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Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




18mm (they don't do 19mm) 4x8' at my local is £73.20, so quick maffs that is 90 bux inc tax for BB/CP/LG quality. Pseudo-retail.

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The Slack Lagoon
Jun 17, 2008



I made a little table for our outside covered porch. What's a good finish to put on it to help with being outside?

JEEVES420
Feb 16, 2005

The world is a mess... and I just need to rule it

Elysium posted:

I just called my local lumber yard to ask about plywood prices, and they said they had 3/4 Baltic Birch in 5x5 for about $60. Is that a decent price? Actually I canít remember now if he said 49 or 59.

For comparison the best sheet of plywood i can get at HD is about $55 for 4x8 with a thin veneer (not the same as Baltic)

I pay ~$48 for a 4x8 sheet. Like Kaiser said BB has gone up in the past few months. If you're not worried about finish or need complete sheets you can ask about damaged ones, sometimes they will have top/bottom of pallets with some strap damage, marked face, etc.

Leperflesh
May 17, 2007







Smellrose

Not all baltic birch is identical, do keep that in mind. There is some lower quality stuff floating around out there.

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


The Slack Lagoon posted:

I made a little table for our outside covered porch. What's a good finish to put on it to help with being outside?

You have ~3 main options.
-Heavy film finish that will last several years but need to be completely stripped and refinished when it eventually fails.
-Oil finish that won't protect as much, and needs yearly (potentially) maintenance that is quite easy. Can be varying degrees of varnish to oil ratio and sort of tweak the level of protection, but not hugely.
-No finish and just embrace the grey


Water and UV exposure are the main thing that dictate how fast a finish needs to be repaired, and a fully covered porch will help a huuuge amount. I'm a proponent of oil finishes outdoors, especially when there's some sun protection. On a covered porch, I've typically used an oil varnish blend that soaks in deeply like tung oil finish or danish oil.

That Works
Jul 21, 2006


Fun Shoe

Leperflesh posted:

lol tracing paper, lol rulers



Just scrawl poo poo in semi-legible pencil and then start working IMO

Why did you steal this off my desk

Rapulum_Dei
Sep 7, 2009


I can tell itís not mine on account of the Liberian measurements. But thatís the only reason.

First Time Caller
Nov 1, 2004



I've bought $1000 of tools to start making furniture for my new house in the basement. I've done a bookcase, planters, and floatings shelves so far with great results, just by watching youtube videos from Woodshop Diaries and Mere Mortals. As I think about working on my next few projects, I find myself wanting to learn to work at a higher quality than most of these Youtube channels instruct at, rather than just pocket hole lovely plywood together and caulk huge gaps from untuned saws/unsquared boxes, and sand stain poly to finish.

What are the recommended instructionals these days (books/dvd/streaming/online classes/ whatever) to help slowly take my very low skill level to something slightly more fine.

Sockser
Jun 28, 2007

OBSERVE



Chris Salamone is not exactly instructional, he puts out build diaries, more or less, but his stuff is probably a good stepping stone from where you're at, maybe

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1...aj764uBis9-UDug

more falafel please
Feb 26, 2005

forums poster

First Time Caller posted:

I've bought $1000 of tools to start making furniture for my new house in the basement. I've done a bookcase, planters, and floatings shelves so far with great results, just by watching youtube videos from Woodshop Diaries and Mere Mortals. As I think about working on my next few projects, I find myself wanting to learn to work at a higher quality than most of these Youtube channels instruct at, rather than just pocket hole lovely plywood together and caulk huge gaps from untuned saws/unsquared boxes, and sand stain poly to finish.

What are the recommended instructionals these days (books/dvd/streaming/online classes/ whatever) to help slowly take my very low skill level to something slightly more fine.

If you don't mind the cost (~$150), The Weekend Woodworker is a great course. It might start at a bit of a lower level than where you're at, but it definitely helps with thinking about ways to plan out your work to fix little inconsistencies like you're talking about.

Leperflesh
May 17, 2007







Smellrose

Just do what I do and spend four months building a shelf for a cat because you're simply not OK with the way the mitered corner trim isn't coming together perfectly flush and then a tiny sliver tore out when you were trying to fix it with your smallest hand plane and you just leave everything in the garage and ignore it for two weeks in a sulk because you don't want to have to peel off the part that is already glued on, until you finally figure out that you can change the angle of the miter in a highly specific kind of weird angle that makes it come together smoothly and nobody will ever notice that the corner is now 2 degrees off from perfectly vertical.

This is the "fine woodworking experience".

Olothreutes
Mar 31, 2007



The Slack Lagoon posted:

I made a little table for our outside covered porch. What's a good finish to put on it to help with being outside?

At the risk of being excommunicated, paint?

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns






First Time Caller posted:

I've bought $1000 of tools to start making furniture for my new house in the basement. I've done a bookcase, planters, and floatings shelves so far with great results, just by watching youtube videos from Woodshop Diaries and Mere Mortals. As I think about working on my next few projects, I find myself wanting to learn to work at a higher quality than most of these Youtube channels instruct at, rather than just pocket hole lovely plywood together and caulk huge gaps from untuned saws/unsquared boxes, and sand stain poly to finish.

What are the recommended instructionals these days (books/dvd/streaming/online classes/ whatever) to help slowly take my very low skill level to something slightly more fine.

What are your ideas for your next few projects? I think learning new skills and techniques is a lot like buying new tools-gear up and study up towards the project you want to do next. Want to make a Windsor chair? Time to learn about turning and staked joinery and steam bending. Want to build a bunch of dressers? Time to learn to build drawers and dovetail. Federal card table? Better learn to veneer and do inlay etc etc.



Olothreutes posted:

At the risk of being excommunicated, paint?
The great irony is that paint is the absolute best finish for wood outside (or honestly inside) and every other clear exterior wood finish wishes it could be 30% as good as paint is at resisting water and the much more important UV damage.

That Works
Jul 21, 2006


Fun Shoe

Leperflesh posted:

Just do what I do and spend four months building a shelf for a cat because you're simply not OK with the way the mitered corner trim isn't coming together perfectly flush and then a tiny sliver tore out when you were trying to fix it with your smallest hand plane and you just leave everything in the garage and ignore it for two weeks in a sulk because you don't want to have to peel off the part that is already glued on, until you finally figure out that you can change the angle of the miter in a highly specific kind of weird angle that makes it come together smoothly and nobody will ever notice that the corner is now 2 degrees off from perfectly vertical.

This is the "fine woodworking experience".

God drat it get out of my head

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HolHorsejob
Mar 13, 2020

In the land of Hyrule, there echoes a legend. A legend held dearly by the Royal Family tells of a boy... A boy who, after battling evil and saving Hyrule, crept away from the land that made him a legend... Done with the battles he once waged across time, he embarked on a journey...


Elysium posted:

I just called my local lumber yard to ask about plywood prices, and they said they had 3/4 Baltic Birch in 5x5 for about $60. Is that a decent price? Actually I canít remember now if he said 49 or 59.

For comparison the best sheet of plywood i can get at HD is about $55 for 4x8 with a thin veneer (not the same as Baltic)

Looks good to me, but it depends on your location and the quality. My lumber yard of choice (hardwood & cabinetry specialist) has 5x5 sheets of 1/2" baltic birch for like $38 for a 5x5 (~$1.50/ft^2) and 4x8 sheets for $90 ($~2.80/ft^2). I think they do 3/4" for about the same as what you got quoted.

I've used both (same machines, cutting tools, setups, toolpaths, feeds/speeds, etc.), and I can say that the results from the more expensive stuff are *vastly* superior. Far less tear-out, better surface finish, much less directionality to the edge finish.

e: this is in the bay area, so probably towards the high end of the price spectrum

HolHorsejob fucked around with this message at 00:07 on Jun 6, 2020

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