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Brekelefuw
Dec 16, 2003
I Like Trumpets


I never though of that.

Time to buy an indicator! hurray

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NitroSpazzz
Dec 8, 2006

You don't need style when you've got strength!




AbsentMindedWelder posted:

I found a Safety-Kleen unit on Craigslist for $125

Quoting and old post but how much floor space does this thing take up and how big is the working area? I have a bunch of car parts (whole front & rear subframe, suspension, engine) that I want to clean up before repainting and reinstalling and I'm thinking a parts washer like that might be my best option. This one popped up on craigslist and I'm tempted to go pick it up - http://knoxville.craigslist.org/tls/3766443533.html

Otherwise I'm not sure what the best way to clean all this stuff is going to be.

iForge
Oct 28, 2010

Apple's new "iBlacksmith Suite: Professional Edition" features the iForge, iAnvil, and the iHammer.

NitroSpazzz posted:

Quoting and old post but how much floor space does this thing take up and how big is the working area? I have a bunch of car parts (whole front & rear subframe, suspension, engine) that I want to clean up before repainting and reinstalling and I'm thinking a parts washer like that might be my best option. This one popped up on craigslist and I'm tempted to go pick it up - http://knoxville.craigslist.org/tls/3766443533.html

Otherwise I'm not sure what the best way to clean all this stuff is going to be.

That one appears to be the exact same size as AMW's. I believe it is a 30 gallon drum that the washing tub sits on top of. I'd say his is about 32 inches wide and 24 inches deep, but that's an estimate based on using it once.

iForge fucked around with this message at May 27, 2013 around 17:49

AbsentMindedWelder
Mar 26, 2003

It must be the fumes.

The epoxy on the cardboard where I mixed it up dried up just fine, unlike last time, so I assume the belt should be OK. I'll leave the clamps on until I'm ready to install the spindle.

NitroSpazzz posted:

Quoting and old post but how much floor space does this thing take up and how big is the working area?

Otherwise I'm not sure what the best way to clean all this stuff is going to be.

Mine is 31" wide, 20" deep, and 35" high. It is worth every penny... it is your best way to clean parts.

COOL CORN
Jun 1, 2003




Buglord

I was out working in the forge today, got the fire just right, had a long bar of carbon steel, drew out a tang, spent a long time cutting the blade to length because my chisel wasn't cooperating, and then..... couldn't find my tongs so i couldn't do anything else with it

Now I have a roughly shaped knife blank sitting there waiting for me to find my tongs or any sort of long gripper things.

COOL CORN fucked around with this message at May 27, 2013 around 20:27

ductonius
Apr 9, 2007
I heard there's a cream for that...

AbsentMindedWelder posted:

It is worth every penny... it is your best way to clean parts.

This is the truth. The shop I work at has one filled with mineral spirits. A black, caked on combination of concrete dust and release oil covers nearly everything that comes into the shop for repair. Everything gets degrease in there and after a quick blow from an air hose is clean and dry.

Ambrose Burnside
Aug 29, 2007

pensive


that happened to me last week when I was makin' tool steel punches, it was a good thing vice-grips did the trick (and they oughta, they were invented by a blacksmith).

AbsentMindedWelder
Mar 26, 2003

It must be the fumes.

I took this pic right after taking apart the spindle again. I wanted to get the parts cleaner. The spindle threads and the inside taper got two coats of naval jelly. The pulley cone I took a wire wheel in an angle grinder too then gave it some naval jelly too. The back gear got the full treatment as well.



In this pic you can see that I've set the spindle in the headstock and installed the bearing caps.

I decided to replace the thrust washer with a needle roller thrust bearing I got from McMaster. It is a little bit thicker but not much and there is plenty of room for the gear.



iForge was over and assisted by cutting a piece of pipe and two pieces of flat bar so I could use a piece of all thread to press the spindle gear on.

The serpentine belt seems to have cured up properly. I will give it a full 24+ hours to cure however, before I attempt to run the machine.



I also got the tailstock assembled.

All the mechanical bits are done! All that's left is some more paint touch-ups, bolt the covers on, buy push button switches, and mount/wire the VFD!

It's a relief to not have lathe parts scattered around the garage and basement and no longer having to worry about losing a part and making sure everything gets puts back together right!

Slung Blade
Jul 10, 2002

IN STEEL WE TRUST



Oh man, so so close.

What are you going to turn on it first?

Brekelefuw
Dec 16, 2003
I Like Trumpets

AbsentMindedWelder posted:

I took this pic right after taking apart the spindle again. I wanted to get the parts cleaner. The spindle threads and the inside taper got two coats of naval jelly. The pulley cone I took a wire wheel in an angle grinder too then gave it some naval jelly too. The back gear got the full treatment as well.



In this pic you can see that I've set the spindle in the headstock and installed the bearing caps.

I decided to replace the thrust washer with a needle roller thrust bearing I got from McMaster. It is a little bit thicker but not much and there is plenty of room for the gear.



iForge was over and assisted by cutting a piece of pipe and two pieces of flat bar so I could use a piece of all thread to press the spindle gear on.

The serpentine belt seems to have cured up properly. I will give it a full 24+ hours to cure however, before I attempt to run the machine.



I also got the tailstock assembled.

All the mechanical bits are done! All that's left is some more paint touch-ups, bolt the covers on, buy push button switches, and mount/wire the VFD!

It's a relief to not have lathe parts scattered around the garage and basement and no longer having to worry about losing a part and making sure everything gets puts back together right!




Unf that is a beauty.
What are the specs on it? Distance between centers etc?

AbsentMindedWelder
Mar 26, 2003

It must be the fumes.

Slung Blade posted:

Oh man, so so close.

What are you going to turn on it first?

I'm not sure yet. Got plenty of time to think about that while I work on the milling machine.

Brekelefuw posted:

Unf that is a beauty.
What are the specs on it? Distance between centers etc?
It's a 13" swing and 26" between centers. Don't have the swing above saddle handy. 1 HP 3 phase motor. It's shipping weight in the crate would have been around 1300 lbs.

Ambrose Burnside
Aug 29, 2007

pensive


Burnishers: they both giveth AND taketh away scratches, if you're not careful.

Brekelefuw
Dec 16, 2003
I Like Trumpets

Ambrose Burnside posted:

Burnishers: they both giveth AND taketh away scratches, if you're not careful.

You should see the look on someone's face when the rolling burnisher they are using on a flute slips and leaves a nice gouge in the silver.

The non rolling burnishers I use are work all have pointed tips. I also only use no rolling burnishers on the bell curve of bras instruments, and it is always scary when doing the finishing touches on a nice horn. I always coat my burnishers in lanolin to help them glide and not scratch the lacquer.

Ambrose Burnside
Aug 29, 2007

pensive


I was using it to clean up a pendant, a wee small cousin of the big W I posted earlier, and Of Course put a nice deep scratch down the to-be-polished face.

...which I spent way too long trying to solder bails to and eventually gave up on and punched holes at the corners to string the chain to directly, normally I can silver-solder just fine but the surface was irregular and too thin to file down and my torch was actin' up and I was just off my game in general and got nothin but overheating and failing joints and nothing cooperating at all. Woulda looked nicer with bails, too, but I'm runnin outta time and cleared it with the commissioning friend beforehand, so *shrugs* some days are frustrating.

Not an Anthem
Apr 27, 2003

I'm a fucking pain machine and if you even touch my fucking car I WILL FUCKING DESTROY YOU.


Ambrose can you post a desktop porn sized version of your lathe photos? That thing is gorgeous, you did killer work on it.

Ambrose Burnside
Aug 29, 2007

pensive


Lathe aint mine

AbsentMindedWelder
Mar 26, 2003

It must be the fumes.

Tool post, 4 jaw chuck are cleaned up, and the covers are bolted on. Still need some touch up paint, clean up and install the decals, VFD mounted, and purchase tooling.

Still looking around for push button switches. Not only are they expensive, the selection is a bit overwhelming. I'll probably install the old drum switch until I figure out exactly what I want.



Not an Anthem posted:

AMW can you post a desktop porn sized version of your lathe photos? That thing is gorgeous, you did killer work on it.

Once I get the chance to take some proper pics, and move the milling machine pedestal that's in my way of getting good camera angles, I will post some larger resolution photos.

Slung Blade
Jul 10, 2002

IN STEEL WE TRUST



AbsentMindedWelder posted:

Tool post, 4 jaw chuck are cleaned up, and the covers are bolted on. Still need some touch up paint, clean up and install the decals, VFD mounted, and purchase tooling.

Still looking around for push button switches. Not only are they expensive, the selection is a bit overwhelming. I'll probably install the old drum switch until I figure out exactly what I want.




Once I get the chance to take some proper pics, and move the milling machine pedestal that's in my way of getting good camera angles, I will post some larger resolution photos.

Looking good man.



Anyone used a miller diversion 165? I need something for sheet metal and automotive stuff. Plus having a good tig machine around would be nice.

I'm not really enthusiastic about hooking up my Longevity unit for that application because it's so handy as a portable arc welder. Also it's DC only.

AbsentMindedWelder
Mar 26, 2003

It must be the fumes.

Slung Blade posted:

Anyone used a miller diversion 165? I need something for sheet metal and automotive stuff. Plus having a good tig machine around would be nice.

The diversion is attractive, but everything I've read has said you'll be much happier with a Syncrowave or Dynasty. I tend to agree. Best to save the beans and get a better machine.

Slung Blade
Jul 10, 2002

IN STEEL WE TRUST



AbsentMindedWelder posted:

The diversion is attractive, but everything I've read has said you'll be much happier with a Syncrowave or Dynasty. I tend to agree. Best to save the beans and get a better machine.

I would love one of those but I can in no way justify 4 grand for a unit that I'm going to have to drop another couple hundred on just to be able to use it.

If I was a pro Fab shop or something, sure, I'd definitely get one of those high end units. For an occasional use hobby machine, I'd like to keep my costs under 2k if at all possible.

AbsentMindedWelder
Mar 26, 2003

It must be the fumes.

I know the used equipment isn't as plentifully in your area, but I picked up my Syncrowave for $1k. Throw a wanted ad up on craigslist... I've had better luck with wanted ads for welding machine shopping then searching through tools section.

The Dynasty is shipable if you find one used on ebay. Also, contact your local welding shop... sometimes they sell used equipment.

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


You'll lose out on pulse, but if you go transformer instead of inverter you can get a shitload of welder for not much money.

We picked up a Miller 330 AB/P for $800 with a big bottle of argon and an aircooled 17 torch. It's more or less the most beloved of transformer tig machines and they're plentiful and cheap, not hard to find for a grand.

AbsentMindedWelder
Mar 26, 2003

It must be the fumes.

Hypnolobster, dunno if you saw my reply after your last post, but could you supply the info regarding the part numbers for the diodes you put in the Idealarc, and where you purchased them?

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


AbsentMindedWelder posted:

Hypnolobster, dunno if you saw my reply after your last post, but could you supply the info regarding the part numbers for the diodes you put in the Idealarc, and where you purchased them?

I missed that, apparently.


I don't have any exact numbers, but I've got a picture and a vague numbers.



We used 150a 600v stud mount diodes (I believe all IdealArcs of this particular era are soldered diodes from the factory) You need two diodes of each mount position (cathode stud or anode stud). I got them off of eBay for $18ish from this guy http://myworld.ebay.com/powermaxusa/
150KR60A anode + on the stud (reversed)
150K60A anode + on the tail (forward/straight)

The plate facing the camera has the positive studs, the rear plate has the positive tails. There are center straps inside that are supplying two legs of AC, and each strap is connected to a pair of diodes of opposite polarity, two diodes of the same polarity are connected to one of the output plates


That said I am going off of memory and old eBay emails, and I forgot essentially everything about rectifier circuits so don't take this as advice.

Hypnolobster fucked around with this message at May 31, 2013 around 02:10

Vindolanda
Feb 13, 2012

It's just like him too, y'know?


Sure the Dynasty's good, but if you're serious about quality you'll get a machine with a higher mpm rating and really crank out those margs.

Chauncey
Sep 16, 2007

Gibbering
Fathead




AbsentMindedWelder, I thought you might enjoy seeing another fine restoration job of a South Bend. http://joplin.craigslist.org/tls/3840556862.html

rotor
Jun 11, 2001

Official Carrier
of the Neil Bush Torch

 
 
 
 
teh butts


Brekelefuw
Dec 16, 2003
I Like Trumpets

Holy crap. That thing is so perfect, I wouldn't want to use it. I just want to stare at it.

Chauncey
Sep 16, 2007

Gibbering
Fathead




Yeah, I can't even imagine the amount of hours he has in to that thing. I'd be much happier paying $5k for that than I would be paying $5k for a new Grizzly South Bend.

Uncle Enzo
Apr 28, 2008


Chauncey posted:

AbsentMindedWelder, I thought you might enjoy seeing another fine restoration job of a South Bend. http://joplin.craigslist.org/tls/3840556862.html

Oh my god that is gorgeous. I'm getting some serious lathe-envy over here. 5K seems like a reasonable price, honestly.

vvv Good to know. I guess that shows what I know about lathe restoration (nothing) vvv

Uncle Enzo fucked around with this message at Jun 1, 2013 around 14:07

AbsentMindedWelder
Mar 26, 2003

It must be the fumes.

I saw that lathe posted elsewhere. There is clearly no doubt it has excellent cosmetics. I do believe, however it is priced quite high, and has a suspicious nature about it. First, for what is advertised and priced as fully tooled it seems to be lacking the steady rest, follower rest, and taper attachment.

What is more suspicious however is the scraping job and that it's being advertised as 100% restored. There are a few people out there who do this work and are very well known, and quite trustworthy. They need only put their name behind it. There are other people yet who are very good at scraping, but don't sell their services and tend to do it only to their machines, which they may sell eventually, but not before putting some use on it. You can hire companies to do this, but at a very high premium that makes selling a machine for profit difficult.

This machine has not been used post restore and clearly was restored with the intent of selling for profit. The ad is too wordy with too much hype. The machine should sell itself without the help of any marketing fluff.

That all being said, the pictures are fun to look at, but I would say this is a big buyer beware.

AbsentMindedWelder fucked around with this message at Jun 1, 2013 around 14:07

AbsentMindedWelder
Mar 26, 2003

It must be the fumes.

This lathe (which is not for sale) is a good example of what a real restoration done by a true master looks like. If you ever see Dennis Turk selling a machine, but it as fast as you can.

Note the pile of change gears on the floor and the automotive quality finish on the compound rest.

Chauncey
Sep 16, 2007

Gibbering
Fathead




That is a hilarious post and all I can say is that if you think scraping is a black art unknown to but a few well-known masters, you are horribly misinformed; and unless the man values his time at a couple bucks per hour he is certainly not making a profit at $5k. More likely to get his asking price from a collector.

I did lol at the completely superfluous flaking on top of the compound though.

Lord Gaga
May 9, 2010

by T. Finninho


I would put that lathe in my house or man cave or something and then have a real lathe in my garage. I hate that style fo toolpost/holder for actually doing stuff though. Terrible design.

AbsentMindedWelder
Mar 26, 2003

It must be the fumes.

Chauncey posted:

if you think scraping is a black art unknown to but a few well-known masters, you are horribly misinformed
No, I don't think that at all. However, scraping a lathe bed that has 3 inverted V ways and 1 flat way making for 7 total surfaces that have to be kept perfectly parallel, even, and level takes some very good quality instrumentation, precision straight edges, very well thought out and planned technique, and countless hours of tedious labor.

I was also alluding to all the machining and part making that has to be involved as well, besides the scraping. All of it is a lot of work that takes lots of experience to command that type of asking price.

My basic point is between the asking price, the tooling not included, and the unknown skill level of the person doing that type of a restoration, I'm a bit sceptical.

Chauncey posted:

I did lol at the completely superfluous flaking on top of the compound though.

Yeah that is a bit ridiculous. He would have been better with a polished surface.

AbsentMindedWelder
Mar 26, 2003

It must be the fumes.

This weekend I cleaned up the aftermath of the lathe project in the garage, reorganized everything so I can move the Milling Machine parts around, disassembled the bench where the machine will sit, and assembled the gantry crane.

The block and tackle allowed me to assemble the crane by myself. The shop is an old carriage house so there is an attic and a hole in the middle of the ceiling where the hay used to get sent down to the horses. The block and tackle also allowed me to adjust the height pretty easily as well.

I purchased all new hardware for it. The old bolts had some threads missing and looked pretty ratty. The chain hoist works nice and smoothly.

Brekelefuw
Dec 16, 2003
I Like Trumpets

http://www.homemadetools.net/?utm_expid=57824293-7

You guys probably have seen this before, but drat its a good resource for neat ideas.

Brekelefuw
Dec 16, 2003
I Like Trumpets

Hey Ambrose, a while back you mentioned McKinnon metals.
Can you just drop by their store and get what you want, or do you have to order first and then pick up/ship it?

Ambrose Burnside
Aug 29, 2007

pensive


Brekelefuw posted:

Hey Ambrose, a while back you mentioned McKinnon metals.
Can you just drop by their store and get what you want, or do you have to order first and then pick up/ship it?

If they have it in stock on the racks you can just wrangle an employee to do the cuts you want and take it home immediately, but they don't keep a lot of weirder stuff I've tried to buy in stock (brass sheet, small-diameter tubing, that kind of thing) so usually I call ahead to see if they have it in before I trundle on down. Ordering stuff in doesn't cost you anything, tends to arrive in 2 or 3 days, and they don't seem to mind getting small cuts in, so it's not a huge deal.

I don't buy from em because theyre better than metals supermarket or nothin, it's mostly because they're close to home and directly on a bus line, but they haven't screwed around with me yet even though I'm making tiny purchases not worth their time compared to the contractors and builders buyin truckloads of pipe and angle iron.

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AbsentMindedWelder
Mar 26, 2003

It must be the fumes.

I was going to wait and post this until the "results are in" but I was bored and I thought it might be fun to start some speculation as to what the results might be.

Ever since the lathe has been put together I've been battling rust on all the handles and bare metal surfaces that don't get way oil or some type of lubrication. After a couple days light surface rust shows up. Marvel's Mystery Oil and Nevr-Dull have been working well at removing it, but I can see very quickly where this will be a constant PITA on a regular basis as I will not be using the machine every day. (Well, that remains to be seen, actually.)

Recently, while researching solvents and lubrication for my recently acquired M1 Garand, I quickly stumbled upon a recipe on the internet known as "Ed's Red." One of the ingredients that caught my eye was anhydrous lanolin. After more research, I found out that lanolin has been used as a rust preventative for a very long time by mariners and machinists. The thing that attracted me in particular to use of lanolin was that it is a natural product derived from sheep and an ingredient used in various skin creams and products. If it works, it should be particularly good for the lathe and my various hand tools.

I read somewhere (didn't bookmark) that 1 part lanolin can be mixed with 5 parts mineral spirits to be used as a rust preventer. The idea is the mineral spirits thins the solution, evaporates, and leaves behind a coating of lanolin on the metal.

I picked up the bulk anhydrous lanolin from Amazon. One of those plunger type measuring cups made easy work of measuring out 4 fl oz which I then put in a quart paint can.



In this terrible image you can see I used a double boiler type arrangement to melt the lanolin. I then took it outside and stirred in 20 fl oz of mineral spirits.



I found a white paper online that I did not have access to download that discusses use of lanolin as a rust preventer. I was able to read the introduction, however, and it stated that the minimum percentage by weight that is needed is 12.5%. Since I used a volume based measurement to mix my solution, I weighed the lanolin and mineral spirits and determined 1 part to 5 parts comes in around 22%.

I put a rag in a pint paint can and thoroughly soaked it with some of the solution. I wiped all the non-oiled lathe parts down with it. I also decided to run a test to see how well it works in comparison to other stuff.

I took an old saw blade, wire wheeled it, and gave it a coat of naval jelly to get all oxides off. Going from left to right: untreated metal, lanolin, oil film, WD-40. We'll see in a week or so how the test turns out.

While it's too soon to tell anything, I am already pleased with how the lanolin treated surfaces feels to the skin. It doesn't feel oily at all, and you can handle other objects without getting oil over them. Probably less chance of cancer too. :P




Brekelefuw posted:

http://www.homemadetools.net/?utm_expid=57824293-7

You guys probably have seen this before, but drat its a good resource for neat ideas.

I never saw that site, thanks for sharing!

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