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HolHorsejob
Mar 13, 2020

In the land of Hyrule, there echoes a legend. A legend held dearly by the Royal Family tells of a boy... A boy who, after battling evil and saving Hyrule, crept away from the land that made him a legend... Done with the battles he once waged across time, he embarked on a journey...


BrianBoitano posted:

He's saying this doesn't have good support for small cut-offs


And he wants to build something like this



For which I'll link the video I found by googling by a guy I trust anyhow:
https://youtu.be/rOwZhKX95HM

Easier version:
https://youtu.be/BwGD-0ouBUg

That's the one! OK, so pretty easy to make. I don't think mine will be quite so long.

edit: cat tax

HolHorsejob fucked around with this message at 05:38 on May 21, 2020

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The Spookmaster
Sep 9, 2002



I had never used Bondo on wood until today but I 100% recommend it over regular wood filler if you are painting.

Elysium
Aug 21, 2003
It is by will alone I set my mind in motion.

Just a little update on that sander I was trying to buy, the sale price is now over and Home Depot is magically all stocked up again.

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns






The Spookmaster posted:

I had never used Bondo on wood until today but I 100% recommend it over regular wood filler if you are painting.
Yeah it's great where you need the hardness. It doesn't always hold up suuuuper well outside because it doesn't expand/contract the same way as wood and eventually it tends to fall out.

There is a school of thought furniture restoration (even in high-end/antiques) that basically says 'replace the loss with bondo and grain paint/touch up to match.' It has the advantage of making the repair immediately obvious to any future restorer as well as dating the repair as modern, and antiques collectors/museums like that. When done well it can be pretty damned invisible and durable too.

more falafel please
Feb 26, 2005

forums poster

I have an Avanti dado stack and it sucks. The chippers are all at different heights, so it doesn't give flat bottom grooves, and it's hard to get the chipper teeth aligned so they don't immediately knock into each other when I start tightening the arbor nut.

Any reason I should *not* buy this Freud set for what looks like basically 50% off list? https://www.amazon.com/Freud-Stacke.../dp/B072MJ2V9J/

more falafel please
Feb 26, 2005

forums poster

Also, I bought some float glass and sandpaper for "scary sharp" because I'd like to get a couple of planes, maintain the edge on my chisels, etc. I don't think I like "scary sharp", there's an awful lot of finicky work to get everything perfect, and if I mess up and push a blade instead of pull it, I just ruined like $5 worth of sandpaper. If I go with diamond stones, I really only need like 3 and a strop, right? Any recommendations on a set?

Meow Meow Meow
Nov 13, 2010


more falafel please posted:

Also, I bought some float glass and sandpaper for "scary sharp" because I'd like to get a couple of planes, maintain the edge on my chisels, etc. I don't think I like "scary sharp", there's an awful lot of finicky work to get everything perfect, and if I mess up and push a blade instead of pull it, I just ruined like $5 worth of sandpaper. If I go with diamond stones, I really only need like 3 and a strop, right? Any recommendations on a set?

I've got the DMT Dia-Sharp stones...course, fine, and extra-fine. Then I have a Lee Valley lapping plate with 3u diamond paste on one side and 1u diamond paste on the other side. It works well, everything gets super sharp.

Squibbles
Aug 24, 2000

Mwaha ha HA ha!

more falafel please posted:

I have an Avanti dado stack and it sucks. The chippers are all at different heights, so it doesn't give flat bottom grooves, and it's hard to get the chipper teeth aligned so they don't immediately knock into each other when I start tightening the arbor nut.

Any reason I should *not* buy this Freud set for what looks like basically 50% off list? https://www.amazon.com/Freud-Stacke.../dp/B072MJ2V9J/

Camelcamelcamel shows it's been cheaper recently. Also looks like it never really sells for list price. At least not on amazon https://camelcamelcamel.com/product...edium=camelizer

Suntan Boy
May 27, 2005
Stained, dirty, smells like weed, possibly a relic from the sixties.





more falafel please posted:

I have an Avanti dado stack and it sucks. The chippers are all at different heights, so it doesn't give flat bottom grooves, and it's hard to get the chipper teeth aligned so they don't immediately knock into each other when I start tightening the arbor nut.

Any reason I should *not* buy this Freud set for what looks like basically 50% off list? https://www.amazon.com/Freud-Stacke.../dp/B072MJ2V9J/

I just returned a set of these! The tips on every single blade were variable enough they I could never get anything as precise as I wanted just from the table. I dunno man, Freud's QC is all over the place, but I'd gamble on it at that price.

more falafel please posted:

Also, I bought some float glass and sandpaper for "scary sharp" because I'd like to get a couple of planes, maintain the edge on my chisels, etc. I don't think I like "scary sharp", there's an awful lot of finicky work to get everything perfect, and if I mess up and push a blade instead of pull it, I just ruined like $5 worth of sandpaper. If I go with diamond stones, I really only need like 3 and a strop, right? Any recommendations on a set?

Yeah, that's pretty much all you need, though a set of 4 progressive stones makes flattening the back of plane blades and refurbishing old poo poo way easier. I have a set of DMT Diasharp stones that I like a lot, but $$$$.

What I really love for sharpening all of my manual blades is my knockoff Edge Pro, though. Had to dick with it a bit to get it to work with anything other than kitchen knives, but oh my God it makes the work so much easier. Just mount a (proprietary, usually) diamond stone, set your angle, and zone out for a few minutes. Rinse, repeat until you've reached the essence of sharp, hone on some cobwebs.

Granite Octopus
Jun 24, 2008



more falafel please posted:

Also, I bought some float glass and sandpaper for "scary sharp" because I'd like to get a couple of planes, maintain the edge on my chisels, etc. I don't think I like "scary sharp", there's an awful lot of finicky work to get everything perfect, and if I mess up and push a blade instead of pull it, I just ruined like $5 worth of sandpaper. If I go with diamond stones, I really only need like 3 and a strop, right? Any recommendations on a set?

I started with sandpaper, used waterstones and now use diamond stones. Sandpaper is fine in a pinch but I really wouldnt want to use it long term. Too much hassle and I always ended up with problems with the sandpaper stretching and "bubbling" up ahead of the sharpened edge. It also tore a lot as well. Maybe I just had poo poo sandpaper but it's literally the best stuff I could buy locally. Stones are way more reliable.

I have both DMT and Eze-Lap diamond stones. The DMT ones are thicker and heavier, so maybe they are slightly better, but tbh they both work fine. I started out with just fine + superfine, but I now have a course +medium ones as well. I use fine + superfine 90% of the time. The others only get used in the case of extreme fuckups. I like to keep a small spray bottle handy with some plain water in it for lubrication. Building a little plywood base keeps them organised and doesnt take long to make. Beware though it's surprisingly heavy when populated with 3 stones. They also don't like being dropped...

Strops are great, and they'll take you from sharp to razor sharp. You dont have to buy anything fancy, just glue a piece of old leather to a scap of wood. Get some aluminium oxide compound if you want it to work faster, but that isn't even strictly necessary. If you are disciplined you can maintain an edge on a strop only if you re-hone frequently enough.

Numinous
May 20, 2001



College Slice

more falafel please posted:

Also, I bought some float glass and sandpaper for "scary sharp" because I'd like to get a couple of planes, maintain the edge on my chisels, etc. I don't think I like "scary sharp", there's an awful lot of finicky work to get everything perfect, and if I mess up and push a blade instead of pull it, I just ruined like $5 worth of sandpaper. If I go with diamond stones, I really only need like 3 and a strop, right? Any recommendations on a set?

I think diamond stones are less finicky than water stones but I've been using one of these guys

https://www.amazon.com/KDS-Combinat...90280195&sr=8-1

Originally for sharpening some nice kitchen knives and lately for a couple veritas hand planes and some chisels as I embark on this newish woodworking journey I'm on.

If you've already got the float glass and some sand paper then you have everything you need to keep a water stone flat and you would just need to pickup a cheapo holder:

https://www.amazon.com/POWERTEC-710...90280620&sr=8-1

Something to think about for about 1/4 the price of diamond stones.

That being said, I've been doing some research and the DMT DuoSharp seem to be pretty popular:

https://www.sharpeningsupplies.com/...one-P127C3.aspx

but a lot of people like to use a combo type of setup. Diamond stone for coarse grit and finish with a water stone. Thats kinda the direction I'm looking in now to step up my sharpening game.

Teabag Dome Scandal
Mar 19, 2002





Smellrose

I got some patio chairs off the buy nothing that need a little work and I'm not sure how to go about it. I think the wood is pine but whatever it is I think it was too soft for the hardware used. Whoever built it used some wood inserts and they're pretty lose in general and one fell out entirely.



Can I reuse that hole? Maybe put in some wood glue to keep the insert in place? The insert is 3/4" and I found some wider 1/2" long inserts that use the same internal thread as the old bolt that might be able to fit in the old hole more snugly. Maybe I could drill out the hole a lot deeper and use a longer bolt to keep the side to side wiggling to a minimum? I'm probably better off moving that back into a hole through the backrest with some sort of spacer. Not sure why the original person didn't do it that way.

Any suggestions would be appreciated!

more falafel please
Feb 26, 2005

forums poster

I currently have zero hand planes and would like to have more than zero. I have a bunch of power tools, so I'd likely be going for a vaguely hybrid style. There's not much in the way of vintage tools near me, unless I want to mine estate sales and stuff like that. Does a Stanley Bailey low angle block plane and a Sweetheart #62 (both new) sound like a good starting point? It seems like the 62 with a couple different blades will let me kind of do the job of a #4, an #5, and maybe kinda-sorta a jointer. I don't really want to spend the extra money on a Lie Nielsen or Veritas.

Leperflesh
May 17, 2007







Smellrose

more falafel please posted:

I currently have zero hand planes and would like to have more than zero. I have a bunch of power tools, so I'd likely be going for a vaguely hybrid style. There's not much in the way of vintage tools near me, unless I want to mine estate sales and stuff like that. Does a Stanley Bailey low angle block plane and a Sweetheart #62 (both new) sound like a good starting point? It seems like the 62 with a couple different blades will let me kind of do the job of a #4, an #5, and maybe kinda-sorta a jointer. I don't really want to spend the extra money on a Lie Nielsen or Veritas.

What do you want to do with your planes?

more falafel please
Feb 26, 2005

forums poster

Leperflesh posted:

What do you want to do with your planes?

Mostly things that I'm now doing with sandpaper -- flushing up edges, breaking corners/chamfering, that sort of thing. But I'd also like to be able to flatten an edge or a face. I don't have a powered jointer or planer and it'll probably be a while before I get one.

Leperflesh
May 17, 2007







Smellrose

I would say I generally like your plan, except for how both planes are low-angle. Not that that's definitely bad; but I have about five functional planes*, none of which is a low-angle plane, and the only one I want right now is the low-angle block plane (for dealing with swirly-grained stuff and the end grain on small planks and boards a little easier).

If I'm jointing long boards to remove cupping or something I want a big honking stonker of a longass plane; and when I'm doing all-purpose stuff, the high angle of a regular #4 seems to work great for me. Hopefully someone with more experience with low-angle planes can chime in?

I'll just add that although the prices seem to have risen the last couple years, you can still get lots of old-style used planes for decent prices on eBay. Assume you'll need to re-grind and sharpen the iron, maybe flatten the bottom, but otherwise a very serviceable #4 plane should be available for around $30 to $40 plus shipping.


*and a dozen nonfunctional ones in the queue for refurbishing, look I have a problem

more falafel please
Feb 26, 2005

forums poster

Leperflesh posted:

I would say I generally like your plan, except for how both planes are low-angle. Not that that's definitely bad; but I have about five functional planes*, none of which is a low-angle plane, and the only one I want right now is the low-angle block plane (for dealing with swirly-grained stuff and the end grain on small planks and boards a little easier).

If I'm jointing long boards to remove cupping or something I want a big honking stonker of a longass plane; and when I'm doing all-purpose stuff, the high angle of a regular #4 seems to work great for me. Hopefully someone with more experience with low-angle planes can chime in?

I'll just add that although the prices seem to have risen the last couple years, you can still get lots of old-style used planes for decent prices on eBay. Assume you'll need to re-grind and sharpen the iron, maybe flatten the bottom, but otherwise a very serviceable #4 plane should be available for around $30 to $40 plus shipping.


*and a dozen nonfunctional ones in the queue for refurbishing, look I have a problem

I might buy the block plane first, since I know I've got uses for it, get to know it, get a good sense of sharpening it, then figure out what else I want. I'd be buying from different sites so it's not like I'm saving the shipping buying all at once. It's just tempting to dive in with both feet!

Hasselblad
Dec 13, 2017
NRA shill who thinks homeless people would love to live in migrant border camps. Help me realize I am a bigoted piece of shit.


Suntan Boy posted:

I just returned a set of these! The tips on every single blade were variable enough they I could never get anything as precise as I wanted just from the table. I dunno man, Freud's QC is all over the place, but I'd gamble on it at that price.

Yeah, I returned my Freud 8" set last month, got a set of the Oshlun in 8" and am quite happy with it. Already had a 6" Oshlun set and should have just stuck with it, but I saw the Freud name and thought they'd be decent.

In regard to the blades turning when you tighten the nut, be certain you wipe each blade down well before installing.

Granite Octopus posted:

I started with sandpaper, used waterstones and now use diamond stones. Sandpaper is fine in a pinch but I really wouldnt want to use it long term. Too much hassle and I always ended up with problems with the sandpaper stretching and "bubbling" up ahead of the sharpened edge. It also tore a lot as well. Maybe I just had poo poo sandpaper but it's literally the best stuff I could buy locally. Stones are way more reliable.

I have both DMT and Eze-Lap diamond stones. The DMT ones are thicker and heavier, so maybe they are slightly better, but tbh they both work fine. I started out with just fine + superfine, but I now have a course +medium ones as well. I use fine + superfine 90% of the time. The others only get used in the case of extreme fuckups. I like to keep a small spray bottle handy with some plain water in it for lubrication. Building a little plywood base keeps them organised and doesnt take long to make. Beware though it's surprisingly heavy when populated with 3 stones. They also don't like being dropped...

Strops are great, and they'll take you from sharp to razor sharp. You dont have to buy anything fancy, just glue a piece of old leather to a scap of wood. Get some aluminium oxide compound if you want it to work faster, but that isn't even strictly necessary. If you are disciplined you can maintain an edge on a strop only if you re-hone frequently enough.

Are you doing microbevels? I haven't taken my Veritas to wood yet, as I am going to take the blade to a local (20 miles away) shop that does our kitchen knives until I can afford a decent set of stones and angle honing guide.

Hasselblad fucked around with this message at 14:30 on May 24, 2020

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns






Hasselblad posted:

Yeah, I returned my Freud 8" set last month, got a set of the Oshlun in 8" and am quite happy with it. Already had a 6" Oshlun set and should have just stuck with it, but I saw the Freud name and thought they'd be decent.

In regard to the blades turning when you tighten the nut, be certain you wipe each blade down well before installing.


Are you doing microbevels? I haven't taken my Veritas to wood yet, as I am going to take the blade to a local (20 miles away) shop that does our kitchen knives until I can afford a decent set of stones and angle honing guide.

Veritas blades come super sharp, so you might not need to. I just buffed mine a touch-it didn't need much to be scary sharp, and came very very sharp out of the box.

Hasselblad
Dec 13, 2017
NRA shill who thinks homeless people would love to live in migrant border camps. Help me realize I am a bigoted piece of shit.


Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

Veritas blades come super sharp, so you might not need to. I just buffed mine a touch-it didn't need much to be scary sharp, and came very very sharp out of the box.

Did the armhair test on mine and found it could use a little work. Used to be able to get my chisel armhair sharp with a stone and wobbly guide. I want to get my planer that fine before diving in.

The DMTs mentioned earlier are a bit cheaper on amazon (shocker): https://www.amazon.com/DMT-WM8EF-WB...h/dp/B000H6L6FA

JEEVES420
Feb 16, 2005

The world is a mess... and I just need to rule it

Hasselblad posted:

In regard to the blades turning when you tighten the nut, be certain you wipe each blade down well before installing.

If your stack is moving when you tighten the nut you don't have them in the correct placement. The teeth should all overlap resting behind each other, if you spin the right blade toward you with your hand it should lock the stack. This could explain why you didn't get clean cuts with it

Hasselblad
Dec 13, 2017
NRA shill who thinks homeless people would love to live in migrant border camps. Help me realize I am a bigoted piece of shit.


JEEVES420 posted:

If your stack is moving when you tighten the nut you don't have them in the correct placement. The teeth should all overlap resting behind each other, if you spin the right blade toward you with your hand it should lock the stack. This could explain why you didn't get clean cuts with it

I install the same way I have always installed my 6" Oshluns. (I am not the one currently with an issue with them spinning when tightening the nut) Never had the issue (the uneven cuts) until that set of Freuds. The 8" Oshluns I replaced them with works flawlessly.

Hasselblad fucked around with this message at 15:48 on May 24, 2020

more falafel please
Feb 26, 2005

forums poster

JEEVES420 posted:

If your stack is moving when you tighten the nut you don't have them in the correct placement. The teeth should all overlap resting behind each other, if you spin the right blade toward you with your hand it should lock the stack. This could explain why you didn't get clean cuts with it

Like the carbide tooth of one blade touching the tooth of the next? I thought that was exactly what I was trying to avoid. I've been setting them up so the teeth align with the gullet of the previous blade.

JEEVES420
Feb 16, 2005

The world is a mess... and I just need to rule it

more falafel please posted:

Like the carbide tooth of one blade touching the tooth of the next? I thought that was exactly what I was trying to avoid. I've been setting them up so the teeth align with the gullet of the previous blade.

The tips shouldn't touch. They have a slant that allow it to rest behind the tooth while keeping the sharp parts free to do their job. Here are some lovely photos I took real quick.




Breakers have the nub that rest directly behind the tooth of the previous.


All together they should look gapped from above but are touching to rotate towards you together.


With them all on the arbor you should be able to rotate each towards you until they "hit" the previous. Once all are on hold the left and then rotate the right towards you while keeping them together; the nut should tighten it up the rest of the way. What you don't want is for them to smack into each other when you turn the saw on.

ColdPie
Jun 9, 2006



Hair Elf

more falafel please posted:

Mostly things that I'm now doing with sandpaper -- flushing up edges, breaking corners/chamfering, that sort of thing. But I'd also like to be able to flatten an edge or a face. I don't have a powered jointer or planer and it'll probably be a while before I get one.

Yeah starting with a block plane is a great idea. You'll use it even if you get a jointer/planer down the road.

I'm wary to recommend anything by today's Stanley. My first hand plane was a brand new Stanley #4 and it was absolute crap. It has stupid features that just get in the way (you don't need an adjustable mouth) and the depth adjuster was built in to the later adjustment lever, which means tweaking one setting screws up the other, and it had some weird lateral adjustment screw that was just another thing to set up wrong. I don't know if the #62 has the same problems, but the #4 was bad enough that I would use caution. A bad tool is usually worse than no tool. Don't buy another cheap Ryobi tablesaw

I strongly suggest buying a vintage plane, or step up to a Veritas or a Lie Nielsen. A vintage #5 is sufficient to flatten boards under about 4', and adding a #7 or #8 will let you flatten anything. I got my ~1920 #5 on eBay for $25, and my ~1900 #8 locally for $100, but that was years ago and I think prices a bit higher these days. Also note that flattening stock by hand is a shitload of work and takes skill and practice, but I enjoy it. A good sharpening setup is required for hand planes, so have a plan for that.

ColdPie
Jun 9, 2006



Hair Elf

And now for my own question. Can anyone recommend a good online lumber dealer? I've always purchased locally, but that's awkward these days, and my favorite lumber yard closed down last summer anyway. Seems like a good time to try buying online. I live in Minnesota, and I'd be looking to buy about 6-8' boards, I'm not sure if that causes shipping issues.

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns






ColdPie posted:

And now for my own question. Can anyone recommend a good online lumber dealer? I've always purchased locally, but that's awkward these days, and my favorite lumber yard closed down last summer anyway. Seems like a good time to try buying online. I live in Minnesota, and I'd be looking to buy about 6-8' boards, I'm not sure if that causes shipping issues.
Unless your local lumber yard is terrible and expensive, buying lumber online is almost certainly going to be more expensive than locally because shipping is expensive.

I bought some padouk from Wall Lumber in NC a few years ago and was happy. Their prices are actually pretty good for retail, and they cut a 14' board down for me so it could ship UPS/FedEX. Anything over 8' has to go LTL freight or there is a big over-length up-charge from UPS/FedEx. Shipping isn't cheap either way, and will add considerably to the price. I think they were able to give me a shipping price before they sent it, but I can't remember exactly. They were nice folks though if you give them a call and were happy to find me a board that suited my needs.
https://walllumber.com/

Hasselblad
Dec 13, 2017
NRA shill who thinks homeless people would love to live in migrant border camps. Help me realize I am a bigoted piece of shit.


ColdPie posted:

A bad tool is usually worse than no tool.

Amen to that. I learned early in life to buy once, cry once. Especially if it is something you will have for the rest of your life. Bad tools (and musical instruments) just cause frustration that sucks the enjoyment out of what you ware working on.

Elder Postsman
Aug 30, 2000


i used hot bot to search for "teens"



ColdPie posted:

And now for my own question. Can anyone recommend a good online lumber dealer? I've always purchased locally, but that's awkward these days, and my favorite lumber yard closed down last summer anyway. Seems like a good time to try buying online. I live in Minnesota, and I'd be looking to buy about 6-8' boards, I'm not sure if that causes shipping issues.

Have you checked out forest products supply in Maplewood? Thatís been my go-to, though mostly just for their cutoffs bin. They are still open and doing pickup orders.

ColdPie
Jun 9, 2006



Hair Elf

Elder Postsman posted:

Have you checked out forest products supply in Maplewood? Thatís been my go-to, though mostly just for their cutoffs bin. They are still open and doing pickup orders.

Oh yeah, they're great, although I find their selection is much more limited than Youngblood's was. I've also tried Siwek but their selection seems even smaller and I wasn't impressed with how they run their store. Mostly I'm just exploring my options. I'd like to avoid going to a store if possible. I tend to spend an hour picking through the stack for good boards and that just seems extra rude right now. After doing some research I wonder if my best option is to just buy a stack of wood, like order 100-200 bf of cherry from Forest Products and have them deliver it to my shop. That should supply me for my next few projects. There'll be some junk wood in there for sure, and I'll have to build some kind of lumber rack, but it may be worth the savings in time & hassle.

Juergoslav
Mar 10, 2013


Why exactly are plunge saws regarded as more precise than circular saws both on a rail?
Afaik the only reason that i know of is that normal circular saws have more play on a rail or is there something more to it?
The festool hk 55 has the same knobs to tighten up on the rail like the ts55 so why would the ts be more precise?


I was thinking about getting a plunge saw but for my next project i would mostly have to cut posts and boards to length but next up would be boards.
The hk 55 fits on the fsk rail unlike the ts 55.
That would kill the need for a mitre saw.

The hk + fsk and normal rail would be cheaper than a makita or bosch plunge saw + extra mitre saw

And since i dont have a workshop i always work oudside so the hk solution looks like a perfect fit for me IF its as precise as a plunge saw

The Slack Lagoon
Jun 17, 2008



Finally have some space to do woodworking - is there a reccomendation on a basics book? There are a lot of recs in the OP. Looking to do some info on basic jointing and finishing

That Works
Jul 21, 2006


Fun Shoe

The Slack Lagoon posted:

Finally have some space to do woodworking - is there a reccomendation on a basics book? There are a lot of recs in the OP. Looking to do some info on basic jointing and finishing

I started out with both of these and couldn't recommend them more highly.

https://smile.amazon.com/Minimalist...ps%2C204&sr=8-1

https://smile.amazon.com/Understand...es%2A=0&ie=UTF8

You can find cheaper used copies on ebay or maybe even at the library?

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns






ColdPie posted:

After doing some research I wonder if my best option is to just buy a stack of wood, like order 100-200 bf of cherry from Forest Products and have them deliver it to my shop. That should supply me for my next few projects. There'll be some junk wood in there for sure, and I'll have to build some kind of lumber rack, but it may be worth the savings in time & hassle.
This is what I have to do now since my supplier doesnít let people pick through stuff anymore. Itís okay? Understanding the grade rules becomes more important to know what youíre ordering. If you want wides, itís worth asking-some places will sort stuff into 8Ē and wider or 10Ē and wider depending on species/demand, or they may be willing to pick wider stuff (usually at a higher price, but not always). Wholesale places donít care about upcharging for width as much as retail-it doesnít matter if itís 200 bf of FAS where every board is 12Ē or 6Ē wide, itís just 200bf of FAS cherry to them.

ColdPie
Jun 9, 2006



Hair Elf

Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

This is what I have to do now since my supplier doesnít let people pick through stuff anymore. Itís okay? Understanding the grade rules becomes more important to know what youíre ordering. If you want wides, itís worth asking-some places will sort stuff into 8Ē and wider or 10Ē and wider depending on species/demand, or they may be willing to pick wider stuff (usually at a higher price, but not always). Wholesale places donít care about upcharging for width as much as retail-it doesnít matter if itís 200 bf of FAS where every board is 12Ē or 6Ē wide, itís just 200bf of FAS cherry to them.

Do you have any thoughts on quantity? Is 100 bf a small order, or are they happy to fill that? Most places I've seen do charge more for >8". I've found a few wholesale places, but they seem to explicitly sell only to businesses, which isn't surprising.

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns






My main supplier is wholesale only and only sells to businesses and they only have a $200 minimum order for lumber. They fill orders for everything from lilí olí me buying 3 boards each of 4 species to entire truckloads of sapele. I donít think anyone is going to laugh at you for only wanting 100bf. Iíd just ask-they may have a minimum and Iím sure theyíd be glad to tell you about it.

Elder Postsman
Aug 30, 2000


i used hot bot to search for "teens"



Forest products supply was totally fine with putting together $20 worth of oak, maple, and beech cutoffs for me to pick up a few weeks ago Į\_(ツ)_/Į

His Divine Shadow
Aug 7, 2000

I'm not a fascist. I'm a priest. Fascists dress up in black and tell people what to do.


Holy moly I finally finished my Bill Pentz dust collector cyclone build. It only took three years (I kept loosing interest and did other things).

But there's still the ducting....

Interesting phenomenon with it, it separates the fine stuff, but larger stuff keeps circling around in the cone until shut off, doesn't leave out the cyclone, just swirls around in it. Understand this can be because of too much flow, perhaps it will become better with ducting to add air flow resistance.

Hasselblad
Dec 13, 2017
NRA shill who thinks homeless people would love to live in migrant border camps. Help me realize I am a bigoted piece of shit.


Speaking of dust collectors, has anyone experience with the harbor freight 2hp model?
https://www.harborfreight.com/2-hp-...ctor-97869.html

May soon pull the trigger on it, after I track down a discount coupon.

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TooMuchAbstraction
Oct 14, 2012

Hubris

Fun Shoe

I have it, it works fine. I have no experience with other dust collectors so I don't really know what if anything I'm missing out on. I remember the assembly being a bit frustrating; I think there were some very similarly-shaped bolts/screws, and some kind of fiddly bits that were tricky to hold in place while getting the connectors connected. But it's held up well through a few years of intermittent use.

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