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Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns






Elysium posted:

Lol, I thought it was pretty clear the guy looking at $200 saws on craigslist wasn't buying a $4900, 4900lb monster.
Honestly the splurge option is probably a better deal in terms of dollars per pound

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Mr. Mambold
Feb 13, 2011

Aha. Nice post.




Elysium posted:

Lol, I thought it was pretty clear the guy looking at $200 saws on craigslist wasn't buying a $4900, 4900lb monster.

goons

NomNomNom
Jul 20, 2008
Please Work Out

Good deal?
The included tools are worth that much by themselves right?

Woodworking tools - Lathe
https://washingtondc.craigslist.org...7123156909.html

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns






NomNomNom posted:

Good deal?
The included tools are worth that much by themselves right?

Woodworking tools - Lathe
https://washingtondc.craigslist.org...7123156909.html

It’s a decent deal. It’s probably a $150 set of tools, and the lathe looks fairly solid. Maybe more welded steel than cast iron, but should be fine for spindles and some smaller bowls. It looks like the motor is direct drive which I’m not wild on, but that one doesn’t look huge and in the way like some of them are.

JEEVES420
Feb 16, 2005

The world is a mess... and I just need to rule it

How does one buy a lathe and let it sit for 20y "never used" and not get a single amount of rust on it?

I don't know much about that lathe but if you want to get into turning its not a bad price to start. The tools are a good starter set that would run you about 150-200 alone.

Leperflesh
May 17, 2007







Smellrose

JEEVES420 posted:

How does one buy a lathe and let it sit for 20y "never used" and not get a single amount of rust on it?

A lot of these tools are packed/shipped at the factory with a thin layer of cosmoline or other gel-type preserving oil on the unprotected steel surfaces, and if it's never touched, it'll basically sit rust-free forever. Alternatively, just store it somewhere completely dry.

At that price I would totally pull the trigger on that lathe, as a first lathe to learn on, and then maybe in two to ten years if you're still lathing away and want more features, you can upgrade with no regrets.

coathat
May 21, 2007



You probably won't ever find a better deal than that

asmasm
Nov 26, 2013


Again, hardly woodworking but the mahogany is my favorite part. Network gear rack to get it all off of my office floor:

JEEVES420
Feb 16, 2005

The world is a mess... and I just need to rule it

Leperflesh posted:

A lot of these tools are packed/shipped at the factory with a thin layer of cosmoline or other gel-type preserving oil on the unprotected steel surfaces, and if it's never touched, it'll basically sit rust-free forever. Alternatively, just store it somewhere completely dry.

why would he unbox and clean it up it after 20y if he was just going to sell it though. I want his shop if that sat in there for 20y completely dry

Leperflesh
May 17, 2007







Smellrose

JEEVES420 posted:

why would he unbox and clean it up it after 20y if he was just going to sell it though. I want his shop if that sat in there for 20y completely dry

Lots of people live in like deserts and stuff. Nothing in my garage rusts really, and I'm not even in a desert.

Lots of people buy tools aspirationally but never use them. It's the same with exercise equipment.

Slugworth
Feb 18, 2001

If two grown men can't make a pervert happy for a few minutes in order to watch a film about zombies, then maybe we should all just move to Iran!


JEEVES420 posted:

why would he unbox and clean it up it after 20y if he was just going to sell it though. I want his shop if that sat in there for 20y completely dry
Where are you located about? Midwest here, pretty wide range of temps/humidity, and nothing in my garage just rusts. Not noticably at least.

Super Waffle
Sep 25, 2007

I'm a hermaphrodite and my parents (40K nerds) named me Slaanesh, THANKS MOM

Living in Florida, I've had tools rust the day after a applying a layer of wax

Olothreutes
Mar 31, 2007



I live in the desert southwest, which makes that table saw rust all the more impressive.

The junk collector
Aug 10, 2005
Hey do you want that motherboard?

Elysium posted:

Does this seem like a good deal? / Is this a decent saw?





Seconding that $200 is too much for that saw. I don't know where you are at but in Texas, Maryland, and Pennsylvania I could grab those frequently for $50-100


NomNomNom posted:

Good deal?
The included tools are worth that much by themselves right?

Woodworking tools - Lathe
https://washingtondc.craigslist.org...7123156909.html

That's actually the same lathe I have currently. It's a decent lathe from Craftsman in the 90s and worth about that price. The head is reversible for outboard turning and you can do a 12in bowl on it, bigger really, but I haven't tried.
It's 2HP max realized power so it's not as strong as you might think if you just read 2HP but you should guess that from the 110V outlet. Just let it come up to speed when you adjust it. Variable speed is about 400 to 2000 RPM by turn dial and it has a safety so you can't turn the lathe on unless the RPM is set to 0. 2 MT head and tail stock so it works with pretty much everything off the shelf. It should come with a pair of thin wrenches for the reatining/seperation nut on the drive head but it's not a huge deal if he doesn't have them. Craftsman also made a duplicator for it if you can find it for doing stuff like banister railings.

2 Warnings, it doesn't look like he has the outboard tool rest so you may have to make your own if you want to do large 10"+ bowls, and that is also the loudest lathe I've ever used. I was worried about the bearings the first time I turned it on but apparently the drive mechanism used in that model just sounds like that.

The Sorby tools are good quality and look like they've never been used (or at least never sharpened). They run about $100 new for that set so the whole shebang for $250 is pretty decent. The set is a bowl gouge, a spindle gouge, a round nose scraper, a parting tool, a roughing gouge, and an oval skew. Personally, I don't like that oval skew but everyone is different. If you've never run a lathe before I recommend getting a cup/safety drive for the head which run about $40 new. It'll make learning a skew so much nicer and actually has almost no downside. The drive in the lathe currently is the 4 prong spur drive that came with that model.

BrianBoitano
Nov 15, 2006

this is fine





Can someone help me unfuck myself? I bought the felt-type furniture pads and I wrecked some furniture with some help from PODS. A cherry-ish coffee table, a mahogany-ish end table, and a walnut-ish dining table.

1. Are the crayons + markers sets hot garbage like their price tag suggests? I hadn't had luck earlier but I wasn't being nearly as careful as this video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hyW_cjYi8P4
2. I'm thinking it would be even better with lacquer, yeah? I'm attracted to the idea of spray lacquer from a can, but I can be convinced otherwise.
3. Does the "fix wood dents with steam from an iron" thing work, especially with already-finished furniture? I will try on an inside of a leg first, I suppose.

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns






BrianBoitano posted:

Can someone help me unfuck myself? I bought the felt-type furniture pads and I wrecked some furniture with some help from PODS. A cherry-ish coffee table, a mahogany-ish end table, and a walnut-ish dining table.

1. Are the crayons + markers sets hot garbage like their price tag suggests? I hadn't had luck earlier but I wasn't being nearly as careful as this video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hyW_cjYi8P4
No, they work, and that video is a good intro. This is how most professional furniture touch up/repair is done. There's nothing super special about them vs a regular crayon/magic marker except that that they are in common wood tones and softer than a crayon. If you have art supplies that match, that works too, but you'll probably need to soften a crayon with a lighter or something so it's not so brittle and crumbly when you try to rub it in the crack. Look at the repair and touch up from a few different angles as you go-what looks perfect from directly overhead might look like poo poo from the side, and there's usually a compromise of getting it looking half decent from most angles but not perfect from any one.

Mohawk is a company that makes good touch up stuff but most anything is probably fine.

Epoxy putty or burn in is sometimes used instead of wax fill sticks and does give a harder, more durable result, but its not nearly as DIY friendly.

BrianBoitano posted:

2. I'm thinking it would be even better with lacquer, yeah? I'm attracted to the idea of spray lacquer from a can, but I can be convinced otherwise.
Yes and no. If you use a wax fill stick, lacquer won't stick to it very well. Sometimes you can lightly mist on a barrier coat of vinyl sealer and then scuff sand/lacquer over that, but it's still chancy. If you are just replacing color with a marker, lacquer is fine. You need to thoroughly clean the area you are going to spray with mineral spirits or naphtha to remove contaminants that can gently caress up the lacquer. Honestly a coat of good clear paste wax over top will do the same thing and is much easier. You are going to have to match the sheen of the repair/new lacquer to the old finish-usually this means rubbing the repair (and honestly the whole tabletop) lightly with 0000 steel wool. Rub with the grain.


BrianBoitano posted:

Can someone help me unfuck myself? I bought the felt-type furniture pads and I wrecked some furniture with some help from PODS. A cherry-ish coffee table, a mahogany-ish end table, and a walnut-ish dining table.
3. Does the "fix wood dents with steam from an iron" thing work, especially with already-finished furniture? I will try on an inside of a leg first, I suppose.
Yes it can remove the dents, but it also has a very good chance of severely loving up the finish. It's a trick best used on raw, unfinished wood. I wouldn't do it on a finished piece-just fill the scratch with a fill stick and level it.

Did the furniture pads leave marks or imprints in the finish, or is this all scratches and dents from not-enough pads? The marks furniture pads can leave on stuff in storage can be very difficult to remove. Post some pics if you can.

E for clarity

Kaiser Schnitzel fucked around with this message at 12:25 on May 15, 2020

Hasselblad
Dec 13, 2017
NRA shill who thinks homeless people would love to live in migrant border camps. Help me realize I am a bigoted piece of shit.


Suntan Boy posted:

Depends on whether you're trying to cut the concave or convex side, and what you're willing to do to your sled.

For the concave side, a piece of thickish square bar perpendicular to the blade, across the worst part of the cup, attached to the board with hand knobs should smoosh it down nicely.

For the convex side, the stubby end of a hold down clamp on each corner should flatten it out. The bar method above also works, but takes at least 2.

I like t-track in my jigs for this kind of clamping, be it aluminum, routered in, or a set of metal/hardwood bars inlaid with appropriate gap. Alternatively, you could just poke holes in the sled and countersink the underside as needed.

Concave dado at the end of the board. I considered having a clamp on the right side of the sled, but bridging the cut channel made me fearful of the stress I would be putting on that side of the sled, being attached solely by the “bridges” at both ends. The boards are 12” wide.



Other woodwork news:
Purchased a Woodriver 5-1/2 Jack Plane. Now I need to have the blade sharpened not to mention learning to set it up correctly.
He wrote, shortly before reconsidering and ordering a LV Veritas Low Angle Jack...

Hasselblad fucked around with this message at 17:45 on May 15, 2020

BrianBoitano
Nov 15, 2006

this is fine





Thank you for thorough advice! I'm going to go with whatever my local Ace Hardware has for crayon kits, I'll ask if they have Mohawk.

Paste wax sounds great. I gave away my crappy random orbit sander/buffer when I moved since I wanted to upgrade, though I was going to wait ~a year until I have a garage again. Around how long would it be to hand-buff it out for each repair?

I did shots of all the gouges, though there are a couple of pure dents that I'd like to not have to fill if I can try pure heat instead of steam?

I could do just edge banding here but I don't want to buy a roll just for this job and it's not going to be a highly visible magazine rack so




Probably 3 surface scratches, probably marker + paste wax only (this actually predated the move)


This is actually a brand new kitchen island that came dented and not worth disassembling and returning


For this one I got a free color swatch from a company that sells glorified white-out, I'll use a white crayon then that touch-up paint

Stultus Maximus
Dec 21, 2009

USPOL May


Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

Not super cheap overall, but pretty cheap per sq. ft. Certainly Wood are great people too.

http://certainlywood.com/results-packages.php

Just ordered it... S&H is quite something

Leperflesh
May 17, 2007







Smellrose

BrianBoitano posted:

Thank you for thorough advice! I'm going to go with whatever my local Ace Hardware has for crayon kits, I'll ask if they have Mohawk.

Paste wax sounds great. I gave away my crappy random orbit sander/buffer when I moved since I wanted to upgrade, though I was going to wait ~a year until I have a garage again. Around how long would it be to hand-buff it out for each repair?

I did shots of all the gouges, though there are a couple of pure dents that I'd like to not have to fill if I can try pure heat instead of steam?

I could do just edge banding here but I don't want to buy a roll just for this job and it's not going to be a highly visible magazine rack so




Probably 3 surface scratches, probably marker + paste wax only (this actually predated the move)


This is actually a brand new kitchen island that came dented and not worth disassembling and returning


For this one I got a free color swatch from a company that sells glorified white-out, I'll use a white crayon then that touch-up paint


This is my first impression, and I am by no means an expert. But with the possible exception of the third photo, those all look like particle board with veneer. The first one looks like the stained surface of the cardboard veneer has scraped off, and also not worth repairing but maybe if you want you could just paint it; the second one seems like the veneer has crushed in the particle board or ply that is behind it and not really repairable, but you can touch it up maybe; the third one I can't decide if that's veneer or what, but you could certainly just use the wax crayon thing and it'll probably come out looking pretty OK; the fourth one, again seems like veneer that is crushed in a little, but really small and not worth worrying about (and also it's a kitchen island, it's going to get lots of bangs and scuffs during use); and for the last one, again looks like a chunk of particle board is torn out and you can fill it with basically any poo poo you want (try wood filler), let it dry, sand it smooth, and then paint over it.

I do not want to be a furniture snob at all, here. But particle board furniture is always going to get banged up over time and is usually not worth a lot of effort to try to restore. I may also be wrong about one or more of those pics, it's not easy to tell from a single photo.

serious gaylord
Sep 16, 2007

what.


I've started making things this year and here's the projects I've done.

It all started with my wife complaining about her make up mirror being rubbish, so I made her one for her birthday in Jan. Accidentally made it brighter than the sun. Still works.







I then treated myself to a trip to a proper hardwood supplier, and if you think birch plywood is expensive in America let me tell you how much black walnut runs over here. I only bought a meter or so of it and I used it to improve a cheapo Amazon clock.





I'm basically learning as I go and I watch as much as I can on the old youtubes. Jonathan Katz-Moses posted a video about making an infinity cube, so I had a go at that too. Mine wasn't made in walnut though, because it would cost over £200. Pine and a bit of cherry works for my budget given the likelyhood of fuckups. I'd never done bridal joints before and didn't make a jig to do it, which was a big no no. Its really dodge up close, but copious amounts of filler hides it well enough.





Following this, a friend asked me to make them a new projector stand. This was really interesting, not just because of the wood he gave me to make it from, but that it had some severe design restrictions. It had to be no bigger than 250mm deep, and be able to pivot 90 degrees so they could point it at the ceiling so their kid could watch things in bed. It was very challenging for me since I tend to only start with a vague idea and build on the fly and the projector itself was 230mm deep. The pivot mechanism changed about 4 times to actually get to the point where it works and locks every 10 degrees.







I took a break from the inside, and built the wife a potting bench with some free plans I found online. I really enjoyed this one since I didn't have to be as precise.





And again, another youtube vid, John Maleki, another copy to see if I am capable of it. Tensegrity table with angled half laps and dovetails. Both of which again I'd not done before. Again, a bit dodgy up close but I made a jig for the joints this time and it came out much nicer. I'm also now starting to be able to visualise what i'm doing in my head and I'm catching myself before I make mistakes.







Thats where I'm up to so far this year, and I'm really enjoying it. Not sure what I'll make next, maybe another clock.

serious gaylord fucked around with this message at 23:12 on May 15, 2020

JEEVES420
Feb 16, 2005

The world is a mess... and I just need to rule it

serious gaylord posted:

I've started making things this year and here's the projects I've done.

It all started with my wife complaining about her make up mirror being rubbish, so I made her one for her birthday in Jan. Accidentally made it brighter than the sun. Still works.







I then treated myself to a trip to a proper hardwood supplier, and if you think birch plywood is expensive in America let me tell you how much black walnut runs over here. I only bought a meter or so of it and I used it to improve a cheapo Amazon clock.





I'm basically learning as I go and I watch as much as I can on the old youtubes. Jonathan Katz-Moses posted a video about making an infinity cube, so I had a go at that too. Mine wasn't made in walnut though, because it would cost over £200. Pine and a bit of cherry works for my budget given the likelyhood of fuckups. I'd never done bridal joints before and didn't make a jig to do it, which was a big no no. Its really dodge up close, but copious amounts of filler hides it well enough.





Following this, a friend asked me to make them a new projector stand. This was really interesting, not just because of the wood he gave me to make it from, but that it had some severe design restrictions. It had to be no bigger than 250mm deep, and be able to pivot 90 degrees so they could point it at the ceiling so their kid could watch things in bed. It was very challenging for me since I tend to only start with a vague idea and build on the fly and the projector itself was 230mm deep. The pivot mechanism changed about 4 times to actually get to the point where it works and locks every 10 degrees.







I took a break from the inside, and built the wife a potting bench with some free plans I found online. I really enjoyed this one since I didn't have to be as precise.





And again, another youtube vid, John Maleki, another copy to see if I am capable of it. Tensegrity table with angled half laps and dovetails. Both of which again I'd not done before. Again, a bit dodgy up close but I made a jig for the joints this time and it came out much nicer. I'm also now starting to be able to visualise what i'm doing in my head and I'm catching myself before I make mistakes.







Thats where I'm up to so far this year, and I'm really enjoying it. Not sure what I'll make next, maybe another clock.

I like your style. Keep on making

Mr. Mambold
Feb 13, 2011

Aha. Nice post.




serious gaylord posted:

I've started making things this year and here's the projects I've done.

It all started with my wife complaining about her make up mirror being rubbish, so I made her one for her birthday in Jan. Accidentally made it brighter than the sun. Still works.







I then treated myself to a trip to a proper hardwood supplier, and if you think birch plywood is expensive in America let me tell you how much black walnut runs over here. I only bought a meter or so of it and I used it to improve a cheapo Amazon clock.





I'm basically learning as I go and I watch as much as I can on the old youtubes. Jonathan Katz-Moses posted a video about making an infinity cube, so I had a go at that too. Mine wasn't made in walnut though, because it would cost over £200. Pine and a bit of cherry works for my budget given the likelyhood of fuckups. I'd never done bridal joints before and didn't make a jig to do it, which was a big no no. Its really dodge up close, but copious amounts of filler hides it well enough.





Following this, a friend asked me to make them a new projector stand. This was really interesting, not just because of the wood he gave me to make it from, but that it had some severe design restrictions. It had to be no bigger than 250mm deep, and be able to pivot 90 degrees so they could point it at the ceiling so their kid could watch things in bed. It was very challenging for me since I tend to only start with a vague idea and build on the fly and the projector itself was 230mm deep. The pivot mechanism changed about 4 times to actually get to the point where it works and locks every 10 degrees.







I took a break from the inside, and built the wife a potting bench with some free plans I found online. I really enjoyed this one since I didn't have to be as precise.





And again, another youtube vid, John Maleki, another copy to see if I am capable of it. Tensegrity table with angled half laps and dovetails. Both of which again I'd not done before. Again, a bit dodgy up close but I made a jig for the joints this time and it came out much nicer. I'm also now starting to be able to visualise what i'm doing in my head and I'm catching myself before I make mistakes.







Thats where I'm up to so far this year, and I'm really enjoying it. Not sure what I'll make next, maybe another clock.

Bhyo, you got married? Congrats. These projects are all well done, no surprise to me you'd fall right into this. Keep it up.

Super Waffle
Sep 25, 2007

I'm a hermaphrodite and my parents (40K nerds) named me Slaanesh, THANKS MOM

Ok so I went back to my shelf design as it just wasn't working for me. When things just don't work, you back and examine your base assumptions. As my design was based on a tutorial for a neo-classical design, I was stuck in the mindset of columns and capitals, which don't necessarily work for art deco. So I got rid of the capitals entirely and simplified the design while keeping my stepped 20 degree chamfer motif that I used for my baseboards.







I also realized there was nothing keeping the shelves from sliding out to I added a 1/2" overhang to the standard trim. I'd appreciate any comments! Still sorting out the bottom, ignore that

BrianBoitano
Nov 15, 2006

this is fine





Leperflesh posted:

This is my first impression, and I am by no means an expert. But with the possible exception of the third photo, those all look like particle board with veneer. The first one looks like the stained surface of the cardboard veneer has scraped off, and also not worth repairing but maybe if you want you could just paint it; the second one seems like the veneer has crushed in the particle board or ply that is behind it and not really repairable, but you can touch it up maybe; the third one I can't decide if that's veneer or what, but you could certainly just use the wax crayon thing and it'll probably come out looking pretty OK; the fourth one, again seems like veneer that is crushed in a little, but really small and not worth worrying about (and also it's a kitchen island, it's going to get lots of bangs and scuffs during use); and for the last one, again looks like a chunk of particle board is torn out and you can fill it with basically any poo poo you want (try wood filler), let it dry, sand it smooth, and then paint over it.

I do not want to be a furniture snob at all, here. But particle board furniture is always going to get banged up over time and is usually not worth a lot of effort to try to restore. I may also be wrong about one or more of those pics, it's not easy to tell from a single photo.

Yeah nah I'm going to give it a shot. Only costs a little bit to potentially save otherwise nice (by my standards, sure) furniture.

And FWIW, 1st and 3rd are veneered soft wood, last is a particle board trim but otherwise hardwood.

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




Delighted to find that a neighbour I get on with keeps a stock of wood scraps from other people for burning in the winter, so I've happily dropped off a giant bin of small offcuts.

Olothreutes
Mar 31, 2007



serious gaylord posted:

I took a break from the inside, and built the wife a potting bench with some free plans I found online. I really enjoyed this one since I didn't have to be as precise.





I accidentally showed this to my wife (I was trying to show her the tensegrity table, which I also want to try) and she'd like one. Do you have the plans handy? I'm probably going to end up making this in the near future.

Suntan Boy
May 27, 2005
Stained, dirty, smells like weed, possibly a relic from the sixties.





Hasselblad posted:

Concave dado at the end of the board. I considered having a clamp on the right side of the sled, but bridging the cut channel made me fearful of the stress I would be putting on that side of the sled, being attached solely by the “bridges” at both ends. The boards are 12” wide.

I closely based mine off of the Stumpy Nubs mini sled, and got so used to it that I assume everyone has an over engineered nightmare sled. If yours is likely to have bad times under that stress, then yeah, don't do what I was saying.

Speaking if which, my post had a typo; what I meant was what you inferred, to attach the knobs to the sled. After thinking about it, what I actually said might work, too, if you have some sacrificial width to the board you're working on. The only other thing I can think of would be some kind of screw press jig, and I have no idea how that would work.

Or I guess you could steam it with the mylar bag method, and clamp it flat while it dried. That might not work, but then you'd have a wood bending setup!

serious gaylord
Sep 16, 2007

what.


Olothreutes posted:

I accidentally showed this to my wife (I was trying to show her the tensegrity table, which I also want to try) and she'd like one. Do you have the plans handy? I'm probably going to end up making this in the near future.

Here you go.

I modified mine a fair bit as I had to make do with what I had available due to the current situation, but they're pretty comprehensive.

https://www.familyhandyman.com/gard...-potting-bench/

Mr. Mambold posted:

Bhyo, you got married? Congrats. These projects are all well done, no surprise to me you'd fall right into this. Keep it up.

Yes friend, its a bit odd for me obviously with my background. I've got a base level of knowledge and skills, but only in very specific areas. Its part of the reason I'm just having a go at whatever looks interesting.

Olothreutes
Mar 31, 2007



serious gaylord posted:

Here you go.

I modified mine a fair bit as I had to make do with what I had available due to the current situation, but they're pretty comprehensive.

https://www.familyhandyman.com/gard...-potting-bench/

Thank you. I'll be sure to post some shots when it's done.

I've been trying to figure out how to build that tensegrity table with magnets instead of the central wire (for maximum wtf), but magnetic fields drop off really quickly and finding magnets that are strong enough without being comically large and absurdly dangerous is hard. I don't want to resort to solid core electromagnets, a table that has to be plugged in is silly. Anyone have any ideas beyond giving up or having a really small gap? 1 to 2 inches of gap might be doable with permanent magnets but I figure that's so small that the visual effect is lost.

That Works
Jul 21, 2006


Fun Shoe

When I was moving the woodpile I noticed this one board that had a live edge on both sides and was fairly thick and straight

Anyways, seems like it's just begging to be used as a whole, it's a little under 9 feet. After cutting off some end checking I think it'll be around 8' 6" or so.



I'm thinking I want to use it along the wall here just under these windows. Ideally it'll hold some smaller potted plants and be something that the cats hang out on. There's 2 complicating factors here.



1. There's a baseboard heater just below it that keeps me from putting legs on it flush against the wall.
2. It's pretty narrow so I don't know that I want to make it a full on table anyway.

So my problem is how to mount it? I am not sure that legs work great given I want it close to the wall but the baseboard heater is also there. but I don't know of a way to float it out from the wall either really. I could do some kind of brackets on a few studs and paint them white or the color of the wall paint so they don't stand out and I think I'd be OK with that but I'm not really sure. It won't need to bear much weight, just going to be decorative and hold some plants.

Any ideas?

Falco
Dec 30, 2003

Freewheeling At Last

That Works posted:

When I was moving the woodpile I noticed this one board that had a live edge on both sides and was fairly thick and straight

Anyways, seems like it's just begging to be used as a whole, it's a little under 9 feet. After cutting off some end checking I think it'll be around 8' 6" or so.



I'm thinking I want to use it along the wall here just under these windows. Ideally it'll hold some smaller potted plants and be something that the cats hang out on. There's 2 complicating factors here.



1. There's a baseboard heater just below it that keeps me from putting legs on it flush against the wall.
2. It's pretty narrow so I don't know that I want to make it a full on table anyway.

So my problem is how to mount it? I am not sure that legs work great given I want it close to the wall but the baseboard heater is also there. but I don't know of a way to float it out from the wall either really. I could do some kind of brackets on a few studs and paint them white or the color of the wall paint so they don't stand out and I think I'd be OK with that but I'm not really sure. It won't need to bear much weight, just going to be decorative and hold some plants.

Any ideas?

They actually make floating shelf brackets/posts that would work great in this application.

https://www.rockler.com/blind-shelf-supports

Or another method would be brackets like this if you didn’t mind some of it showing


https://www.etsy.com/listing/563889...CgaAvykEALw_wcB

serious gaylord
Sep 16, 2007

what.


Olothreutes posted:

Thank you. I'll be sure to post some shots when it's done.

I've been trying to figure out how to build that tensegrity table with magnets instead of the central wire (for maximum wtf), but magnetic fields drop off really quickly and finding magnets that are strong enough without being comically large and absurdly dangerous is hard. I don't want to resort to solid core electromagnets, a table that has to be plugged in is silly. Anyone have any ideas beyond giving up or having a really small gap? 1 to 2 inches of gap might be doable with permanent magnets but I figure that's so small that the visual effect is lost.

The central point takes the most stress. I had to modify mine so I could triple up the fishing line as it kept snapping when I was tightening the outside points to get it square. I don't think you'd be able to do this with magnets.

Olothreutes
Mar 31, 2007



serious gaylord posted:

The central point takes the most stress. I had to modify mine so I could triple up the fishing line as it kept snapping when I was tightening the outside points to get it square. I don't think you'd be able to do this with magnets.

I'm almost certain that the middle section takes all the stress, the outer wires are just guy-wires. They really just keep it from pivoting and falling around the middle point. So you need a central wire that's strong enough to support the weight of the table and anything you set on it with no other assistance. For the magnets It really depends on what sort of gap I want. If I'm willing to spend like $700 on magnets (I'm not) I can get roughly 100 pounds of force with a three inch gap. If I decide to go with solid core electromagnets then I have other issues, like both parts of the table needing to be plugged in to receive power, and also a table that generates a magnetic field strong enough to erase your credit cards if you set your wallet on it. And crashes to the floor if the power goes out.

That actually sounds really funny, in a very dumb way. "If you have a pacemaker please stay at least six feet away from this side table at all times, thanks."

E: actually now that I think about it, if I just stack up some additional magnets and widen the surface area of the support points I could probably get this to work. I'll have to think on it some more.

Olothreutes fucked around with this message at 23:00 on May 16, 2020

That Works
Jul 21, 2006


Fun Shoe

Falco posted:

They actually make floating shelf brackets/posts that would work great in this application.

https://www.rockler.com/blind-shelf-supports

Or another method would be brackets like this if you didn’t mind some of it showing


https://www.etsy.com/listing/563889...CgaAvykEALw_wcB

Thanks! I think the 2nd one is more likely to work out since both sides of the slab are a bit uneven. If one edge was squared and could be flush with the wall the 1st option would be great.

I'll try to get some heavy steel brackets in white (or paint some white) and that should work out pretty good with how low the slab will sit. They should barely be visible.

Leperflesh
May 17, 2007







Smellrose

Olothreutes posted:

I'm almost certain that the middle section takes all the stress, the outer wires are just guy-wires. They really just keep it from pivoting and falling around the middle point. So you need a central wire that's strong enough to support the weight of the table and anything you set on it with no other assistance. For the magnets It really depends on what sort of gap I want. If I'm willing to spend like $700 on magnets (I'm not) I can get roughly 100 pounds of force with a three inch gap. If I decide to go with solid core electromagnets then I have other issues, like both parts of the table needing to be plugged in to receive power, and also a table that generates a magnetic field strong enough to erase your credit cards if you set your wallet on it. And crashes to the floor if the power goes out.

That actually sounds really funny, in a very dumb way. "If you have a pacemaker please stay at least six feet away from this side table at all times, thanks."

E: actually now that I think about it, if I just stack up some additional magnets and widen the surface area of the support points I could probably get this to work. I'll have to think on it some more.

The tensegrity tables work in tension. The different cables are all tensioned so that they create an equilibrium of opposing forces. How will this work with magnets? You can make a magnet float using repulsion of the like poles, but the tension side of thing is tough because even if you can find an equilibrium point where the magnets are pulling toward each other enough to provide tension while not snapping together, the slightest movement of the movable parts of the table will bring them too close together and they'll snap shut, or too far apart and they'll lose tension.

Basically, I think you could built the table, maybe, but you won't be able to touch it or even sneeze near it.

You could definitely build a floating table using magnets, but you'd want a totally different design from the tensegrity ones. You want patterns of magnets that set up zones of equilibrium such that whenever any part moves out of that zone, the magnets tend to push it back into that zone.


These things work because any time the center magnet moves towards an edge, it's moving into a zone of increasing repulsion; the equilibrium point is at the middle. I think you have to do something similar.

Olothreutes
Mar 31, 2007



There are examples of the tensegrity tables using magnets instead of a physical line, but they're all pretty small and are more of a desktop proof of concept than a piece of furniture. In this case the magnetic attraction gives you some amount of force that will function as a tensile member. It's just a tensile member that has a known and hopefully constant value, which doesn't scale the same way a physical wire does.

korora
Sep 3, 2011


Using a magnet in the center is always going to make the structure unstable under load because all of the forces decrease as the top moves downward—the air gap is increasing and the wires are relaxing. Also, don’t forget to account for the tension in the outer wires when you compute the force on the center member. You need the outer wires to be tensioned to provide stiffness and stability, which has to be balanced at the center.

Elysium
Aug 21, 2003
It is by will alone I set my mind in motion.

How’s this one look?





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That Works
Jul 21, 2006


Fun Shoe

Elysium posted:

How’s this one look?







I'd much rather one with a solid steel top. That one has the weird cheaper corrugated one. It would probably work, but unless you're in a market with zero options I'd probably wait.

e: not the best shot but I got this one for $125 a year and a half ago. Ignore the temporary homemade fence. It's rocking a Delta fence now.



That Works fucked around with this message at 18:08 on May 17, 2020

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