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Sagebrush
Feb 26, 2012





Gravy Boat 2k



thinkin bout thos spicy chips

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Rapulum_Dei
Sep 7, 2009


That is a thing of beauty friend, you should be proud of what youíve done there.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...

Fallen Rib

Rapulum_Dei posted:

That is a thing of beauty friend, you should be proud of what you’ve done there.

Seriously. Herr Deckel would be proud.

Free Market Mambo
Jul 26, 2010

by Lowtax


Awesome work.

If you're still looking for a big old Kemppi mig welder, I've been seeing a few show up on Kiertonet lately.

His Divine Shadow
Aug 7, 2000

I'm not a fascist. I'm a priest. Fascists dress up in black and tell people what to do.


Thanks

Still looking yeah, last night someone tried to scam me as well. Someone put up a Kempomat 250 for a good price, but when i wanted to go see it he was all No I am in Kuopio now, you send me money I come with machine to you this weekend. Smelled fishy and I declined.

By coincidence another person I sorta know had asked on the same ad knowing it was fake, because he recognized the image was stolen and haggled with him until he asked why the image was stolen from another place and he hung up on him at once. So he got the ad deleted and posted about it on a local forum.

Later last night the wanna scammer sent me an SMS "350Ä ??!?!?". Poor guy must be desperate.

Still looking though. I was talking to one guy near Jakobstad but he stopped answering my questions. It's like it's too much to ask about the gas cylinder, when it was inspected (since he owns it, that's rare, a real owned bottle, not a swappable one). Downside to those is 300e inspection every decade and you can't just swap the bottle for a new one but gotta leave it to get filled.

Professor Shark
May 22, 2012



Bleak Gremlin

So that buckle came in, and it did not react with a magnet. It appears that it has some sort of strange film on it that I cannot rub off, even using water and baking soda, and I think might be the cause of the brown spots:







Ideas on how I can make this thing shine?

armorer
Aug 6, 2012

I like metal.

Maybe someone previously sprayed it with some sort of clear coat enamel, and that is chipping off?

Professor Shark
May 22, 2012



Bleak Gremlin

That's what my first thought was.

Rapulum_Dei
Sep 7, 2009


His Divine Shadow posted:

It's like it's too much to ask about the gas cylinder, when it was inspected (since he owns it, that's rare, a real owned bottle, not a swappable one). Downside to those is 300e inspection every decade and you can't just swap the bottle for a new one but gotta leave it to get filled.

I donít know that Iíd be bothered with that- just get a refillable one. It took me so long to go though my bottle of gas that when I went to get it refilled the company had gone bust/been taken over and they had to give me some money back because the new companyís deposit for cylinders was less. So 1/2 price refill

Shows how much welding I do. On the other hand I _have_ gone through a lot of grinding disks in the same interval.

Speaking of; My shed was broken into and all my power tools and tool bag taken. Which is a bit poo poo. BUT I do have insurance so Iíve sent them a list of what was lost. They said on account of the current situation (REMAIN INDOORS) they were settling most claims with cash. I was using Bosch 18V and found them all fine (except the grinder which was disappointing). The 2 in 1 impact driver/wrench is particularly missed.

Should I stick with Bosch or is there better for the money?


(Lights blue touch paper and stands back...)

M_Gargantua
Oct 16, 2006

STOMPIN' ON INTO THE POWER LINES

Exciting Lemon

I've developed a softspot for the new dewalt flexvolt devices. But there are also a lot of local companies and engineers that support their supply chain so i'm biased.

e; specifically i've spent way to much time with the flexvolt angle grinder and still love the thing. Probably went through 12 cutoff disks and 4 flap wheels this season

M_Gargantua fucked around with this message at 05:02 on Mar 28, 2020

His Divine Shadow
Aug 7, 2000

I'm not a fascist. I'm a priest. Fascists dress up in black and tell people what to do.


Rapulum_Dei posted:

I donít know that Iíd be bothered with that- just get a refillable one. It took me so long to go though my bottle of gas that when I went to get it refilled the company had gone bust/been taken over and they had to give me some money back because the new companyís deposit for cylinders was less. So 1/2 price refill

I honestly didn't know it was possible to have a refillable bottle anymore when I saw it, my mind went towards the stories of people buying stolen or ancient bottles no longer supported they couldn't refill anymore.

The history of weldling gas in Finland is a bit convoluted. Back in the days in the 1970s or so people who owned their own bottles was the norm. We had only one gas company, AGA and around then they decided they could make a lot more money if they banned owned bottles and made everything rentable. So it was until the 2000s or so, I think private individuals could get 5 liter bottles (maybe 40cf) during the AGA monopoly days, anything bigger and you had to rent. Around that time other companies started up (Woikoski) or came in from abroad (Air Liquide) and started challenging AGAs monopoly situation.

Air Liquide seemed to set the standard with their swappable bottle model and allowing private individuals to get their hands on 10/11 liter bottles (@200 bar, so a little less than an 80CF bottle). You buy the gas bottle for an initial price(300-350Ä), but nobody will refill it for you, instead you take it to the nearest dealer and swap it in for a fresh one (80-90Ä), in Air Liquides case this also means you get a serviced regulator every time as they are integrated. This is what most companies offer now 5/10 liter swap in bottles. But apparently Woikoski offers refillable 20 liter bottles now, they are the only ones I know doing this. I like the swappable bottle system though, it's quick and fast and never any inspections.


Man that sucks about the break in. I'm worried about that myself, though it's a very low crime area this and I got insurance. I'm definitely a Makita guy by now myself. When it comes to battery tools. Don't own many though.

Rapulum_Dei
Sep 7, 2009


Here is the same as things like butane cylinders, deposit initially then swap full for empty each time.

Yeah Iím pretty gutted, thereís probably stuff I donít even realise is gone yet till I go looking for it.
The insurance has been less than stellar - they appointed a Ďspecialistí company that deals in tools aledgedly.
each time they email, I reply within an hour and then they reply a day later. ..

1; please send us a list of whatís been taken and the value
2; do you have model numbers for <random items from list>
3; do you have prices for those items
4; GOTO 2

Including - and this was the one that broke me ďdo you have details of the battery charger?Ē I mean seriously, I felt like replying Ďjust google ití.
At the end of the day whatever they give me to replace everything is just going to be added to next years renewal price anyway.

Know how bad things are; the only drill Iíve got left is a 14.4v IKEA one. The shame

Rapulum_Dei fucked around with this message at 12:31 on Mar 28, 2020

His Divine Shadow
Aug 7, 2000

I'm not a fascist. I'm a priest. Fascists dress up in black and tell people what to do.


​I decided to test the runout of the inside of the ER-32 holder I have and it was a whole tenth of a mm! I tried to chuck it in the horizontal spindle and the runout was .02mm or .001", which is more acceptable I guess.

Tested both spindles directly against the taper (done that before too) and they both check out within spec, total runout of 4-5 microns. I'm guessing there's something inside the taper on the vertical head. I took a good look and found galling damage at the very edge of the bottom of the taper, with a raised burr. I took a small diamond file and arkansas slip stone and marked out the area with a sharpie so I could see where I was working. Some careful work and I'm back to .01mm runout which I guess is acceptable, half a thou in inches.



I think the quality of the cut improved a lot when I got the burr removed from the taper:


That's the result of several cuts, I mean I think maybe the mill can take a cut like that, if I went slow and used cooling. But I machined this dry. I know it would most definitly take it with the horizontal setup.

Ambrose Burnside
Aug 29, 2007

pensive


i've been working on an electronics project that really does perfectly straddle electronicthread and metalthread and i really should have been crossposting it here from the beginning. i'm experimenting with fabricating my own version a quack electrotherapy device from the mid-1800s called a pulvermacher chain, read up on it here- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pulvermacher%27s_chain chemically it's just a classic voltaic battery pile, a battery of power-producing cells made from dissimilar metals physically-separated but electrically-connected with an electrolytic fluid. what's neat about the chain is its unique form-factor and modular design- it's a length of metal chain that generates electricity, but you can also add or remove links as needed to alter the voltage/current produced. this made it more popular as an early power source for experimenters than as a medical device. here's the original design, which used two electrode wires wrapped around wooden spacer dowels for each cell:



the design was improved over time, the later models made use of tubing and sheet metal stampings, like this example:



anyways: the OG pulvermacher chain used zinc and copper electrodes, which had the downside of needing to be soaked in an acidic electrolyte like vinegar. if you substitute magnesium for the zinc, though, you get two huge improvements:
1) the voltage produced per cell is nearly doubled, reducing the number of links needed for a given power supply; but more importantly
2) many electrolytes will activate the battery, including plain water or salt water. plain ol' sweat will work just fine.

back in the 1800s magnesium was an absurdly expensive metal, so this configuration was apparently not really used in commercial models despite the benefits. in the year 2020, magnesium is cheap, even easily-available in certain 'profiles' like ignition ribbon used to light thermite. I even have an unopened roll on hand. see where this is going?


finding myself extremely bored in social isolation, I have taken it upon myself to produce a modern magnesium-copper pulvermacher chain-based power source, which will generate useful electricity simply by being worn by a living, sweating human being. i'm treating it as an experiment/art project for the time being, but I want to actually make something practical- so i'm simultaneously designing a (more conventionally-produced) power regulator and battery charger circuit that will turn the fluctuating, very low-amp power from the chain into regulated, steady DC power, likely at 3.3/5V to enable USB device charging. I'm pretty sure I can even continually power small digital devices with this chain if they're designed for low power draw; I hope to come up with some sort of Arduino microcontroller-level device that's suited to the very specific advantages (And disadvantages) of this very weird, idk what to call it, experimental art battery

gonna quote-bomb my previous relevant content from electrothread to here, via decadent double-posting vvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvv

Ambrose Burnside
Aug 29, 2007

pensive


Ambrose Burnside posted:

guess who hosed around and made a magnesium-copper pulvermacher chain battery




Ambrose Burnside posted:


UNLIMITED POWER


added a fourth cell, which is an iteration of the third, which etc. im closing in on how to form the electrodes and do the wrapping effectively, i've also started using wax to mask out certain electrode parts that tend to short against other cells in unwanted ways but i'll switch to sth more permanent soon. the biggest limiting factor irt the actual cell-link design is working with the magnesium ribbon, which is very brittle and can only take very large bend radii without cracking. the twine is there as the separator + electrolyte sponge but it's also extremely useful for totally constraining as much of the magnesium electrode as possible, because more than a single bend attempt at one spot will instantly create fatigue crack failures. magnesium is such a piece of poo poo. anyways, a few progress pix from link mk4


the copper and magnesium electrodes. the closed loop ends are the bails where the chains link to each other, while the 'rams-horn' scrolled terminals at the other end provide anchors/fastening points for the sheathing cord. wish I could make the magnesium ones smaller but they just crack so it is what it is


here's what the copper electrode looks like after the first sheath wrapping. but before the magnesium electrode + sheathing is added over top. the scrolled terminals have two 'divisions' each so that i can tie off the second layer of magnesium sheathing with the same terminals. I only use the magnesium scrolled ends to help constrain the electrode location wrt the copper one to prevent shorts b/c you don't want any real mechanical load on those terms.
in any case, the design guarantees that the tauter the chain is pulled the power supplied is stronger and steadier,


Ambrose Burnside posted:

[responding to previous speculation about attempting to pre-load the cell terminal connections to produce a steadier power supply]

nothin groundbreaking so far, but it's fun experimenting w different approaches. turns out making springs with hammer + anvil and literal garbage from behind the workshop bench is not the pareto-optimal way to approach this. copper isn't a great spring material so i have to work-harden the poo poo out of it to get useful elastic deformation instead of just plastic deformation.
for most of these i'm starting w round wire and then hammering it into a flat rectangular profile and rolling that up like a clock mainspring, the idea being to max out the potential contact area w the similarly-profiled magnesium ribbon; my other thought is to use plain round wire springs but use them in pairs inside each Mg terminal loop


i suspect it'll be easiest to design the terminal-preloading component as its own double-ended coupling linkage used to join all cells to one another. I need a semipermanent way to connect cells while letting me modify the battery down the road, right now the outer sheathing prevents opening up the cell terminal loops post-assembly so i can't "mix and match" cells without having to repair em afterwards.
also wish I had some bronze wire, it's what they use for leaf spring-type battery contacts b/c it's got the mechanical properties you want plus decently-low resistance. nickel silver too, esp b/c its oxide is still highly-conductive. for all i know that'd screw with the galvanic chemistry at work here, tho

shame on an IGA
Apr 8, 2005



Ambrose posted:

Magnesium breaks when cold worked

Have you tried putting a torch on it?

Yooper
Apr 30, 2012



Grimey Drawer

shame on an IGA posted:

Have you tried putting a torch on it?

That's an incredibly bright idea.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...

Fallen Rib

Yooper posted:

That's an incredibly bright idea.

Blindingly obvious

LegoMan
Mar 17, 2002

ting ting ting


College Slice

Where should I look (portland or area if anyone knows specifics) for steel tubing/pipe/used fire extinguisher tanks basically anything I can mess around with to make simple steel crucibles? I'm working on my own electric furnace and i watched some videos on steel crucibles (graphite seem to not last long). I'd like to make my own and also practice welding.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

I don't know about your area in particular, but my local scrap metal recycling place has been pretty helpful with that kind of thing.

Ambrose Burnside
Aug 29, 2007

pensive


LegoMan posted:

Where should I look (portland or area if anyone knows specifics) for steel tubing/pipe/used fire extinguisher tanks basically anything I can mess around with to make simple steel crucibles? I'm working on my own electric furnace and i watched some videos on steel crucibles (graphite seem to not last long). I'd like to make my own and also practice welding.

What metal are you looking to cast? How large a charge do you want to be able to melt? Steel crucibles are a good place to start for many applications, particularly non-structural aluminium casting; as youíve intuited theyíre relatively accessible/DIY-friendly, and are indeed more durable than graphite or refractory-based crucibles in some ways. The critical caveats are

1) steel crucibles are, at first, very mechanically-robust and basically immune to crucible-destroying thermal shock/droppage Incidents. The catch is that steel oxidizes aggressively in the heat of a furnace thatís open to the atmosphere as yours likely will be (vs vacuum smelters or those filled w a shielding gas). with repeated uses the walls and base of a steel crucible will thin continually, until one fateful smelt when the bottom falls out from the weight of the charge, or the gripping force of the tongs makes it crumble. all crucibles are consumable components, but steel crucibles generally degrade exponentially faster even assuming proper use/handling.

2) Steelís mechanical properties decline precipitously while at elevated temps. This is the principle blacksmithing exploits. It also means a steel crucible will become putty-soft and structurally-unsuitable at the casting temps of most metals. Aluminium, lead and pewter melt low enough for this to not be an issue, as well as zinc, quality zinc casting alloys like Zamak, and even zincís wretched children, ďassorted pot-metalsĒ.

3) this is the most serious issue for people who stick with metal casting past experimenting: steel crucibles contaminate most any metal melted in them with iron. they effectively create uncontrolled alloys with mystery metal proportions out of anything melted in them, which is conceptually neat but extremely undesirable. this isnít an issue if youíre making small decorative castings, but is absolutely unacceptable if youíre casting structural or mechanically-critical aluminium parts where an unexpected and premature failure could represent a safety issue to yourself or especially others.


assuming a small-medium size aluminium smelter: a welded steel crucible is probably a good place to start, particularly if fabricating it yourself isnít an obstacle. If you want to cast precious metals or cuprous alloys, steel wonít cut it. and if you want to cast REALLY low-melting stuff like pewter/lead, a melting pot + bottom-pouring ladle is the way to go.

Ambrose Burnside fucked around with this message at 16:17 on Apr 9, 2020

LegoMan
Mar 17, 2002

ting ting ting


College Slice

I'm just melting down scrap aluminum for small casting projects. I want to melt copper but I know I need better crucible material for that. My graphite one did well for that before the heating element burnt in half (cheap poo poo) and I decided to make my own furnace using the guts from the one I bought off amazon.

shovelbum
Oct 21, 2010



Fallen Rib

Metal dudes do any metals other than copper and silver kill germs on their surface quickly, and do they have to be like polished to work?

LegoMan
Mar 17, 2002

ting ting ting


College Slice

http://imgur.com/a/swWuh5l

It's not pretty to look at but once the materials arrive I'll be using the smaller firebricks as a removable insert so heating elements can be replaced easily. The grinding disk is a 4 inch reference so I know how much space I have. I am going to refractory the poo poo out of it and theres a graphite plate on the bottom.

The last picture is one I posted earlier and is basically old iron wood burning stove that I hollowed out for this project

Rapulum_Dei
Sep 7, 2009


Ambrose Burnside posted:

The oligodynamic effect is hella cool and it's criminal that it's almost unknown outside of academic circles b/c, yeah, using self-sterilizing metals for high-contact surfaces is an incredibly effective passive hygiene measure that was once universal in hospitals for their hardware/fixtures before other antibacterial products were opted for for cost-cutting reasons.
It's not just copper, brasses/nickel silvers/all cuprous alloys exhibit the effect proportional to their copper content, plus all other noble/heavy metals like lead, gold, silver, etc. silver is actually much more aggressive in its antimicrobial action than copper across the board and begins self-cleaning almost instantaneously + totally sterilizes itself significantly faster than copper does, but silver isnt' FDA approved for this purpose (the colloidal silver cranks ruined this for everyone) so it isn't being tested w covid-19. lighter/less noble metals, your steels and aluminums and nickels and so on, do not exhibit this effect and act like other non-porous surfaces irt microbe tenacity.

I'm actually modifying my little rapid-tooling urethane metal embossing pet project i've been plugging away at to address this, by showing that the method can rapidly produce custom-tailored antimicrobial copper faceplates/cases/housings for critical transmission vectors like light switches, cellphones, elevator buttons etc. i was looking for a tasty user application and this is the best one i could ask for, i think

In answer to shovelbumís question above, not just empty quoting.

Rapulum_Dei fucked around with this message at 06:48 on Apr 10, 2020

shovelbum
Oct 21, 2010



Fallen Rib

Nice I put in a lead bench top at work before the pandemic got big I hope the guy who relieved me appreciates it

His Divine Shadow
Aug 7, 2000

I'm not a fascist. I'm a priest. Fascists dress up in black and tell people what to do.


I made a custom coupling for the FP2. The drain hole for the vertical table (moves the X-axis) for cutting fluid is in a very tight spot once the table moves to the extreme right of it's travel, it only has a little clearance between the saddle and table then.
The elbow coupling I bought did not fit so I made my own with an integral hose barb, that allowed me to get size down. I had brass to make this from, but brass is expensive and I was afraid of screwing up. Aluminum seemed to work.





cakesmith handyman
Jul 22, 2007

Pip-Pip old chap! Last one in is a rotten egg what what.



That's really good looking, how did you hold it to turn the thread? 4-jaw with 1 jaw way out? What order of operations did you use? (I know nothing about machining as you can tell)

Yooper
Apr 30, 2012



Grimey Drawer

shovelbum posted:

Metal dudes do any metals other than copper and silver kill germs on their surface quickly, and do they have to be like polished to work?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oligodynamic_effect

There's a lot of research on copper, and a lot of research that's pay walled. Judging by the abstracts different metals behave differently even in regards to the type of germ.

His Divine Shadow
Aug 7, 2000

I'm not a fascist. I'm a priest. Fascists dress up in black and tell people what to do.


cakesmith handyman posted:

That's really good looking, how did you hold it to turn the thread? 4-jaw with 1 jaw way out? What order of operations did you use? (I know nothing about machining as you can tell)


Yeah that's what I did, one jaw way out, it was a bit tricky to set up first because I also had to offset it from the face of the chuck to get it far enough out. Fiddly with the spacer wanting to fall out first.

First operation was to cut a smaller block out of a bigger block, which I did with the mill and a slitting saw in the horizontal arbor. And also a bandsaw. Then squaring everything up on the mill before doing the rest on the lathe.

I turned the thread first, then bored the hole, so that I would have the maximum stiffness when threading.

His Divine Shadow
Aug 7, 2000

I'm not a fascist. I'm a priest. Fascists dress up in black and tell people what to do.


I want to make a square collet block, but I wanted something different. I remembered I read about Stefan Gotteswinter making his own and it had some features I liked. Unfortunately his website has updated and his old projects are gone, but I found it using the wayback machine. With pictures even.

https://web.archive.org/web/2018031...lock/index.html

So I made my own except for an ER-32 collet instead of an ER-25. Since I have a full set of those already.







I've forgot to model the hole through the screw with the taper, but yeah there should be a hole there so you can put in stuff of any length. This one is longer than most collet blocks so more clamping area in the vice. Dunno when or if I'll get to making it, ideally it should be hardened and ground but I cannot do that at home. Maybe if I could get my hands on something more durable than mild steel it'd be fine.

updated image:

His Divine Shadow fucked around with this message at 12:56 on Apr 12, 2020

His Divine Shadow
Aug 7, 2000

I'm not a fascist. I'm a priest. Fascists dress up in black and tell people what to do.


Also anyone know anything about swiss surface grinders. One of these for sale in Finland for 868Ä which seems cheap to me for anything swissmade even if it's from the 1970s. I wasn't able to find anyone selling a similar machine with a price, only "request price" kinds of ads. Tripet S.A. based on the images it's an MHPE 500.



Still, don't have the ability to get myself a surface grinder right now and this one might be too large anyway. Still I am curious as to what I am missing out on.

CarForumPoster
Jun 26, 2013


His Divine Shadow posted:

Also anyone know anything about swiss surface grinders. One of these for sale in Finland for 868Ä which seems cheap to me for anything swissmade even if it's from the 1970s. I wasn't able to find anyone selling a similar machine with a price, only "request price" kinds of ads. Tripet S.A. based on the images it's an MHPE 500.



Still, don't have the ability to get myself a surface grinder right now and this one might be too large anyway. Still I am curious as to what I am missing out on.

In the US surface grinders sell for $1K fairly often. That said itís pretty rare that someone really needs a surface grinder.

Yooper
Apr 30, 2012



Grimey Drawer

His Divine Shadow posted:

Also anyone know anything about swiss surface grinders. One of these for sale in Finland for 868Ä which seems cheap to me for anything swissmade even if it's from the 1970s. I wasn't able to find anyone selling a similar machine with a price, only "request price" kinds of ads. Tripet S.A. based on the images it's an MHPE 500.



Still, don't have the ability to get myself a surface grinder right now and this one might be too large anyway. Still I am curious as to what I am missing out on.

http://anglo-swiss-tools.co.uk/trip...nding-machines/ Good article on the Tripets, looks to be a good machine.

I have two surface grinders, small Harig with manual control and a West German (ELB) surface grinder that is full hydraulic except the Z is manual. We got the Harig for tiny jobs but the ELB is just as easy and the hydraulic feed is a huge time saver. Plus you always need a bigger magnet. The price looks cheap, but like CarForumPoster said, you probably don't need one. I've got a full grind shop and we rarely use ours.

His Divine Shadow
Aug 7, 2000

I'm not a fascist. I'm a priest. Fascists dress up in black and tell people what to do.


I don't know, I've been planning on a surface grinder for my shop since 2016. I don't need it any more than I needed the mill and lathe I guess. But it's definitely something I've see a use for with the kinds of stuff I want to tinker with.

Yooper
Apr 30, 2012



Grimey Drawer

His Divine Shadow posted:

I don't know, I've been planning on a surface grinder for my shop since 2016. I don't need it any more than I needed the mill and lathe I guess. But it's definitely something I've see a use for with the kinds of stuff I want to tinker with.

That's all the excuse I'd need. Honestly there's stuff that we mill that is fine but we say, "Oh, why not surface grind it too?". We've never gotten into radius dressing or anything like that, but they can be ridiculously capable machines given the right dressing tooling. The only downside to the ELB is the sheer quantity of mist it generates. Without totally enclosing the machine I'm not sure how you'd get around it either.

His Divine Shadow
Aug 7, 2000

I'm not a fascist. I'm a priest. Fascists dress up in black and tell people what to do.


Seems like a solution for a low pressure but high volume extraction system, like a dust collector for woodworking, but just vents outside.

A Proper Uppercut
Sep 30, 2008



We use our surface grinder a lot. We've got a guy who was a moldmaker for 40-something years because we do a lot of gauges for a major firearms company.

Also with wire edm you end up working with a lot of hardened materials so a grinder is very helpful there too.

CarForumPoster
Jun 26, 2013


I'm not saying they aren't useful, they a ubiquitous machine tool. I've used one when needed myself. If you're a home gamer and you haven't needed one in the 4 years you've been considering one, you prob don't need one. When you get a print that specs a surface finish or GDT callout that screams surface grinder, then give up that shop space to one. Otherwise put $800 into better calipers, gages, 3D printer, tool setting, etc.

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His Divine Shadow
Aug 7, 2000

I'm not a fascist. I'm a priest. Fascists dress up in black and tell people what to do.


Because I've been building a shop for the last 4 years. I do what I can and put the other stuff on hold, I made it this far without a mill and only a lathe too.

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