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AnomalousBoners
Dec 22, 2007

by Ozma


Slung Blade posted:

Sounds like a cool machine man, I wish I had the money for tools like that.

I just have a cheapo chinese machine that does stick, TIG, and plasma cutting, 20-180 amps (DC only ) and can take 120 or 240v power in. It was a pretty good price for a hobby machine, about 650 bucks, and the duty cycle is actually quite good, 80% if I remember correctly.

Can I borrow yours someday? I'd like to use that 1 amp setting to weld some lead foil together just to say I've done it

I sold some of those, your machine should be either the CT416 or CT518 D model for duel voltage. The duty cycle is 60% but I thought it was a little over rated when I used a CUT series plasma cutter.

Right now I have the 200A AC/DC Tig called the WSME. I wish I had spent the extra money and got the plasma cutter although I haven't hooked this one up yet. I will soon enough though.

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Slung Blade
Jul 10, 2002

IN STEEL WE TRUST



CT416 sounds familiar, I'll look up the model number when I get home.

I've been pretty happy with it, it does a pretty good job buzzing away.

I have the argon tank and all the parts I need to TIG, I just have not done it yet.

Before I can try the plasma cutter out though, I need an air compressor. So many tools to get, so little space in the garage.

AnomalousBoners
Dec 22, 2007

by Ozma


I just got the plug for my 240V outlet a few minutes ago. I will be testing my AC/DC TIG tonight.

kapalama
Aug 15, 2007

EVERYTHING I SAY ABOUT JAPAN OR LIVING IN JAPAN IS COMPLETELY WRONG, BUT YOU BETTER BELIEVE I'LL ABOUT IT.

PLEASE ADD ME TO YOUR IGNORE LIST.

IF YOU SEE ME POST IN A JAPAN THREAD, PLEASE PM A MODERATOR SO THAT I CAN BE BANNED.


Has anyone ever heard of Duro welding holders?

Slung Blade
Jul 10, 2002

IN STEEL WE TRUST



kapalama posted:

Has anyone ever heard of Duro welding holders?

What do you mean by holder? Like a work clamp? A welding vise? Magnets? Something to put your electrodes into? Or the stinger?

(Short answer: No, sorry man)

AnomalousBoners
Dec 22, 2007

by Ozma


I cant tell you how loving excited I am. I am playing with a 200A AC/DC tig where the ENTIRE SETUP. Cost me less than $1000.

Machine: $750 or so (Got this a long time ago so I sorta forgot, that is close though)
Helmet: $50
Golve: $5
10 Pure 3/32 Tungstens: $20
80lb Bottle w/gas and Regulator: $112
Hose: $10
Two 240V wiring plugs: $30

Total: $977

God drat I love you China.



EDIT: I think I might pick up some stick electrodes from HF since this machine does that too.

mkultra419
May 3, 2005

Modern Day Alchemist

Pillbug

Awesome thread. Once I have a place with some workshop space (live in an apartment now) I really want to try my hand at homemade blacksmithing and casting. Also, I'm a materials engineer for a foundry that does investment casting for the aerospace and defense industries so I'd be happy to answer any basic casting questions anyone has or give any advice on mold design, stuff like that.

I'll also pimp dv6speed's backyard foundry thread, he's got a lot of good info for DIY metal casting:
http://forums.somethingawful.com/sh...hreadid=2904888

mkultra419 fucked around with this message at 23:31 on Jul 21, 2008

Slung Blade
Jul 10, 2002

IN STEEL WE TRUST



Whoa nice one, but how the gently caress did you get an argon bottle that cheap?

They're like 260 bucks for the little ones here.

AnomalousBoners
Dec 22, 2007

by Ozma


You can get them a lot cheaper than that on eBay. BUt I got very lucky and snagged this off of craigslist.

AbsentMindedWelder
Mar 26, 2003

It must be the fumes.

RealKyleH posted:

I am so awesome! Look... I'm TIG welding!
ME=JEALOUS

Good, now you can write up the TIG welding primer!

I can't wait to pick up a TIG torch at my welding school... I also can't wait to get/build a TIG machine.

I'm SO excited about starting welding school, I sent an email to my teacher asking if I can stop by and pick up a text book, plate, and electrodes to start stick practice with

AnomalousBoners
Dec 22, 2007

by Ozma


dv6speed posted:

ME=JEALOUS

Good, now you can write up the TIG welding primer!

I can't wait to pick up a TIG torch at my welding school... I also can't wait to get/build a TIG machine.

I'm SO excited about starting welding school, I sent an email to my teacher asking if I can stop by and pick up a text book, plate, and electrodes to start stick practice with

You can get that CT416D SO cheap for what it is on eBay. Runs off 110 and 220 (of course reduced amperage for 110) Sure you can't weld aluminum with it but its really cheap. They also have the Super machines on eBay that are AC/DC tig AND plasma cutter for like $1000 last time I checked. A smoking deal.

I will probably go to HF wed and try some stick welding.

AbsentMindedWelder
Mar 26, 2003

It must be the fumes.

RealKyleH posted:

I will probably go to HF wed and try some stick welding.
I will recommend to you some 6011 electrodes. They are for AC or DC electrode positive.

They are good for mild steel, have excellent penetration, very little slag, and are tolerant to paint and rust (tho of course, it works better on clean metal). They can also be used in all positions. You can find these electrodes almost anywhere. Even Home Depot has fairly good prices on them.

Arguably, this is one of the best all around electrodes for doing standard fab and repair work, especially for beginning stickers. Another benefit of them is that they are fairly tolerant to moisture. Some electrodes like 7018, are the opposite. Keep in mind they will have too much penetration for sheet metal. But that being said, for sheet metal you'll be wanting to use TIG anyway.

I'll see if I can drum some links up together and start a stick welding primer in a day or 2.

You should invest in a sealed electrode holder while you are at it.

Edit: Youtube videos are very useful for learning the basics of striking arcs and stick welding. They helped me out alot.

Edit2: Taking some pictures of your welds, and then posting them on some forums like this: http://www.hobartwelders.com/weldtalk is a great way to have true professional weldors critique your work.

AbsentMindedWelder fucked around with this message at 00:13 on Jul 22, 2008

AbsentMindedWelder
Mar 26, 2003

It must be the fumes.

How to solder... the REAL way (Or how to solder in the most manly and professional way possible)


Soldering is an easy, fantastic, excellent way to join both similar and dissimilar metals. You can not call yourself a metalworker without mastering this very basic technique.

Since there is already an electronics thread, I won't talk about soldering wires and electronic parts. I will instead focusing on things like pipe or larger metal objects that we will be dealing with.

Solder is defined as a fusible metal alloy that melts at temperates less then 800F, and is deposited to base metals via capillary action. If you don't know what capillary action is, I suggest heading over to wikipedia right now.

Done reading that fantastic article on capillary action? Good, now you should understand why soldered joints require fairly tightly fitting surfaces between base metals.

I'm going to talk about soldering copper, brass, iron, and steel. These are the most common metals you will be needing to solder.

Stainless steel, aluminum, and other metals can be soldered, but will require special fluxes and filler metal alloy. Also, in many cases brazing or braze welding may be better for some of the special metals and applications.

There are 2 typical solder alloys, 60/40 and 95/5. 60/40 is 60% lead and 40% tin. 95/5 is 95% tin and 5% antimony. 60/40 is good for all around and work and slightly easier to work with, but not safe for anything that will touch food or water. 95/5 melts at a slightly higher temp, but can be used on food and water items.

The flux you use depends on the base metal. Copper and brass can both use common rosin flux. This is the same flux you would find in the plumbing section of a Home Center. Steel will require an acid based flux. Be sure to check the bottle before purchase, it will list what it can be used for. If you have to solder copper or brass to steel, you will use the acid flux only.

You also need heat. You needs lots of heat, and this is where most people have a problem. Save the soldering iron for the electrical work. You are going to need torches. My personal favorite is the air-acetylene torch. Not only is Acetylene the most manly metalworking fuel gas, it provides the hottest flame. I do ALL my soldering with an air-acetylene torch, once you use it, you never go back. The next best thing is an air-MAPP torch, and thirdly is the air-propane torch.

I prefer torches that have a handle with a flexible hose. The torches that screw directly on a disposable cylinder limit you to the angles you can use the torch at because, of the you don't want to burn liquid issue.

Cleanliness is not next to godliness, IT IS GODLINESS
I can not stress this enough. Solder does not like dirt, grease, oil, any kind of bodily fluid, or foreign substance. Solvents are used for degreasing metal. Wire wheels, emery cloth, or sand paper are used to do a mechanical cleaning job of the metal.

That however, is not enough. You need something else to combat that, and the following issue: The other enemy to solder is oxidation. Whenever you heat metal, you oxidize the surface. Solder will not adhere to a dirt, oxidized surface.

If you guessed that's what the flux is for you are correct. Soldering flux, does 2 things, it cleans the metals more then you can through mechanical means, and PREVENTS surface oxidation so solder will adhere to it.

The flux burns off the longer you heat it. This is why it is important to get as hot of a torch as you can get. A good hot torch let's you heat your base metals fast, so the flux doesn't have time to burn off. Once the flux burns off, trying to solder the joint is as useful as pissing up in the wind.

The base metals must be evenly heated to above the solder melting temperature. The goal is to get the base metals to melt the alloy, NOT THE FLAME. It's such a simple concept, but one where so many people go wrong. Even professional plumbers don't know how to solder copper pipe right half the time.

Always keep the flame moving, never hold it one spot. Make sure the joint is EVENLY HEATED. Another trick to evenly heating metals is to keep in mind one part of a metal will heat the other. For example: Say you have to solder a small piece of copper to a larger piece of steel. The copper will get to alloy melting temps a lot faster then the steel. Your goal here would be to concentrate your heat on the steel, which will transfer heat to the copper. Every joint configuration is different, so decisions have to be made about your technique prior to starting.

Solder will follow the heat, and will only flow to the fluxed areas. While soldering, you will notice the solder likes to follow the torch flame. This illustrates why even heating is so important. Even heating needs to be there for good, proper CAPILLARY ACTION to take place. This knowledge of solder follows heat can also be useful if you need some help to evenly distribute a blob of solder.

After a successful procedure, be sure to let the part fully cool before moving the parts. Another important thing to do is to properly clean the part off all flux residue, ESPECIALLY an acid flux. The acid will eat at the metal if left on there. Another thing to keep in mind is that the acid cleans the metal so well, that it will start rusting very fast. So you'll want to put a thin coating of oil over the joint to prevent that, or paint the joint if appropriate.

Now you know how to solder like a professional. Go forth and practice, knowing you know more then the average plumber.

Edit: I forgot these very important statements:

NEVER, UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES USE FLUX CORE SOLDER FOR ANYTHING OTHER THEN TINY ELECTRICAL PARTS.

ELECTRICAL PARTS ALWAYS REQUIRE ROSIN CORE SOLDER.

NEVER, UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES BUY ACID FLUX CORE SOLDER. IT IS ENTIRELY USELESS.

IF YOU VIOLATE THE 3 ABOVE STATEMENTS IN CAPITAL LETTERS, DEMONS FROM HELL WILL surprise sex AND KILL YOU AND YOUR ENTIRE FAMILY.

Edit2: Use the knowledge of solder following the heat to help you solder pipe fittings that will hold pressure. Once the base metals are at alloy melting temp, bring your flame towards the rear of the joint, which will encourage the solder to flow through the entire joint.

By the rear of the joint, I mean the opposite of the opening where you would apply the solder.

AbsentMindedWelder fucked around with this message at 12:42 on Jul 23, 2008

AbsentMindedWelder
Mar 26, 2003

It must be the fumes.

Another very important soldering technique to know about is "tinning."

It's quite simple.

The 2 parts to be soldered together are first cleaned, fluxed, heated, and a thin layer of solder applied to their surface, BEFORE assembling them.

After the parts cool down, clean and reflux them, then put them together.

The joint is then reheated so base metals are at alloy melting temp, and the solder from the tinning operation will flow all together making the final joint.

Edit: In industry, often times parts are tinned by hand, then assembled, and put in ovens to heat the entire part to the proper temp to flow the solder.

Also, large parts will sometimes be put in ovens to preheat them and the finished joint will be heated to final temp by a torch and completed by hand. This type of heating operation is applicable to brazing too.

Edit2:
Flux application tip:

ALWAYS use a flux brush to apply flux. Never your fingers or anything else.

Flux brushes have rolled sheet metal handles and bristles about 5/8" long. These bristles are useless. Cut them with scissors so they are just over 1/4" long. It will be much more useful, and easier to apply a good coating of flux on your part.

AbsentMindedWelder fucked around with this message at 12:52 on Jul 22, 2008

AbsentMindedWelder
Mar 26, 2003

It must be the fumes.

I updated the 2nd post with all the metalcasting bullshit. I still have some more editing and additions to make.

update on my current furnace's refractory: i don't want to talk about that... gently caress clay... i'll make it work sooner or later

Edit: VVVVV

Slung Blade posted:

Thanks so much for all the input.
You're welcome. At least for some people, there are advantages to me not having a job!

AbsentMindedWelder fucked around with this message at 23:23 on Jul 22, 2008

Slung Blade
Jul 10, 2002

IN STEEL WE TRUST



That's awesome man, I added a few links to some of your other posts in this thread. Thanks so much for all the input.

Now if only if realKyleH would be so kind as to do a big write up on machining....

AnomalousBoners
Dec 22, 2007

by Ozma


Slung Blade posted:

That's awesome man, I added a few links to some of your other posts in this thread. Thanks so much for all the input.

Now if only if realKyleH would be so kind as to do a big write up on machining....

That'd be a very big write up and unfortunately I dont have any machines or I'd make some vids about how to run them.

AbsentMindedWelder
Mar 26, 2003

It must be the fumes.

So, you want to, or have to, learn to stick weld!

SMAW is awesome. To be a well versed weldor and metalworker, you should master, or at least be somewhat good at this process. I could sit here and re-invent the wheel and tell you how to arc weld, or I could post a shitload of links. I'm opting for the latter.

Do not forget youtube videos. Just start searching, there are lots of usefull ones.

Also the main manufacturer's such as Lincoln, Miller, and Hobart all have great websites with loads of information that I haven't linked to here. The Hobart forums are a pretty friendly place: http://www.hobartwelders.com/weldtalk/

BEFORE YOU STRIKE AN ARC, YOU HAVE TO KNOW ABOUT THIS: Welding machine duty cycle

For those of you who are new to welding you might have no idea what the duty cycle of a welding machine is. A duty cycle is expressed in % terms of a 10 minute period.

For example, a 20% duty cycle machine can operate for 2 minutes straight out of a 10 minute period. The other 8 minutes the machines must rest, turned on, so the fans can cool her down.

Long story short: Buy a stick welder, preferably AC/DC, but you can work with AC only. Buy some 6011 electrodes, get some steel, read the guides down below. For 6011, configure your machine for AC or DC electrode positive.

1. Start by learning how to strike and maintain an arc. You tube videos are particularly useful for this.
2. Learn how to lay a bead.
3. Practice laying beads by building up the thickness of a plate.
4. Make different kinds of joints
5. Make different kinds of joints in different positions.
6. Practice and continue to read more about welding
7. Repeat step 6 for the next 30 years.


Everything you wanted to know about Arc Welding saftey:
http://content.lincolnelectric.com/...rature/e205.pdf
http://www.millerwelds.com/pdf/safe..._eng_200704.pdf
http://www.millerwelds.com/educatio...article105.html

How to stick weld:
http://www.millerwelds.com/pdf/guidelines_smaw.pdf
http://www.aussieweld.com.au/arcwelding/
http://content.lincolnelectric.com/...ature/c2410.pdf

Electrode Selection:
http://www.thefabricator.com/ArcWel...cle.cfm?ID=1674
http://content.lincolnelectric.com/...rature/c210.pdf
http://content.lincolnelectric.com/...rature/c610.pdf
http://www.esabna.com/EUWeb/FM_handbook/577fm1_1.htm

More really good info on both SMAW and electrodes:
http://www.clovisusd.k12.ca.us/agcenter/arc_welding.htm
http://www.esabna.com/EUWeb/AWTC/Lesson1_1.htm
http://www.esabna.com/us/en/educati...-university.cfm

Welding Manufactures
Lincoln: http://www.lincolnelectric.com/
Hobart: http://www.hobartwelders.com/
Miller: http://www.millerwelds.com/

If I find any other links worthy of this fine list, or anyone else does, I will be happy to edit them in here.

Tip on selecting current settings on your stick welder

You will see current electrodes charts, and you'll find they give a lot of leeway. This is complicated by the fact your welding machine is different then other welding machines. You will have to experiment with your machine to find out what works best with what. If you read the above links, you will have plenty of into to look at your beads and figure out how your current setting has to be changed.

Good luck arcin' and sparkin'!

AbsentMindedWelder fucked around with this message at 03:21 on Jul 23, 2008

AbsentMindedWelder
Mar 26, 2003

It must be the fumes.

RealKyleH posted:

That'd be a very big write up and unfortunately I dont have any machines or I'd make some vids about how to run them.
How about some very basics to familiarize people with the process, and links to websites with good info for how to get more in-depth?

SmokeyXIII
Apr 19, 2008
Not Stephen Harper in Disguise.

That is simply not true.


From personal experience Miller is the best manufacturer of Welding machines. They have the smoothest arc and excellent reliability. Lincoln are also a good choice, quite similar to miller but have a little bit of a jumpier arc. You probably wouldn't even notice the difference unless you are an experienced welder.

If you're going to get a welder to learn to weld professionally on, you will want a DC welder without a doubt. Only once in my professional career have I used AC current while welding. It was on a 32' Diameter vessel with 2.5" wall thickness and made from Chromoly with an Inconel overlay with a total weight of about 450 tonnes. Basically not beginner stuff.

For a beginner I would suggest starting with 7028 electrodes, they basically weld themselves. Very easy to restart your arc if you snub out (they call it stick welding for a reason! You will get that joke later if you've never tried welding before). 7018 is about the most common electrode used for welding plain carbon steels, which is the most common type of steel and is used to make all kinds of things from. 6010/6011 both have similar welding characteristics and it depends on the region you live in and the applicable codes in said region as to which one you use. Where I'm from we use 6010, it's another common rod and great for a challenge if you're trying to restrike a rod after you've burned it once.

As for amperage for your rods, if you are burning a 3/32" diameter 7018 you will want to run about 90 amps. 1/8" 7018 will run about 120-125. 1/8" 6010 you'll probably burn about 80-90 amps. 7028 rods will burn slightly hotter than the 7018 because of the heavy flux coating on the rod.

dv6speed, are you a professional welder? You seem to know whats going on with the trade.

SmokeyXIII fucked around with this message at 03:03 on Jul 23, 2008

AbsentMindedWelder
Mar 26, 2003

It must be the fumes.

SmokeyXIII posted:

dv6speed, are you a professional welder? You seem to know whats going on with the trade.
I'm working on becoming one. I start welding school full time Aug 25th. I've been reading about welding since I was a kid. I've been stick welding personally, for about 2 months. All I have is a Lincoln AC-225-S, but my oxy-acetylene rig fills in the gaps nicely.

As mentioned previously, since I'm mostly interested in stick/TIG I'm looking at skipping all the bullshit and just getting the Miller Dynasty 200DX.

AbsentMindedWelder fucked around with this message at 12:49 on Jul 23, 2008

SmokeyXIII
Apr 19, 2008
Not Stephen Harper in Disguise.

That is simply not true.


dv6speed posted:

I'm working on becoming one. I start welding school full time Aug 25th. I've been reading about welding since I was a kid. I've been stick welding personally, for about 2 months. All I have is a Lincoln AC-225-S, but my oxy-acetylene rig fills in the gaps nicely.

As mentioned previously, since I'm mostly interested in stick/TIG I'm looking at skipping all the bullshit and just getting the Miller Dynasty 200DX.

Where do you live? What kind of schooling is it? How long? What does it teach? Do you have any kind of apprenticeship program where you are? What kind of industry to you want to get into?

AbsentMindedWelder
Mar 26, 2003

It must be the fumes.

I live in Delaware. It is free school provided by the state, 12 weeks, 420 hours. They focus on stick and MIG, oxy-fuel cutting, and some TIG. The faster you learn, the more you learn in that time. They do help with job placement.

Not quite sure yet how the apprenticeship program works, if there is one, still need to look into that. The instructor did note, that the more skills you have after you leave his class will directly impact your pay scale.

I believe I am mostly interested in pipe welding by day, and specialty welding on the side and as a hobby. Thus why I'm mostly interested in stick/TIG.

There are lots of chemical plants and refineries near me.

Edit: I may eventually find may into custom automotive fabrication. However, I want to spend some time in industry building the things that makes this fine country of ours tick.

AbsentMindedWelder fucked around with this message at 03:40 on Jul 23, 2008

SmokeyXIII
Apr 19, 2008
Not Stephen Harper in Disguise.

That is simply not true.


dv6speed posted:

I live in Delaware. It is free school provided by the state, 12 weeks, 420 hours. They focus on stick and MIG, oxy-fuel cutting, and some TIG. The faster you learn, the more you learn in that time. They do help with job placement.

Not quite sure yet how the apprenticeship program works, if there is one, still need to look into that. The instructor did note, that the more skills you have after you leave his class will directly impact your pay scale.

I believe I am mostly interested in pipe welding by day, and specialty welding on the side and as a hobby. Thus why I'm mostly interested in stick/TIG.

There are lots of chemical plants and refineries near me.

Edit: I may eventually find may into automotive fabrication. However, I want to spend some time in industry building the things that makes this fine country of ours tick.

Pipe welding is an excellent goal. Just keep in mind that in order to succeed practice practice practice! It sounds like that course is going to give you a great introduction into the trade. Cutting and wire feed processes are probably going to help you most as a starter into the trade. As a beginner expect to be doing a lot of grinding while you gain more and more experience. It's a tough game to get into, but once you're at the top it is sweet! I made an ask/tell thread about working in Alberta's Oil Sands here if you're interested in what it can be like working in the industry.

Slung Blade
Jul 10, 2002

IN STEEL WE TRUST



SmokeyXIII posted:

Pipe welding is an excellent goal. Just keep in mind that in order to succeed practice practice practice! It sounds like that course is going to give you a great introduction into the trade. Cutting and wire feed processes are probably going to help you most as a starter into the trade. As a beginner expect to be doing a lot of grinding while you gain more and more experience. It's a tough game to get into, but once you're at the top it is sweet! I made an ask/tell thread about working in Alberta's Oil Sands here if you're interested in what it can be like working in the industry.

Hello fellow Albertan, how are things up the biggest town in Newfoundland?

That's a pretty interesting looking job you have there, do you have any pictures of things you've fabricated? I know it's tough to share what with the camera restrictions and all, but I'm fascinated.

SmokeyXIII
Apr 19, 2008
Not Stephen Harper in Disguise.

That is simply not true.


http://i35.tinypic.com/ae2w7l.jpg

This is that 32' diameter vessel I was talking about. As you can see, compared to the people it is VERY big. That is 2 10' sections welded together. In total there is 11 or 12 sections, plus the heads. Behind it you can see the 'head' of the vessel. Its just a half circle that goes on either end.

http://i37.tinypic.com/2d2jddi.jpg
http://i34.tinypic.com/vesx6u.jpg

There is a couple shots of the drilling rigs I was building back when I was a first year. I don't really have much more information for you than "It's a drilling rig" what with being a first year and all.

SmokeyXIII fucked around with this message at 00:47 on Jul 24, 2008

AbsentMindedWelder
Mar 26, 2003

It must be the fumes.

I spoke to a rep at a refractory company that I can do local pickup at their Philly office with. I also have an email and phone number of the Delaware sales rep so I may even get free delivery!

The rep just sent me an email telling me the 3 items they keep in stock locally, 2 non-insulating, and 1 insulating. The min order is 1 55lb bag.

https://www.hwr.com

Insulating castable:
KAST-O-LITE 30 LI PLUS IN 55 LB SACKS (3000 F) @ $0.72/lb: Click here for data sheet

Dense, non-insulating castable:
VERSAFLOW 60 PLUS IN 55 LB SACKS (3100 F) @ $0.58/lb: Click here for data sheet

This is another dense, non-insulating castable they stock but seems a little high price for what I need:
GREENCAST-94 PLUS IN 55 LB SACKS (3400 F) @ $1.66/lb: Click here for data sheet

I think the KAST-O-LITE 30 and the VERSAFLOW 60 PLUS will work perfectly for any furnace I want to build, for any metal including cast iron, at a fairly reasonable price.

This is good news because I've been having severe problems with the homemade clay/foam refractory.

Edit: Castable refractory is called just "castable" by us metalheads.

Edit2: I found this company by looking up "refractory" in the yellow pages.

Edit3: I did some googling: Click here to buy a Miller Dynasty 200DX for $2800 and free shipping

AbsentMindedWelder fucked around with this message at 01:42 on Jul 24, 2008

Slung Blade
Jul 10, 2002

IN STEEL WE TRUST



I think that's the same castable cement I used to line my forge with dv6, I just mixed it in an ice cream bucket, it's pretty easy to mess around with.



Smokey, thanks for sharing man, nice pictures. For the drilling rig, were the gantries (poo poo, I can't remember if that's the right name, the main structure) made by NOI / Varco?

I used to work for NOI a few years ago in Calgary. Just as a warehouse bitch, but it was an ok job.

SmokeyXIII
Apr 19, 2008
Not Stephen Harper in Disguise.

That is simply not true.


Yep! Thats exactly where I was working. National Oilwell Varco.

Slung Blade
Jul 10, 2002

IN STEEL WE TRUST



Holy poo poo that's a coincidence. I was just in the Calgary distribution warehouse, we didn't build anything, we just sold fittings, parts, pipe, and valves to local fab shops and a couple of refineries around town.

I would have stayed, but we got a new manager about 4 years ago and the guy was a total douche.


Man I wish I was into doing metal work back then, I could have kept so many awesome high quality steel parts instead of selling them to the scrapyard. (loving people ordering odd pieces and then returning them )

AnomalousBoners
Dec 22, 2007

by Ozma


You can get castable refractory at Ace Hardware they just have to order it for you as they rarely stock it.

AbsentMindedWelder
Mar 26, 2003

It must be the fumes.

Slung Blade posted:

I think that's the same castable cement I used to line my forge with dv6, I just mixed it in an ice cream bucket, it's pretty easy to mess around with.
Are you speaking of the VERSAFLOW 60? Did you use anything like kaowool in it for insulation? Edit: If you are using versaflow 60, how does it hold up to the fluxes for forge welding?

RealKyleH posted:

You can get castable refractory at Ace Hardware they just have to order it for you as they rarely stock it.
I have a hunch the price would be a little high through them, but that being said, I'd still want to see a data sheet for it before I buy it.

Edit: FYI there is a difference between furnace cement and castable. Castable is what you want to use to make the actual refractory. Furnace cement is basically a high temp glue used to put together firebrick, or make repairs in castable.

AbsentMindedWelder fucked around with this message at 13:48 on Jul 24, 2008

Slung Blade
Jul 10, 2002

IN STEEL WE TRUST



dv6speed posted:

Are you speaking of the VERSAFLOW 60? Did you use anything like kaowool in it for insulation? Edit: If you are using versaflow 60, how does it hold up to the fluxes for forge welding?


I'm not sure of the exact brand name, sorry. I can look it up when I get home tonight.

I didn't use anything for additional insulation, it just forms the bottom of my forge and keeps the pipe I used as a tuyere from melting. I've not done any forge welding yet, I have not needed to, for the rare time I need to weld something, I just use the arc welder. I'm sorry man, I wish I had more information to share.

AbsentMindedWelder
Mar 26, 2003

It must be the fumes.

I'm concerned about the fluxes from forge welding because I am interested in making damascus knives. I will ask the manufacturer about that, they should know.

Anybody found any good, really cheap... err inexpensive sources for kaowool or other types of ceramic blanket/insulating material?

Slung Blade
Jul 10, 2002

IN STEEL WE TRUST



I think the only refractory material you have to worry about wearing out is the kaowool ceramic blanket and to some extent the fireboard / brick. The wool apparently melts like cotton candy in water when it gets flux on it.

From what I've read, most/all refractory cements are pretty resilient to that sort of thing.

AbsentMindedWelder
Mar 26, 2003

It must be the fumes.

Crucible Furnace Operation TIP:

Don't get too close to the furnace...

I just found some singed beard hair after looking in the mirror. One would think I would have felt that much heat!

Slung Blade
Jul 10, 2002

IN STEEL WE TRUST



It's pretty easy to lose all the hair on your forearms too.


I was smithing tonight (didn't finish, I will post images tomorrow, weather permitting) and I had a bunch of charcoal dust left in the bag. Now, I know this makes sparks, but I say to myself "hey, I like flying sparks" and dump it anyway.

Yeah, basically I had a shower of sparks spewing 10 feet out of the forge for about 20 minutes, landing as ash all over my tools. That kinda sucked, but at least the visuals were cool

AnomalousBoners
Dec 22, 2007

by Ozma


Tried stick welding for the first time tonight and hopefully last time ever. My piece was so much prettier before. I will stick to TIG/shielded mig TYVM. Only way to go in my book.

AbsentMindedWelder
Mar 26, 2003

It must be the fumes.

RealKyleH posted:

Tried stick welding for the first time tonight and hopefully last time ever.
Pictures?

Practice! SMAW arc welding is something usefull you should know how to do. Never know when you have to go your buddies house and use his AC only stick welder to make a quick repair to something.

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AnomalousBoners
Dec 22, 2007

by Ozma


dv6speed posted:

Pictures?

Practice! SMAW arc welding is something usefull you should know how to do. Never know when you have to go your buddies house and use his AC only stick welder to make a quick repair to something.

Nothing worth taking pictures of yet. Once the day gets going I will try to cut up some aluminum wheels and practice and take pictures. I hear cast aluminum sucks to weld but so far I haven't had that experience. I really need a blast cabinet I am finding out though. Also, I don't have friends that have tools.

AnomalousBoners fucked around with this message at 11:12 on Jul 25, 2008

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