs is that when they break they usually break in very predictable ways, so 95% of problems you might have on your car have been had by tons of other people who have talked about it and documented it online. This is a godsend compared to something like a Mk.IV Volkswagen loaded with shoddy electrics with tons of unpredictable and hard to reproduce failures.

Guinness fucked around with this message at 06:48 on Apr 16, 2008

Guinness
Sep 15, 2004



buildmyrigdotcom posted:

Thanks for this post, it was very useful. I looked up the numbering system and it all makes a lot more sense now.

Yeah, once you get used to it it's a much better method to refer to the specific chassis than saying "My 3rd generation 5-series with the 2.5L motor" or similar. Anyone who's into BMWs will know exactly what you're referring to right away. I don't know all the beginning and end years of all the generations, but when someone says E28 or E46 I know exactly what chassis they're referring to. I don't keep up on all of the chassis codes, just the common ones (3, 5, and 7 series). There's only a handful to remember that way. Who gives a poo poo about the X3 or X5.

quote:

I think I'm going to try to find a two door version - I'm only seeing E36 coupes, though.

Yeah, the E30 and E36 coupes are designated as "is" models (e.g. 328is). Not all ads will necessarily make the distinction, though, so it's good to just search for 325, or 3-series, for example.

quote:

Was there an E34 coupe, too?

No, the E34, and all 5-series cars, only came in sedan and wagon forms.

As a sidenote, however, the 6-series has been largely/entirely based off its contemporary 5-series counterpart, making it essentially a 5-series coupe. However, there was no 6-series in the E34 or E39 eras.

quote:

I think I'm probably going to stick with the E36 - I like the looks better.

Can't fault you for that. The 3-series is sportier than the 5-series, and if you're looking for a coupe then it's a no-brainer. Personally I prefer the appearance of the E34 to the E36, but opinions are like assholes.

quote:

Finally, what's with all the leather seats? Was there no cloth option? How hard is it to find some seats from other cars (BMW or not) and transplant them in?

In the USA, BMW is marketed as an exclusively premium brand. Premium brand = leather interiors. Again, I suppose it's personal preference, but leather seats are SO much nicer than cloth seats, and hold up so much nicer if taken care of. The leather seats in my 1990 535i were nearly pristine.

Guinness fucked around with this message at 08:01 on Apr 16, 2008

Guinness
Sep 15, 2004



Adnuo posted:

Basically, I'm wondering what the chances are that the clutch could be going out in a 56,000 mile off-lease 330i, what the signs of a clutch going out would be, and could possibly give some insight as to what is involved in replacing the clutch - cost of parts, likelihood if DIY-ability. Almost out for the summer and need to decide whether to add the cost of a clutch to my mental list of costs.

56,000 miles is definitely within the realm of possibility for a worn out clutch, especially on a sporty car that has a questionable history of how it was driven.

The usual method of testing the slippage of a clutch is to drive about 25-30mph, then shift into your highest gear (5th, 6th, whatever). Now floor the accelerator. If your engine speed starts rising but your vehicle speed does not, congrats, your clutch is on its way out.

Guinness
Sep 15, 2004



Pissingintowind posted:

Really? My M3 is on the stock clutch at ~89,000. I learned to drive on this car, as have 2 other people, and it is only beginning to slip.

Don't get me wrong, a clutch can last a long rear end time. My Miata is on the stock clutch at 76k, my old 535i was on the stock clutch at 130k, and my dad's '91 Nissan truck is on the stock clutch at 180k (which I and my brother learned on). If you're nice to it, a clutch can last a very long time, especially in something that isn't too exotic.

Learning to drive on a car doesn't necessarily kill the clutch. But driving like a dickhead doing 4000rpm clutch dumps and/or just generally slipping the clutch too often certainly does. With a freshly out-of-lease vehicle with 56,000 miles on it I wouldn't be surprised at all if the previous owner treated it like a rental car... since to him that's what it basically was.

Guinness fucked around with this message at 08:44 on Apr 18, 2008

Guinness
Sep 15, 2004



wolrah posted:

Not as impressive as Daveh's dad's M3, but I got rid of my stock tail lights and installed some M3-style LED units today.

Now you need to get rid of the Carmax sticker and license plate frame. That should have been your first order of business. Those things are tacky as hell.

Guinness
Sep 15, 2004



rope kid posted:

OWNED BMW MOBILE TRADITION!!!

http://www.madison.com/tct/entertai...7staging/298673

The Article posted:

Under the hood is the first-ever BMW car engine -- a four-cylinder, 15-horsepower, 743-liter piece of heaven that is as basic as engines can get. The fan has just two blades and the fan belt is leather. There is no fuel pump; instead, there is a gravity feed that drips gas to the carburetor.



Surely they mean 743cc?

Guinness
Sep 15, 2004



gjh posted:

The blues for me can be OK in the right shade and how it's done. You can get two tone seats done through the Individual program and that really makes it look nice. For instance these two cars have the same individual blue interior (Estoril Blue)... the first one is overkill, the second is fantasic. But maybe it's just me.

And maybe it's just me, but blue like that doesn't belong in any car interior ever, especially a BMW. Both are absolutely vomit-inducing. Blech.

Guinness
Sep 15, 2004



Beware: BMWCCA pretty much forbids convertibles at their track events, last I checked. Even if you install a rollbar. If you install a rollbar, sometimes they'll let you on.

As much as I love convertibles for the road (I own one), for a track car get a solid roof. It'll save you a lot of headache.

Edit: Googled a bit, and it seems like BMWCCA is usually okay with convertibles only if you install a good roll bar. But even still, sometimes they will outright forbid convertibles.

Guinness fucked around with this message at 20:11 on Aug 14, 2008

Guinness
Sep 15, 2004



Das Volk posted:

Why are 7 series so cheap? you'd think a car that expensive from 8 or 9 years ago would be worth a little more.

1) Very expensive to maintain, and lots of little things go wrong. They have a pretty bad reputation reliability wise. If you're comfortable doing your own work, much of this can be negated, however, but most 7-series owners are the kind who drop it off at the dealership for every little thing.

2) Most of the people looking to drive a large German luxury sedan are the kind of people who want a brand new one - and they will lease it. Very few people actually buy a new 7-series since once they are out of warranty they are a nightmare.

3) Even though you can buy a 10 year old for $10k doesn't mean parts will cost the same as $10k car. Parts will still cost what they would as if it were still a $70k car.

Guinness
Sep 15, 2004



I think the black wheels would look pretty silly unless you black out the rest of the car.

Guinness
Sep 15, 2004



bigmike posted:

I'm about to pull the trigger on an 06 325i (e90) for about $28k Canadian. For anywhere between $3k-$7k more I can get an 02-05 M3 (e46). Is this a jump I should consider? My buddy who has 3 series similarly regretted not making that same decision to get an M3. He also said, "The thing about power is that once you get a taste of it, you just want more." Is dual zone climate control standard on the 02-05 M3's? Is there a site to compare all the spec/packages available for past BMW's?

Expect to pay 2-3 times more in maintenance costs to keep up the M3 over the 325i.

If you're comfortable with that, then by all means get an M3.

If you want to find a happy medium between the relatively slow 325i and relatively fast M3, an E46 330i or E90 328i/330i will be quite a bit snappier and will have pretty much the same maintenance costs. I would actually skip the 325i all together and get either a 330i or a facelifted 328i. The E90 325i is pretty underwhelming.

If I were going to buy a used less than 5 year old used 3-series right now, it would be a 2004 E46 330Ci with the ZHP package. It's a bit like a junior M3 without the BMW M tax.

Guinness
Sep 15, 2004



Arwox posted:

What makes you say that? Is it the fact that the rigid suspension tends to vibrate things apart more? or is the car in general just needier than a non M bmw?

It's the "M tax". It's primarily in parts cost and also that maintenance intervals will be slightly shorter as a performance car will wear through wear items (tires, brakes, clutch, etc.) a bit quicker if you're driving it like it was designed to be.

The running joke is that the number behind the "M" in any given BMW is the maintenance multiplier over its non-M counterpart. So an M3 would be 3x as expensive to maintain over a regular 3, an M5 would be 5x more than a regular 5. Of course this is a joke and a bit hyperbolic, but there is a kernel of truth to it as well.

The USDM E36 M3 isn't really that much of a screamer, and shouldn't be too ridiculous to keep up. E36s are also pretty straightforward to work on - the huge enthusiast following has created a million DIY How-Tos online, and the Bentley manuals for BMWs are fantastic compared to a Hanes/Chilton manual.

Maintenance costs can be severely reduced if you do your own wrenching, especially on the more routine things. Ordering parts online and doing maintenance in your own driveway will save you an enormous amount of money (true for any car, but especially cars. Even if you're not up to the task of valve adjustments or what have you, just changing your own fluids, brakes, filters, etc. will save you a tidy sum - and give you the skills and confidence to tackle bigger issues as they arise.


Rough roads are going to be hard on any car's suspension. A bit moreso on super stiff set ups, but as long as you try not to hit any huge potholes I wouldn't worry about it too much. I know it feels like you're abusing the thing, but it's just the nature of being able to feel every little bump. Every car's suspension has to deal with it, but the softer ones just make it less obvious.

Guinness fucked around with this message at 00:24 on Oct 26, 2008

Guinness
Sep 15, 2004



Arwox posted:

Thanks for the replies gentlemen, and after much pondering i think im gonna keep her. For all the worrying i do about it, every so often i get this extreme feeling of after taking it on an especially aggressive drive. And i think the extra work/money im gonna be putting into it will be well worth it just for those moments.

Congrats, you're what we call an "enthusiast".

Guinness
Sep 15, 2004



kimbo305 posted:

Didn't it get concluded in some other thread that all wheels are lug centric and don't need hub centering to fit correctly? I think it was oxbrain that said so.

From my own personal experience with swapping BMW wheels, I have to disagree with this. I put some Style 25s from an E39 onto my E34 without hubcentric rings, and I would get some pretty significant vibrations above 80-85mph. I ordered some $15 hubcenric rings from eBay, threw them on to fill the hub bore gap, and the vibration is entirely gone. Smooth as butter at all speeds.

Guinness
Sep 15, 2004



Sterndotstern posted:

I need to get $6k for it to not lose money, but given how well maintained it is, that should be doable.

Right guys? Right?

If I were in the market I would buy it for $6k easily if it's as good as you say.

Guinness
Sep 15, 2004



Aquila posted:

So a coworker is interested in the X6 for some reason. I've heard they have atrocious reliability or something, anyone have any info on this? I'm trying to push him towards and M3 or S5 instead.

Haven't they only been on the market for like less than a month. Isn't it a little early to start declaring them atrociously unreliable?

Guinness
Sep 15, 2004



I think they'll look A LOT better once they are actually on the car and not standing next to it. The perspective of that picture is all sorts of hosed up and makes them look retarded.

They are indeed on the needlessly large side, but I've definitely seen a lot worse. At least it's an E46 with 19s and not an E36 or something like that. They certainly aren't my taste with how "LOOK AT ME" they are, but hey it's not my car.

Guinness
Sep 15, 2004



Okay those actually look pretty good. Better than I thought they would, in fact. Proper perspective makes a world of difference.

Guinness
Sep 15, 2004



I wouldn't touch it without getting a full maintenance record and documentation of the supercharger parts/install.

The last thing you want to do is buy some old guy's basketcase supercharger project.

On the other hand, it's very possible that it was well done. If that's the case, he shouldn't have a hard time proving it with receipts and documentation if he did it himself, or the work orders if he paid a shop.

Guinness
Sep 15, 2004



Look in the owner's manual, put in whatever it says to.

Guinness
Sep 15, 2004



Is the AWD system on the E46 any good? What's it reputation for reliability?

I'm starting to think about replacing my Miata with a good mountain car for all my outdoor hobbies, and I'm looking for something capable on long, crappy dirt forest roads and snowy mountain passes, but that is still fun to drive and handles well (coming from a Miata, so my standards are high). The obvious contender is a WRX, but I want to consider other (nicer) options as well. It's not going to be for hardcore rallying or anything like that. The full-time 38/62 power distribution sounds promising on paper, but I haven't driven one myself.

I had an E34 several years ago so I'm well acquainted with BMWs in general, and I know a fair amount about E46s in general, too. But I don't know much about the AWD system, if it's actually any good, or if it's a maintenance/reliability nightmare.

Guinness fucked around with this message at 22:01 on Feb 10, 2011

Guinness
Sep 15, 2004



I think I'm starting to settle on what I want my upcoming new-used car to be, after much painful deliberating: an E46 330 with a manual (sedan or coupe, just depends on the best specimen I can find). I miss my old E34 535i, and it's time to get back into a BMW.

I'm somewhat well acquainted with E46s, and BMWs in general, but now I'm trying to really narrow down what I'm looking for to specific years/trims, as well as any specific years to avoid. Fortunately the E46 seems like the best community-documented car out there. Regardless of what I pick up, I plan on getting it PPI'd by one of the best German shops in town (Fat City in Seattle, great guys in my experience) and expecting to put some coin into it right off the bat in getting things like bushings, mounts, and fluids up to snuff, unless I find the perfect meticulously maintained 1-owner car (lol yeah right).

In a perfect world, I'd find a loaded ~2005 330i/Ci with less than 60k miles, but I'm willing to look at older models since the price seems to drop off significantly for an 01-02.

One thing I've read about with the early 2001 330s is that BMW overboosted the power steering, owners complained about it, and they dialed it back down in mid year 2001. They previously offered to retrofit the steering with the less-boosted system, but of course no longer do that. If I bought a 2001 with the overboosted steering, what all would I be looking at to do the retrofit as far as parts/price?

The other thing I've been bouncing around is consideration of the 330xi, since I will be using this car for going skiing and backpacking. But I've read the associated suspension changes for the 330xi really ruined the car's driving feel. The fully mechanical permanent system sounds kind of neat, but what do I know. Can anyone with experience on the E46 AWD system weigh in on the issue?

Any other E46 buying tips and tricks? Any links to good comprehensive buyer's guides?

Guinness
Sep 15, 2004



tesko.pk posted:

If it was me, buying an E46 all over again, I'd be after a late 2003 330ci w/ 6spd, Nav, Sport, and cold weather package. Since, to be honest, the facelift coupe didn't improve the looks at all for me.

Yeah, the e46 face lift, especially on the coupes, doesn't matter that much to me. That's kind of why I'm considering going as far back as 2001 and saving some cash. Seriously, 01-02s seem to have asking prices almost half that of 04-05s. Also, I actually don't really want the navigation system. It's something that I would never update the maps for ($$$), and also something I just mostly would never use. If it happens to be in the perfect car I find, then cool I guess, but otherwise I'd slightly prefer to not have it. It's just one more expensive thing to break. Though speaking of e46 nav, is it all integrated with the HVAC and stereo stuff? If it is, then I definitely don't want it.

And thank you for the tips and link. I'm going to continuing reading and researching, and keeping an eye out for good cars to check out. Unfortunately, my requirements of manual trans, sport+cold packages, and preferably less than ~75k miles seems to eliminate about 95% of the market. I also want to buy pretty local so I can get the reputable German shop to run any prospect through a PPI, so no one-way flights for me.

At least I'm in no rush to buy.

Guinness fucked around with this message at 17:45 on Apr 13, 2011

Guinness
Sep 15, 2004



tesko.pk posted:

I would definitely stick with 02-03 model years, the early cars with M52 engines are more problematic. Oh, and;

Don't all the 330s use the M54? Did they change something in 2002 to make it more reliable?

quote:

http://seattle.craigslist.org/see/cto/2321720171.html
140k but the price is right.

325, gaudy chrome 18" wheels (and expensive replacing tires that size), and 140k miles. Nah. I've seen some fairly clean looking 01-02 330s in the 10-13k range, but so far none of them have met all my requirements. Appreciate the thought, though.

Guinness
Sep 15, 2004



heat posted:



I'll stick with Google Maps/Navigation on my phone, holy poo poo.

Ayup. I'm not one of those people that has to have their GPS unit dictate their every turn. A quick glance at a map on my phone before heading out is usually enough if I'm going somewhere I don't know. On the odd occasion I get lost or turned around, a one minute pitstop with my phone sorts that out right quick. Paying hundreds of dollars for a third party nav system, let alone thousands for a proprietary, expensive-to-update factory nav is ridiculous to me.

Guinness
Sep 15, 2004



About what's a 2004 330Ci, 6-speed manual, ~92k miles worth? Let's assume good but not showroom condition, and likely minimal records.

I'm thinking I'm going to go test drive one of that description, but without any real intent to buy yet. It's at some podunk potentially-shady dealer, so I don't feel guilty about it. I think it'd be a good benchmark for my E46 330 shopping.

Guinness
Sep 15, 2004



tesko.pk posted:

Depends on options, but ~13k or so. Private party with extensive maintenance records is the way to go IMO.

Excellent, that's about what I thought. And yeah, I'd love to buy private party with records. In fact, I mostly am planning on it. But I want to get out and test drive a couple different cars just for having some data points to compare against. For that, used lots are great.


tesko.pk posted:

Are you guys familiar with the Dynavin v5 unit? OEM fit and finish, DVD, USB, Bluetooth, 7" touchscreen, this is a full double-din head-unit we're talking about here.



Okay, I'll admit that looks pretty slick. Upon further reading, I might actually consider spending ~$600 on something like that.

Guinness
Sep 15, 2004



I've read a lot of problems with the high pressure fuel pumps on the N54 being a very problematic point on the engine, sometimes failing within only a few thousand miles of replacement. Last I heard, they were still replacing broken ones with the same flawed design, ensuring another failure down the road. I'm not too up on the subject though, so maybe someone else can chime in on the problem and the current status.

Guinness
Sep 15, 2004



I'm also looking at buying an E46, and all of my research and recommendations have indicated to avoid 323/328s and stick to 2002+ models with the much improved M54 and less-prone-to-failure rear subframe mounts.

Personally, I'm keeping an eye out for a clean, stock, loaded, relatively low miles mid-year 2003 or later 330Ci with a manual and some semblance of maintenance history. And preferably not in boring and ubiquitous silver.

Unfortunately that means I'm probably going to be looking for a while.

Guinness
Sep 15, 2004



wolrah posted:

For anyone interested in the Dynavin head units, apparently a limited production test run of Android devices has just started shipping.

Ok, as if I wasn't already thinking about picking up a Dynavin unit for my inevitable future E46, if the next version of it will be Android-based I'm sure as hell sold now. Super super cool.

Guinness
Sep 15, 2004



Any particular reason you're looking at the 323/325 (or at least that's the feeling I get reading your posts)? The 328/330 get virtually the same gas mileage, have a good chunk more power on tap, and tend to come more loaded on the options. Plus on the used market the price difference between a 325 and 330 isn't very large, barring ZHPs.

Not trolling, just curious is all.

Is that 325 you're looking at a one-owner car with all the records? If it is, I wouldn't let a couple hundred bucks keep you from buying it if it is as good of a specimen as it sounds. You can get a dime-sized dent pulled out for cheap at any decent detail shop.

Guinness
Sep 15, 2004



I've come across an interesting twist in my E46 330i/Ci hunt. A coworker of mine, who I trust a fair amount, runs a small used car dealership on the side, partially so he can rotate the cars he drives frequently for very little cost. This means that he has a dealer license and has access to dealer auctions, and has offered to give me access to auction listings and to buy one for me essentially at cost.

Of course the downside is I'd be getting a car at auction without any real test drive, inspection, probably little/no records, or face-to-face with the PO.

Assuming that one of the first things I'd do would be to take it to the most reputable independent German shop in town and get it inspected and freshened up with the money I'd be saving (potentially several thousand dollars), do you guys think it is worth the risk? I'm kind of on the fence about it and could use some input/experience. Anyone have any great/terrible stories of buying at auction? He's done the same process for a couple of my other coworkers (including an E90 328xi and an Audi S6), and they all seem to be pretty happy with their purchases.

Guinness fucked around with this message at 22:25 on May 4, 2011

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Guinness
Sep 15, 2004



Bank posted:

Awesome stuff.

Beautiful, thank you.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply
«15 »