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Bonk
Aug 4, 2002

Douche Baggins

Also plowing through B5 over the summer. I made it through the admittedly awful pilot movie without being completely turned off by the show, so if "the first season is slightly better and then the next 4 seasons are awesome" like I've heard, I'll finally see what all the fuss is about.

After that:

The Sopranos: Seen most of season 5 but little of anything else. Tried to get through the first season during the writer's strike. It was just starting to grab me when all my favorite shows came back and the strike ended, so I never finished.

Flight of the Conchords: Never really had much interest in it at first until I heard their hilarious 'Bowie' song. Now I can't wait to check it out.

The original UK Office: I plowed through the entirety of the US version in a week. I should have no trouble with what, 12 episodes and a Christmas special? I can do that in a weekend.

Slings & Arrows: I like Mark McKinney, and I've been meaning to check it out.

The Wire: I'll probably do that sometime this year since the full run just ended. I didn't want to get into it halfway through and then have to wait.

30 Rock: Gave it a chance for about 3 episodes when it premiered, but too many shows premiered that season and I ended up dropping it because it didn't fully grab me. I'll give it another shot eventually. Half-hour comedies are easy as hell to catch up on.


I'll probably come back to this post late in the year and find that I've failed miserably.

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Bonk
Aug 4, 2002

Douche Baggins

Post from June:

Bonk posted:

Babylon 5
The Sopranos (1st season only)
Flight of the Conchords
The original UK Office
Slings & Arrows
The Wire
30 Rock

I'll probably come back to this post late in the year and find that I've failed miserably.
Yup. Pretty much failed miserably, other than Conchords and some of Sopranos. I'm not sure what happened, but I somehow got really busy this summer. Once the fall TV season starts, I give up on catching up to anything until the mid-season hiatus. So it looks like some of these will be my Winter break indulgence, and the rest will have to wait until next summer.

I might still check out the UK Office since it's so short; I still have a week or two before all my fall shows begin again.

Bonk
Aug 4, 2002

Douche Baggins

My only fulfilled goal since my previous post has been The Office UK.

After the May finale season is done, I'm digging into a few I'd planned on getting to last year but fell behind:

The Sopranos: Saw season 5 when it aired, went back and started from the beginning last year, finished season 1 and got too busy to follow up.
Babylon 5: Seen the early stuff, haven't gotten to the really highly acclaimed parts yet.
The Wire: Seen none of it, trying not to let the hype overtake me.
Planetes: Not big on anime, but I love hard sci-fi and it's incredibly scarce in live action.

I estimate by the end of summer I'll have finished at least 2 of the 4.

Also agreeing with the sentiment of not watching Lost until it's over if you've never seen it. You'll miss out on some of the anticipation and theorizing though, which is a lot of the fun of it. Also it's worth it to pay close attention and process each episode a little bit after you've seen it (or even read about it on Lostpedia), because there are a TON of connections and little nods to previous episodes that you'll miss if you're going through at a fast pace.

Bonk fucked around with this message at May 9, 2009 around 17:41

Bonk
Aug 4, 2002

Douche Baggins

Started watching Arrested Development on Hulu, they've got the whole drat series on there. I never watched it until now, partially because up until I watched The Office I didn't like the style it was shot in. Now that I'm used to it, I'm into it. So far the show seems more reliant on awkwardness, but it has a lot of great lines and it's interesting even when it isn't laugh out loud funny (though fortunately it fairly often is). I'm sure people will jump at the chance to say how fantastic it is, but please don't. I'd been hearing massive overhype for the show for years and that's one of the reasons I didn't get into it until now.

Bonk
Aug 4, 2002

Douche Baggins

So over the summer I'm thinking of binging through the entire run of The X-Files and related series. It's been too long since I've seen any episodes and I know I missed quite a few along the way.

I have access to all 9 seasons, both movies, the Lone Gunmen spinoff, and Millennium. I know the first movie should be watched between seasons 5 and 6, and the second movie at the very end, but what about the rest? I know Millennium isn't directly related but it seems to take place in the same universe (before the crossover episode, apparently), and I know the Lone Gunmen takes place somewhere before the end. Any suggestions to exactly when and where those two shows fit with the rest, or should I just go by airdate?

Bonk
Aug 4, 2002

Douche Baggins

FINALLY started my Babylon 5 binge after a few false starts because I didn't have the time. The jump in quality from the pilot movie to the first episode is amazing, both in CG and presentation.

If you can overlook the cheesy presentation and shaky acting, the writing is really good in the first TV episode. The next couple ones after that are somewhat cheesier standalones (the Soul Hunter was a good plot with goofy execution) and I kind of wish JMS put a few arc episodes at the beginning so the series would take off right away, but the standalones aren't bad. Anyway, this was way before serial drama was all the rage, so I can't complain about that too much. I hear the first season isn't that great anyway, but I'm already seeing there's a lot to like if you can get past the very dated feel and look of it.

I'll see if I can get through that by mid-July and then plow through X-Files for the rest. If I have time after that, I'll pick up where I left off on The Sopranos on my last binge attempt.

Bonk
Aug 4, 2002

Douche Baggins

Noxville posted:

I know a lot of people would disagree with me on this, but for me Lost is a show that's best enjoyed over a long time period rather than marathoning it.
Actually, most Lost fans will agree with you on this. You miss a ton of stuff when you watch it all at once. If you can't wait, at least pause between discs to read up a little about each episode to see what other people have spotted. It's not so much like this anymore since the end-date has caused them to tell stories at a much faster pace, but it's still pretty jam-packed with callbacks and literary references and themes that you'd never notice if you breezed through it.

EX-GAIJIN AT LAST posted:

I think this is one of the best arguments for watching the pilot movie. It's all relative.

I didn't even think The Gathering was all that bad, story-wise anyway. The acting was terrible and the effects look straight out of an old Sierra PC game, but it's not a bad story in itself. I think the writing is what's keeping me into it, even if the look of it is pretty weak so far. All I can say is thank god they ditched some of the weaker cast members before fleshing out the rest of the series.


[edit]VVVV I never skip anything anyway, I'm the same way.

Bonk fucked around with this message at Jun 20, 2009 around 03:40

Bonk
Aug 4, 2002

Douche Baggins

Still working my way through Babylon 5 but I'm finding it's not binge-friendly so far, so it's slow going.

I decided I needed a half-hour comedy so I started How I Met Your Mother. Liking it so far and it gets a few good laughs out of me every episode. It's not as consistently hilarious as AD or some of the other comedies I watch but it's funny. My only gripe is that I really hate the laugh track. It's such an outdated thing to use on sitcoms nowadays, and now that I've seen so many well-made comedies without them it's kind of 4th-wall-breaking to watch one again.

[edit]I think I'd like it more if I didn't think Ted was such a douchebag. If he becomes more likeable and/or his personality becomes the butt of jokes I'll enjoy his scenes more. I like the other characters though.

Bonk fucked around with this message at Jul 23, 2009 around 22:30

Bonk
Aug 4, 2002

Douche Baggins

Still plowing through HIMYM and I just got to the "Slap Bet" episode, and read afterward that it's already been revisited in the show. That has to be the greatest subplot ever. Since Marshal apparently has a couple left, I hope the final slap comes in the series finale.

Ted's more tolerable in the second season too. I guess he's less douchey when he has a steady girlfriend.


BostonCreamTerrier posted:

I just started Jericho last night by chance when I was going through Netflix and seeing what was streaming for free. It's addictive as hell, I'm on episode 7 and I can't stop. I'm not a big fan of the Hawkins storyline yet but I'm sticking it out. I know this show ended before it finished its full second season, I'm really hoping they wrap it up and give an acceptable degree of closure rather than an awful cliffhanger with no resolution.
I envy you. If you're addicted by episode 7, holy poo poo. The first block of episodes is the part that most people thought sucked when it was airing, because the network mandated a bunch of family drama. After that they let the writers do their own thing, and generally people considered the good part of the show episode 8 and beyond, all the way up to the end. After that it keeps ramping up the awesomeness and never stops.

And yes, the ending is pretty conclusive. There's definitely room for more, but it resolves itself pretty nicely. The last two episodes in particular are loving amazing. It didn't end before finishing it's "full second season" either; it actually only got a 7-episode order for the second season, so everything is really fast-paced and written tightly. If you like the earliest episodes you're in for a real treat.

Bonk fucked around with this message at Jul 27, 2009 around 07:24

Bonk
Aug 4, 2002

Douche Baggins

Just started season 3 of HIMYM. Season 1 was good and got better toward the end. Season 2 brought it from being a good show to a great show. They added a LOT more running jokes (sandwiches instead of weed is currently my favorite), and the callbacks to previous episodes and plots are excellent (slap bet in particular). My little gripes about it are pretty much gone too, I don't mind Ted or the laugh track anymore.

I also keep spotting stuff hidden in the background, like how Barney's revenge play was called "Suck It Lily" on the playbill but was never mentioned in the show, and how in Marshal's future scene where he opens the death letter there's a headline in the background that says "Lawyer finds Nessie".



\/\/\/That post is a lot funnier if you read it as a response to this one at first, like I just did.

Bonk fucked around with this message at Jul 29, 2009 around 06:57

Bonk
Aug 4, 2002

Douche Baggins

The Duke posted:

One of my favorite cutaways in the whole show so far is when it cuts to Marshall giggling with a 2 foot sub sandwich in his hands. I think that was in the second season?

There might be another one that far back, but I know there's a way more recent one because I'm already up to season 4 and I just saw it. It's in the fight episode when Marshall and Ted are watching a kung-fu movie in college.

Bonk
Aug 4, 2002

Douche Baggins

metachronos posted:

and it has Ron loving Perlmann.

Keep watching. Second season will have Henry loving Rollins.

Bonk
Aug 4, 2002

Douche Baggins

tastychicken posted:

The pace in Sopranos is up and down all the time.

I was all over the place with watching parts of the show. First I saw a couple season 3 episodes, then all of season 5 and about half of season 6 when they aired. Last year I borrowed the DVDs for season 1 and watched all of that. I started into season 2 and stopped to watch other shows, and never really went back.

I realize it was an important show that paved the way for a lot of other great television, and I appreciate what it did for popular culture. But I came to the conclusion that I didn't really like the characters, and wouldn't have missed the show when it was over. Maybe someday I'll go back and watch the whole thing end to end, but for now I'm putting it way on the back burner. I have a lot more shows I'd like to watch before it.

Bonk
Aug 4, 2002

Douche Baggins

Most people I've seen that still claim Lost is making it up as it goes along stopped watching around season 2 or 3. They've gone a long way since then to show that they really have been planting seeds for later seasons.

Regardless, I don't get why people only seem to care about the mystery. Yes they raise a lot of questions but those answers are doled out on a steady, gradual basis. Most of the complaining is about wanting big answers to the biggest questions (which we're not getting all at once either). The tipping point of that was after the halfway mark, I would say. If you only ever watch shows or films for the reveals or big twist endings, maybe you should just rent a Shyamalan film and fast-forward to the last 5 minutes.


Ishamael posted:

I could not disagree with this post more. I have never been as invested in characters as I was in that show, I really feel that they are written as well as anything has ever been written for television or film.
I never said anything about the writing; the characters are written extremely well. That doesn't mean I like them.

Bonk
Aug 4, 2002

Douche Baggins

Leviathan posted:

I don't think you made it past the 'Flight 815 Survivors' section (and if you did but you don't care about the Others/Island questions then we must not be watching the same show).
Wow, you really think so? The vast majority of those questions are either already given heavy implication, are BIG answers forthcoming, or nobody cares. The big stuff is leaked out slowly and will continue to be, while the small stuff is nitpicky fan questions. They didn't bite off more than they could chew with the big mysteries, they're steadily hitting those on all points. For example we learn something new about the monster every time we see it. As for the Others/Island sections on that page:

Why is the Swan ladder broken?
How did Karl and Alex got together?
Why is the Hydra on the other island?
Where is Radzinsky buried?
Why is there a blah blah logo on the hurf durf door?

The answer to all of these is "who gives a poo poo". And this is coming from a lore nerd.

Ishamael posted:

Just finished Jekyll last week. Glad you guys recommended it. The final episode was great. When the new title card came up I got all revved up.
My favorite part of the entire series was when they had the entire training montage and backstory for the super soldier guy, and then the hilarious confrontation.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P2N1-e6Kwkg

Bonk fucked around with this message at Aug 12, 2009 around 03:52

Bonk
Aug 4, 2002

Douche Baggins

I got 3 seasons of The IT Crowd from a friend and enjoyed the first episode pretty much. How consistently funny is it, and would it make a good marathon show or does it tend to wear thin after too much at once?

Also saw 3/5 of the Torchwood miniseries and hoping to get to the rest this week. It's loads better than some of the early writing; less of the deliberate cheese and more high budget action.





Leviathan posted:

Bonk I swear you are the king of the Lost apologists. Jack could take a steaming dump on Locke's chest and you'd be eating it up as preplanned.
Uh, blow me? I think the Bai Ling episode sucked too, and that Kate is boring, and that Jack's been a wet blanket all season. I just tend not to talk about things that suck as much as things that I like so I don't come off as a negative pissburger.

Bonk fucked around with this message at Aug 15, 2009 around 08:28

Bonk
Aug 4, 2002

Douche Baggins

It very specifically hits its peak early in season 3. Everyone who's seen it knows what I mean.

Don't base your opinion on an internet thread. The internet hates everything. Don't base your opinion on the finale either, it split the fanbase in half. You're missing out by never wanting to watch it just based on two pretty lame criteria. It has its lulls and it can drag sometimes, but when it's great, it's some of the best TV you'll ever see.

Bonk
Aug 4, 2002

Douche Baggins

I can understand that, but although the end is polarizing, plenty of people liked it a lot. This thread really is a poor example though. When you don't have to wait over a year between seasons and a week or two between episodes it really does gel together a lot better.

The only thing I'll say about the ending is that it gives you a conflict resolution first, then a character resolution second, and finally a mythology resolution. Most people liked the first, some were iffy about the second, and VERY split on the third. I'll admit they were less subtle about it toward the end in an attempt to write everything in together though.

Fortunately, if you got bored in the middle of season 4, there's a fantastic reveal in the mid-season finale episode that could serve as a huge downer ending if you didn't want to continue. But there's some great stuff after that too.

Bonk
Aug 4, 2002

Douche Baggins

I got through Babylon 5's first season on writing alone. Ignore the acting and characterization for the early stuff. The ongoing plot threads are really interesting and even the one-offs are pretty well written.

Bonk
Aug 4, 2002

Douche Baggins

^^^Check out Andy Richter Controls the Universe if you haven't already. More on the surreal end, but I didn't realize until rewatching it years later that most of the cast were total dicks to each other.

Jedi posted:

Also, in re: laugh tracks - both The Honeymooners and I Love Lucy are two of the greatest comedies ever written and both hadw laughter.
I don't really think this is an apt comparison. Nobody cared in the 50s, especially since in the TV market they were more or less the only game in town. Both also had live studio audiences, where HIMYM is taped on soundstages and location shoots, then shown to an audience whose reactions are recorded.

I got used to it in HIMYM after the first handful of episodes or so, and I barely notice it anymore, but I still could do without it. Even if I don't notice it or mind it, it doesn't add anything to the show.

Leviathan posted:

drat everyone keeps talking about the ending and I want to see it now...5th season is so far away at this point. Also, unless the ending is sadder than Life is Beautiful + Schindler's List + What Dreams May Come + Of Mice and Men put together, I'm probably not gonna be shedding any tears.
Take all of those and mash them up into a slow, growing pile of misery and sadness. That's seasons 4 and 5.

The 4th season premiere in particular is completely gut-wrenching. Everyone harps on the finale, which IS excellent, but the final scene of 401 and something else that happens a few episodes before the finale make for some of the most unfathomably dark TV I've ever seen.

Bonk
Aug 4, 2002

Douche Baggins

doctor thodt posted:

Well a cursory glance at your post history shows entries in the threads for Smallville and Prison Break so I guess there's no sense in arguing with you about it.
A cursory glance at simple memory shows that you don't like anything and never budge from your opinions in the slightest, so there's no sense in arguing with you either.


However, anyone who says all TV is any less than 99% poo poo isn't watching ALL TV. A lot of fantastic primetime shows don't cancel out hundreds of channels of pure poo poo. Not watching them doesn't make them cease to exist, but they FAR outweigh the good. There probably hasn't been a time since the 60s when you could call most of the programming on TV "good", due to sheer volume of filler we've come up with since television started 24-hour programming.

Bonk fucked around with this message at Sep 23, 2009 around 15:01

Bonk
Aug 4, 2002

Douche Baggins

Fringe: Binged through seasons 1 and 2, just catching up on the last few episodes of 3 now. It started slow, but I love that all of the things that seemed to be standalone eventually turned out to be part of a bigger arc. Season 2 kept getting better, and season 3 just shifts gears into pure awesome, especially now that we're getting entire episodes on the 'other side'. I think the similarity with The X-Files kind of ends at FBI agents investigating cases of weird, unexplained things. X-Files was supernatural, aliens, ghost, etc. Fringe is and always has been science gone wrong. Really impressed with actor's abilities to portray two very different characters too.

Life on Mars (UK): I like the mystery angle of it, but it's a little too few and far between. Otherwise it often seems like a police procedural with 70s references and "we don't have that yet" thrown in. Still intriguing, but I'm kind of waiting for things to pick up a bit. I like the characters though.

Curb Your Enthusiasm: Just started watching from the beginning. I'd only seen a few later episodes before, and the early stuff just isn't all that funny, just awkward. The ones I've seen were probably from 4th or 5th season, and were much funnier. I know it started in 2000 and now comes off as a little dated, but can anyone tell me when it really hits its stride?

Bonk
Aug 4, 2002

Douche Baggins

Vanderdeath posted:

I'm also interested in Parks and Recreation, but I've heard that the first season is pretty lousy. Should I skip the first season and hop into the second or just try and power through season one as quickly as possible?

Another vote for "just watch it". Six episodes will take you just over two hours. It's not terrible, there just aren't a lot of laugh-out-loud funny moments. It's still amusing though, and it sets up who the characters are and what they want to accomplish in the 2nd season, so it's worth it. I noticed a major shift in comedic writing around the episode where Louis CK's character shows up. After that, I can't think of an unfunny episode.

Doctor Spaceman posted:

About halfway through the first season of Fringe. I'm enjoying it, but nothing's really stood out as being particularly fantastic so far. Still having a gut "that's ridiculous!" reaction to most of the mysteries of the week.

I've heard awesome things about the more recent seasons, which is really the only reason I'm sticking with it. When does it go from decent to great?

Two things start getting way better: One, the character arcs become more serialized than the mysteries, so there's technically no standalone episodes that don't deal with some ongoing arc. Two, you start realizing that experiments from early episodes are being used wide-scale elsewhere for very specific reasons, in a way that ties the show together nicely. It sets up its questions and mysteries, then pays them off steadily.

Season 1 gets better through the whole ZFT arc, then really picks up around the season finale. Season 2 starts off strong, meanders a little, then picks up around the middle. Once you get to 'Jacksonville' (2x15), it hits a stride and never really loses it. Late season 2 to mid season 3 is pretty consistently fantastic. Later on it gets a bit experimental, but if you're not afraid to let the show try new things, it's still a lot of fun. Then the last block of episodes comes around and totally mindfucks you.

Bonk fucked around with this message at Jun 16, 2011 around 21:32

Bonk
Aug 4, 2002

Douche Baggins

Yeah, I'm starting up The Wire, possibly Carnivale too if I have time before the Fall season starts (or if the 10 or so pilots I want to check out all end up sucking), but I have to admit The Wire is pretty intimidating. It's dense as hell, it gets top acclaim everywhere, and I feel like I need to be able to immerse myself in it to really get it. I hope I like it as much as everyone else seems to. I'm going into it with the understanding that it's like reading a novel, and I'm okay with that. [edit]Haha, just realized I've been telling this thread I was going to start The Wire for 3 years now. It's finally time![/edit]

And not to intentionally reheat the Veronica Mars derail, but it's much, much harder to get into that show if you don't already like Kristen Bell. I personally don't, as every role I've seen her in annoys me and I don't find her cute and charming like the show's fans seem to, so her relentless snarkiness and spring-loaded comebacks in VM do nothing for me. I've tried. It might be a well-written show, but I'd never know because I don't like the protagonist or the actress that plays her. It would also take a lot to get me to watch a teen-oriented high school drama at this point in my life. My girlfriend's getting me to watch Freaks & Geeks though, so I'll give that a shot at least.

Bonk fucked around with this message at Aug 7, 2011 around 18:55

Bonk
Aug 4, 2002

Douche Baggins

Started up Freaks & Geeks for the first time.

Watching Ben Foster in the pilot is amazing if you've ever seen him in anything else. The guy's got some serious range. I wish he'd pick better movies to be in.

Bonk
Aug 4, 2002

Douche Baggins

DominoDancing posted:

Be warned though, season 3 also has one or two of the most despised episodes of the show. I guess you'll know them when you see them.

Then again, season 3 also has the best season finale I have ever seen. Lost might not be the best show ever, and season 3 might not be the best season of a show ever, but that finale is something else.

EDIT: By the way, I'm pretty sure the whole "end date" thing wasn't negotiated until later in the season. Wikipedia seems to back me up on that.


Stranger In A Strange Land was after the break.

Yeah. Obviously they don't write and shoot TV shows in real-time; that episode was already in the can while they were still meandering. It was just an indirect example of how the network was forcing them to stretch things out and come up with answers to mysteries that don't matter. Season 3 just started with a mini-arc in the beginning because they chose to split the season up that way, since everyone was getting pissy about the scheduling being a few weeks on, a few weeks off, and wanted it to run straight through. Then viewers complained about that too.

The third season has some of the show's best though, especially toward the end (The Brig is one of my favorites).

Exposť is polarizing, but I love it. It's a hilarious, awesome, and totally macabre conclusion to two wedged-in redshirt characters.

Bonk
Aug 4, 2002

Douche Baggins

For those struggling through the first season of Fringe, you don't really realize just how much they've been building on the main arc until you catch up and look back (the amber-filled bus in the 3rd episode, for example). They do sprinkle big mythology episodes in with the rest though, like episodes 7, 10, 14, 17, and 20. The first season's slow burn of the overarching plot is definitely one of its faults, but by the end of the 2nd season that problem is all but gone. Just be prepared, later on the show likes to experiment with new things, and not all of them quite work. By that point you'll learn to expect some campiness though, but it comes off as charming if you don't take it too seriously.

precision posted:

The only reason I have a hard time recommending Lost to anyone is that, while it was great and I was a raging fanboy the entire time (but especially seasons 4-6), pretty much immediately after it was over I forgot about it. And I'm not one of those "the ending was so disappointing" people exactly, it just... I don't know, it seems like almost nothing in the show ended up mattering. And it's a really long show to recommend to someone who might feel like I did, that they basically wasted 100+ hours on something they'll never even think of again.

Yeah, I was huge on it, recommending it to everyone, and I wasn't all that big on season 6 but I stuck with it until the end. Then once it ended I was just sort of like "Welp, that sure was a show." I still like it, but I don't revere it nearly the way I did when it was on. I'm eventually going to try to check out the Chronologically Lost edits once some time has passed though.

Fringe has more or less replaced my craving for weird, serialized mythology.

Bonk
Aug 4, 2002

Douche Baggins

DarkCrawler posted:

I don't know, I really like those actors and I'm glad they're getting a lot of work! Though s so much sci-fi Canadian or are a lot of things just filmed in Vancouver for some reason? Not that I can tell the difference between Canadian or American actors
There's a huge Vancouver film industry, and it's way cheaper to film here: American filmmakers get tax breaks and can benefit from the exchange rate of the US dollar, so if you can move production north of the border, you can stretch your budget a lot more.

As for sci-fi specifically, it's a niche genre so it often benefits a TV show to convince networks that it's cheap to film. A network or cable channel might not think twice about greenlighting sitcoms and and lawyer/medical/cop procedurals filmed in LA/New York/Chicago because it's a proven formula. Sci-fi tries to break the mold so it's 'safer' to film where it's cheaper. Though plenty of sci-fi is also filmed in Toronto.

Personally, I like seeing the same Vancouver actors in a lot of sci-fi shows because I know several of them and it's awesome to see them succeed.

Bonk
Aug 4, 2002

Douche Baggins

Inspector 34 posted:

I think Vancouver is just fine as long as they're not trying to pretend it's someplace else.
This is a good commentary on it. Great Youtube channel in general too: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ojm74VGsZBU

quote:

For those of you more familiar with Vancouver, does it ever bother you when you see Vancouver buildings/landmarks knowing the program is set elsewhere?
I'm used to it at this point; it looks like Anytown USA because there's a lot of diverse architecture and terrain. It's kind of nice to see things that aren't just LA or NYC where they shoot practically everything else. Sometimes it's fun to spot certain landmarks and intersections I know well. It breaks the 4th wall a bit, but since I work in the industry I've already kind of passed that point where I think in terms of production anyway.

I will say both Fringe and Battlestar Galactica hid this extremely well. Fringe would CG in background landmarks of where the location was supposed to be, like NYC buildings in the skyline when the shoot was in downtown Vancouver. BSG had the SFU campus and parts of downtown as Caprica, but stuff like the algae planet was filmed up in Kamloops where there's actual desert a few hours drive away, and a lot of the rest was shot up in the mountains.

Bonk
Aug 4, 2002

Douche Baggins

Jose Valasquez posted:

Everyone who thinks she was lying are making good points.

I'm still going to believe she was telling the truth though because that makes a better story
I'm more inclined to believe her because of what Lindelof said about them being 100% on the side of her really going there and planning to film it, then gradually shifting to ambiguity with Nora telling it. He never says it's a lie, only that they started at 100 and ended up 50/50. Carrie Coon also played it as truth and said she believed Nora. So the intention had always leaned more towards truth, but they decided to leave the audience's interpretation open so there's no right or wrong answer. So speaking from a screenwriter's perspective, it makes more sense to me that it's true in the writer's room but they decided to satisfy both sides of the argument in actual production.

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Bonk
Aug 4, 2002

Douche Baggins

An Ounce of Gold posted:

Just a tangent here but on the other side of the ocean I think there was a short run where different comedy troupes actually tried to pick up the Monty Python ball. In the 80s we had The Kids in the Hall, the 90s had The State and Mr Show, and then The Whitest Kids You Know.

I know they aren't all like Python, but they each held their own in terms of witty comedy. My question is... Where's the next high energy smart yet dumb humor sketch show? I feel like it's been years since one has stood out in that vein. I mean TWKYK ended in 2011 already. It's been 7 years since there's been a stand out skit show right?
Key & Peele? Portlandia? Both are more recent, and just as absurdist as your other examples.

But you also have to consider that Youtube and social media exploded within the last decade, and it became far easier and more economical to put sketches online than try to get a pilot greenlit. I was in a sketch troupe for a few years and we just did online clips and local live shows, but it's hard to sustain unless you're really great at self-promoting or someone discovers you. WKUK got their start that way too.

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