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signalnoise
Mar 7, 2008


Mr. Mambold posted:

I don't know any of the specs of that router, but they typically have a rotation speed of 15-20k, which is 10-20 times too fast. If you don't have a variable speed on it or a rheostat, I wouldn't do this. Google wood turning lathe speeds vs. the rpms of that router. It's probably a Bad Idea.

I'm so glad I asked! The specs say 29000 rpm. This thread just probably saved me an injury.

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Leperflesh
May 17, 2007






Also I have (probably the same, if it's pretty new) that 18v cordless palm Ryobi router, and it's fine for what it is, but it is a small, lightweight router and it still uses up a battery in 20m or so of continuous use. You want a corded motor for a lathe.

NomNomNom
Jul 20, 2008
Please Work Out

You can use a router to make dowels. Router gets mounted to a block with a hole, the bit gets lowered through the block so it's just inside the hole, wood gets pushed through. Izzy Swan has a video

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns




CommonShore posted:

When I tried to do that the holes were extremely tight and I was worried that the veneer on the plywood would tear as I was hammering everything into place.

korora posted:

Why not have single piece dowel with copper sleeves only between the shelves? You could drill out your mortises to the dowel diameter and use the copper pipe pieces you already cut as essentially big spacers between shelves and they’d take some of the vertical load.

This is probably the best option. Drilling straight, centered holes on the end of square stuff is hard enough and it's even trickier on round dowels. This may be a frustrating design to get stable. Epoxy is probably your friend for glueing it together. To help with chip out, don't drill all the way through the ply-just let the brad point of the forstner bit poke through and then use that as a center to drill from the other side. You could also sand/countersink a slight bevel around the holes to keep the veneer from chipping, and the pipes should hide it. Commercial dowels are never actually the right size, so you may need to sand them a bit to get them to fit better, or drive them through a dowel plate if you have one.

Mr. Mambold
Feb 13, 2011

Aha. Nice post.





NomNomNom posted:

You can use a router to make dowels. Router gets mounted to a block with a hole, the bit gets lowered through the block so it's just inside the hole, wood gets pushed through. Izzy Swan has a video

Tbf, that guy is brilliant. If you're referring to the 1 1/2" dowel he makes, yeah, that would be a great set of chopsticks or pen blank.


signalnoise posted:

I'm so glad I asked! The specs say 29000 rpm. This thread just probably saved me an injury.

Maybe, maybe not.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=epS8Kb0H-44 So yeah, it's doable. But as you see, he's got a full shop. Madrone is wonderful wood though, shop around for a used mini lathe. They're fun!

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns




signalnoise posted:

I'm so glad I asked! The specs say 29000 rpm. This thread just probably saved me an injury.


Mr. Mambold posted:

Tbf, that guy is brilliant. If you're referring to the 1 1/2" dowel he makes, yeah, that would be a great set of chopsticks or pen blank.


Maybe, maybe not.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=epS8Kb0H-44 So yeah, it's doable. But as you see, he's got a full shop. Madrone is wonderful wood though, shop around for a used mini lathe. They're fun!
Yeah there are lots of ways to use a router to make round stuff but jfc do not try to use a router as the motor and headstock of a lathe.

signalnoise
Mar 7, 2008


Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

Yeah there are lots of ways to use a router to make round stuff but jfc do not try to use a router as the motor and headstock of a lathe.

To be honest, it's another reason I prefer hand tools. I haven't even tried using that router yet. Pretty much anything more than a drill feels extremely dangerous to me. If I do go into lathe stuff, I think I'll just get something intended to be a lathe. Tapered octagonal chopsticks can be made with an angled jig and a plane, and I can sand the tips to be round if I feel like it.

NomNomNom
Jul 20, 2008
Please Work Out

For chopsticks get it close with a plane then just chuck it in the drill and sand it round. Easy and safe.

CommonShore
Jun 6, 2014

A true renaissance man




Thanks for the feedback all. I had already cut the legs before my first post, so that's why I was resistant to going back to the all-through approach. I got my pin holes drilled with a jig and I'm working on my dry fit now. If the dry fit is a bust, I'll go buy fresh dowels for a third time and go that other route.



Learning not failing learning not failing learning not failing.

TooMuchAbstraction
Oct 14, 2012

Hubris

Fun Shoe

CommonShore posted:

Thanks for the feedback all. I had already cut the legs before my first post, so that's why I was resistant to going back to the all-through approach. I got my pin holes drilled with a jig and I'm working on my dry fit now. If the dry fit is a bust, I'll go buy fresh dowels for a third time and go that other route.



Learning not failing learning not failing learning not failing.

I'm sympathetic to the annoyance about having to buy replacement materials. It may help to compare the cost of the materials to the time you're spending on the project. I can pretty much guarantee that the latter's value is waaaay greater than the former's.

serious gaylord
Sep 16, 2007

what.


The lounge bookshelves are finished*

This was my first big project and to be honest my first real attempt at something like this. As I've said before I've worked on very high end woodworking projects but it was always hyper specific parts like RF Veneer pressing and well over a decade ago now so a lot of just basic skills are pretty much brand new to me. If you look closely theres some proper dodgy work in places but also some 'I'm not quite sure how I did that but it works very well' points to it as well. In conclusion my work is a land of contrasts.

For those that haven't been following along, we knocked an archway out in our lounge and then needed a way to divide the room in half. The wife has always wanted a massive set of bookshelves so the project started. I started the framework on Christmas eve and the build was completed about 2 hours ago. Its not completely done, but thats because I don't think I've got enough Osmo poly to do the entire lot and I don't want to swap tins midway. I know they say its all the same but I never trust that. Also the gap to the ceiling will be sorted out when we decide what we want to do with the ceiling. I quite like the idea of a moulding of some sort but the ceiling is all over the place and I don't want to be scribing that all in.

Panorama picture because I literally can't stand anywhere in the room to get it all in one shot.


This really odd size cupboard was a specific request for somewhere to hide the Ironing board & Iron. We can never buy a new ironing board because the space inside is so tight anything slightly wider or taller won't fit. Also very proud of the scribed trim piece there. The dodgyness will be hidden by the doors Architrave when we decide to get that.


Doors are all push to open which I'm a big fan of, I just wish Blum had a way of combining it with a soft close that isn't a servo motor.


Putting that ironing board cupboard in did make this corner unit quite small and a bit pointless as a corner unit. So I switched it to be 2 small bookshelves and reclaimed the corner part to be accessed from the other side for a shelving unit I'm yet to build.


At least I had one straight wall to work off of.


But how do you get to the other part of the room you ask? Well apart from always wanting wall to wall bookshelves, my wife has always, and I mean always, wanted a secret door that opens when you push a specific book on the shelf. And well...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iem8JsjTWm0

Pretty proud of that. Works on an electromagnet with safety releases on both sides of the door, and always fails open so it removes my main fear of doing something like this which is that the locking mechanism would break and I'd have to tear through the bookshelves to get to the other side.

I took step by step photos of this entire process but I don't think this is the right thread to post those. I might do a full build thread if theres any interest?

Mr. Mambold
Feb 13, 2011

Aha. Nice post.





drat nice. I think a full thread would interest a lot of folks who'd love to do something similar, but be intimidated by the sheer magnitude of detail. And not just them.

CommonShore
Jun 6, 2014

A true renaissance man




TooMuchAbstraction posted:

I'm sympathetic to the annoyance about having to buy replacement materials. It may help to compare the cost of the materials to the time you're spending on the project. I can pretty much guarantee that the latter's value is waaaay greater than the former's.

Well here's where I am on it -

I made a jig with my drill press by clamping a 2x4 to my press, drilling a hole with a forstner bit, plonking a chunk of dowel into the hole, swapping bits, and dropping a hole right into the centre. I then hammered that dowel half-way thorough a similar hole in another chunk of wood and used that to line up my end holes.

The dry fit seemed to work so I glued it up. The thing isn't quite square (about 1/8" in 8 inches e. less than that - about 1/2 an inch skew from the top shelf to the bottom one, though the shelves themselves are bang-on level), unfortunately, and I can't get it to shift at all, so that's that. It's solid. We'll see how visible the skew is when I take it out of the clamps tomorrow. If it's hosed, I'll use my forstner bit to drill out the glued dowels, buy four more for the third time, and reassemble as suggested.

The copper and birch look great though

CommonShore fucked around with this message at 21:16 on Apr 6, 2021

more falafel please
Feb 26, 2005

forums poster



Some "it's fine" woodworking:


Planter stand to hold some small containers, replacing a chest-height raised bed that gave us 6 years of loyal service but probably wouldn't have made it another year. Way overbuilt for the weight, but it'll hopefully last a bit longer.

Khizan
Jul 30, 2013




more falafel please posted:

way overbuilt for the weight, but it'll hopefully last a bit longer.

I feel like a defining characteristic of 'It's Fine' woodworking is that it's vastly overbuilt for the weight requirements of the job, because it's all built out of 2xN lumber and scrap plywood.

more falafel please
Feb 26, 2005

forums poster



Khizan posted:

I feel like a defining characteristic of 'It's Fine' woodworking is that it's vastly overbuilt for the weight requirements of the job, because it's all built out of 2xN lumber and scrap plywood.

Yeah, plus I had a bunch of 2x4 around from a bunch of overbuilt shelving I disassembled a while ago, and extra 2x6 from some garden beds last year, and honestly it just takes up so much more space

tracecomplete
Feb 26, 2017



This isn't technically "woodworking" I guess but I feel like the folks here will appreciate it more: I hate pressure treated wood. I'm building a new fence gate and drilling GRK screws into it feels like I'm drilling into cheese and it's faintly disgusting at all times.

tracecomplete fucked around with this message at 01:08 on Apr 7, 2021

Knot My President!
Jan 10, 2005




Hey everyone,

I'm gonna be veneering some speaker cabinets. Any advice on how to smoothly trim around a very slightly recessed speaker hole?



I want something like this:



Also:

1. Would a $40 palm router be sufficient for trimming the veneer overhang? On my last build I used a newly bladed box cutter-- it worked well, but I know it could be better with a router

2. For that open area at the bottom of the speaker, would it be better to attempt to veneer the inside or just paint it black? Seems pretty complex; not sure how to go about it

serious gaylord
Sep 16, 2007

what.


Do the recess and the hole after you've veneered it.

Knot My President!
Jan 10, 2005




Unfortunately I'm getting these cabinets custom CNC'd since I lack woodworking tools to cut them myself. They come flat and I assemble them myself.

serious gaylord
Sep 16, 2007

what.


How deep is the recess? You can get very small trim bits for palm routers but they need a minimum depth for the bearing. I'm trying to think how small the one I used to use for Formica was, it was tiny.

KKKLIP ART
Sep 3, 2004



Does anyone have a good recommendation for eye protection? Specifically something that can go over glasses?

GEMorris
Aug 28, 2002

Glory To the Order!


NomNomNom posted:

Anyone in the northern virginia region? Here's my local lumber store:
Colonial Hardwoods

Here's their price list, which never gets updated.


It is not cheap.

This is aasault

Uthor
Jul 9, 2006

Gummy Bear Heaven ... It's where I go when the world is too mean.

KKKLIP ART posted:

Does anyone have a good recommendation for eye protection? Specifically something that can go over glasses?

Honestly, I'm super happy that I just ponied up the $100.

https://rx-safety.com/

I've heard that Walmart is also a good place to get prescription safety glasses.

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns




Idk how well they go over glasses, but I like the 3M ones that are all clear plastic. Cheap enough that I can have 5 pairs floating around the shop (and still not be able to find any of them)

Uthor posted:

Honestly, I'm super happy that I just ponied up the $100.

https://rx-safety.com/

I've heard that Walmart is also a good place to get prescription safety glasses.
When I worked at a shipyard the really good but crusty 62 yr old fitters and machinists and pipe welders all wore prescription safety glasses with side shields and I can’t wait until my vision gets bad enough that I need prescription safety glasses so I can get some side shields and also look badass.

Rutibex
Sep 9, 2001

Official Forums Path of Exile Expert


KKKLIP ART posted:

Does anyone have a good recommendation for eye protection? Specifically something that can go over glasses?

I've been using one of those covid face shields because I wear glasses so safety glasses over top is annoying

alnilam
Nov 10, 2009


Posting in the springtime


Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

Idk how well they go over glasses, but I like the 3M ones that are all clear plastic. Cheap enough that I can have 5 pairs floating around the shop (and still not be able to find any of them)

When I worked at a shipyard the really good but crusty 62 yr old fitters and machinists and pipe welders all wore prescription safety glasses with side shields and I can’t wait until my vision gets bad enough that I need prescription safety glasses so I can get some side shields and also look badass.

Yeah these ones go over glasses well enough ime

CommonShore
Jun 6, 2014

A true renaissance man




I wear the chonky plastic ones over my glasses and it's fine

Uthor
Jul 9, 2006

Gummy Bear Heaven ... It's where I go when the world is too mean.

CommonShore posted:

I wear the chonky plastic ones over my glasses and it's fine

My eyes would really tire after several hours of this. And it looked stupid. Those combined to make me wear safety glasses as little as possible, for work and when using high speed spinny things. I was hesitant to spend the money on a prescription pair, but since I did, I wear them any time I use a power tool or a hammer or even the weed wacker.

TooMuchAbstraction
Oct 14, 2012

Hubris

Fun Shoe

Rutibex posted:

I've been using one of those covid face shields because I wear glasses so safety glasses over top is annoying

Safety glasses/goggles are rated for impact penetration. Your covid shield is not.

https://twitter.com/tjconnorstweets/status/1082300687034179584

Rutibex
Sep 9, 2001

Official Forums Path of Exile Expert


TooMuchAbstraction posted:

Safety glasses/goggles are rated for impact penetration. Your covid shield is not.

https://twitter.com/tjconnorstweets/status/1082300687034179584

Oh if I'm using something like an angle grinder I'll wear the safety glasses. I mostly just use the face shield to keep sawdust out of my face when I'm sanding.

JEEVES420
Feb 16, 2005

The world is a mess... and I just need to rule it

TooMuchAbstraction posted:

Safety glasses/goggles are rated for impact penetration. Your covid shield is not.

https://twitter.com/tjconnorstweets/status/1082300687034179584

Adding on to this. If you are using the face shield while turning it might keep the chips/dust out of your face but will do gently caress all for a thrown piece. Get a proper face shield, they are cheap.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001VXXUWK/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Bonus, the reviews are hilarious. So many people bitching about them being foggy...take the protective film off before use

GEMorris
Aug 28, 2002

Glory To the Order!


I am afflicted with chunky black plastic eyeglasses due to being a "professional designer" but I found these safety goggles to be careful comfortable over my glasses for extended periods of time.

Knot My President!
Jan 10, 2005




serious gaylord posted:

How deep is the recess? You can get very small trim bits for palm routers but they need a minimum depth for the bearing. I'm trying to think how small the one I used to use for Formica was, it was tiny.

Looks like 4.6mm

Mr. Mambold
Feb 13, 2011

Aha. Nice post.





Knot My President! posted:

Looks like 4.6mm



You'd need a bit with a cutting swath of, what 14mm? 1/2"+-? Whatever the overlay is. It's possible, but that's 1" cutter and the shaft, kind of wide for a palm router. Paint the interior of the missing horn hole black.

Edit- I'd totally expect veneer to splinter or blow up with that. Use a razor.

Leperflesh
May 17, 2007






I agree with Mr. Mambold. I would not want to try to use a trim router on veneer. It might mostly work, or it might splinter and chew and blow out the veneer, and you probably won't know which until you start testing on a test piece (which you should do regardless).

I would build a jig. Before you apply the veneer, and measuring carefully, mark the centerpoint of the circle, and make a good hole. This is the pivot point for your jig, which will be a length of wood (or any stiff material) with a very small, very sharp cutting edge (say, a razor or a craft knife) mounted at the radius of the circle. Affix the jig to the pivot point in a way that lets it pivot, then rotate it as many times as needed to cut slowly and neatly through the veneer.

Since you're doing this exactly twice, ever, this is a better approach than buying a tool you'll never use again; and, you do this before you apply the veneer, so if you gently caress up, you've only wasted a sheet of veneer, and not ruined your speaker.

Knot My President!
Jan 10, 2005




If the depth is 4.6mm, would something like this work?

https://smile.amazon.com/Whiteside-Router-Bits-SC28C-Carbide/dp/B000K2G69M?sa-no-redirect=1

(Apologies on my terminology, I'm very new to this)

4.6mm is ~0.18", so anything less than 11/64" length for a pilot would rest against the countersink and allow cutting of the overhang in the speaker hole, yeah? That bit in the link above is 1/8" / 0.125" / 3.175mm with a 1/4" cutting length. Would this be the solution I'm looking for?

edit: ah, a razor mounted like that is a good idea as well. Gotta do some research into that to see what others have done

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns




Knot My President! posted:

Hey everyone,

I'm gonna be veneering some speaker cabinets. Any advice on how to smoothly trim around a very slightly recessed speaker hole?



I want something like this:



Also:

1. Would a $40 palm router be sufficient for trimming the veneer overhang? On my last build I used a newly bladed box cutter-- it worked well, but I know it could be better with a router

2. For that open area at the bottom of the speaker, would it be better to attempt to veneer the inside or just paint it black? Seems pretty complex; not sure how to go about it
A flush trim bit will do fine on the edges, but I don't think it's going to work on the little recess. Razorblade/X-acto knife is probably the best bet there. It looks like the speaker might cover any rough stuff?

I'd definitely paint the bottom part black.

E:

Knot My President! posted:

If the depth is 4.6mm, would something like this work?

https://smile.amazon.com/Whiteside-Router-Bits-SC28C-Carbide/dp/B000K2G69M?sa-no-redirect=1

(Apologies on my terminology, I'm very new to this)

4.6mm is ~0.18", so anything less than 11/64" length for a pilot would rest against the countersink and allow cutting of the overhang in the speaker hole, yeah? That bit in the link above is 1/8" / 0.125" / 3.175mm with a 1/4" cutting length. Would this be the solution I'm looking for?

edit: ah, a razor mounted like that is a good idea as well. Gotta do some research into that to see what others have done
That bit miiiight work. The problem is you're gonna have glue seepage down in the recess and the bearing part of the flush trim bit will ride against the dried glue not the wood lip. If you veneer with contact cement you may be able to avoid that problem. Either way, flush trim bit in a palm router will work on the edges-I've done it many times- but make sure the glue is really really dry. Give it at least a good 24 hours and go slow. Trim the veneer so it isn't overhanging very much before you flush trim it. I've never veneered with contact cement so idk how well it works there, but as long as you have a really good bond it should be okay. A flush trim bit with a ball bearing is generally better than the kind you linked. Those can mess up the wood they are bearing on, where a ball bearing usually doesn't.

Kaiser Schnitzel fucked around with this message at 16:53 on Apr 7, 2021

Knot My President!
Jan 10, 2005




Thanks for the info! I was planning on using either a heat-lock:

https://www.veneersupplies.com/products/Better-Bond-Heat-Lock-Veneer-Glue.html

Or this cement:

https://www.veneersupplies.com/products/Better-Bond-Titan-DX-Premium-Contact-Cement.html

Not sure if there will be much glue overhang with either option-- I plan on using a hobby knife or other flat surface to clean up the glue drip in the hole before it gets tacky prior to combining

For trimming the sides of the box, I'm definitely gonna get a bearing router bit if I go the palm router route-- that bit above would be for the 4.6mm speaker relief unless I can find a bearing-style that begins the cutting surface shallower than this (< 11/64")

edit: it looks like the site that has the prebuilt speaker cabinet sells the exact router bit I linked above and recommends it for the veneer-- I think this will be my first course of action and if it ends up being a bit too unwieldy then I'll do the hobby knife route. I'll pick up a bearing-style flush trim router bit for the cabinet sides as well

Knot My President! fucked around with this message at 17:30 on Apr 7, 2021

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Elysium
Aug 21, 2003
It is by will alone I set my mind in motion.

more falafel please posted:

Some "it's fine" woodworking:

Oh poo poo, now we’re in my wheelhouse.

I made this stupid thing over the weekend, for putting drinks down on the couch when we want to sit back and can’t reach the table:





Made out of one scrap piece of plywood. I got real impatient with the stain and finishing so that looks a bit half assed. “It’s fine.”

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